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See detailA BAYESIAN PROBABILITY CRITERION TO ASSESS ANALYTICAL RESULTS RELIABILITY
Rozet, Eric ULg; Lebrun, Pierre ULg; Boulanger, B et al

Conference (2013, May 21)

In pharmaceutical and biomedical industries, quantitative analytical methods such as HPLC play a key role. Indeed, the analytical results obtained from them are used to make crucial decisions such as the ... [more ▼]

In pharmaceutical and biomedical industries, quantitative analytical methods such as HPLC play a key role. Indeed, the analytical results obtained from them are used to make crucial decisions such as the release of batches of drugs, the evaluation of safety and efficacy of new drug candidates or the monitoring of patients health. Prior to their routine use, analytical methods are submitted to a stringent validation study [1] where they have to demonstrate that they are fit for their final purpose, i.e. providing accurate results: where is the analytical result, is the theoretical unknown true concentration of analyte in the sample analyzed and a regulatory acceptance limit. Typically this demonstration is made by either providing point estimates of systematic error (bias) and random error (variance) or sometimes by providing interval estimates of these statistical parameters at several well defined concentration levels of the target analyte [2]. They are then compared to maximum acceptable levels. More recently, tolerance intervals approaches have been proposed that are evaluated in a similar way at these key concentration levels [3]. However none of these decision approaches allow knowing the probability to obtain accurate results over the whole concentration range of interest: is a vector of parameters and Pmin is a minimum reliability probability. Frequentist approximations have been proposed to estimate this probability but only at the concentration levels experimentally tested [4,5]. In this work, a linear hierarchical Bayesian approach is proposed. It takes into account the potential random characteristic of the slope and intercept observed from one analytical run to the other, but it also integrates the possible covariance between the parameters. Additionally, heteroscedasticity of the residual variance over the concentration range investigated is taken into account. A situation regularly observed in practice. Finally a reliability profile for the whole concentration range studied is obtained using MCMC sampling. This profile provides the probability (Prel) to obtain accurate results over the full concentration range investigated. This profile is then compared to a minimum reliability probability (Pmin) that will define the valid concentration range of the analytical method. The usefulness of this approach is illustrated through the validation of a bioanalytical method and also compared with one concentration level at a time frequentist approaches [4,5]. [1] International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) of Technical Requirements for registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use Topic Q2 (R1): Validation of Analytical Procedures: Text and Methodology, Geneva, 2005. [2] A. Bouabidi and al., J. Chromatogr. A, 1217 (2010) 3180. [3] Ph. Hubert and al., J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal., 36 (2004) 579. [4] W. Dewé and al., Chemometr. Intell. Lab. Syst. 85 (2007) 262. [5] B. Govaerts and al., Qual. Reliab. Engng. Int. 24 (2008) 667. [less ▲]

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See detailMEASURING VARIABILITY SOURCES IN NMR METABOLOMIC STUDIES
Rozet, Eric ULg; De Tullio, Pascal ULg; Hubert, Philippe ULg et al

Conference (2013, May 13)

Due to the huge amount of information available in NMR spectra obtained from the analysis of metabolomic experiments, multivariate analysis such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) are required to ... [more ▼]

Due to the huge amount of information available in NMR spectra obtained from the analysis of metabolomic experiments, multivariate analysis such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) are required to understand the influence of treatments over the metabolites [1]. However, many experiments in metabolomics studies have more complexes variability structures than simply comparing several treatments: they may include time effects, biological effects such as diet or hormonal status, and other blocking factors or variability sources: samples stability, age of the individuals, pH of a buffer, days of acquisition, and so on. Metabolomic data analysis needs to extract from the spectral data matrix the variations linked to a change indicated in the factor of interest. However other sources of variability may impair this objective. This stresses the importance to discover the sources of variability of the spectral metabolomic data using appropriate methodology. Classically, to analyze such data analysis of variance (ANOVA) or multivariate ANOVA (MANOVA) [2] is used. However direct application of these methodologies to NMR spectra obtained from structured metabolomics studies is inappropriate or impossible. More complex data analyses methodologies are required to understand the importance of the various factors implied in the experiments and to provide a measure of their variance components. Three related methodologies have been proposed to achieve this: ASCA [3], ANOVA-PCA [4] and AComDim [5]. The ASCA and ANOVA-PCA methodologies combine first an analysis of variance step (ANOVA) and then a PCA step. The AComDim one adds to the output of the ANOVA-PCA step a multi-block analysis. In this presentation, the usefulness and applicability of these advanced techniques to data analysis of NMR metabolomic spectra are provided to highlight the increase of knowledge gained and the estimation of main sources of variability arising in an experimental setup. Two NMR databases will be used [6]. The first one concerns human serum analyzed by 1H-NMR where three random factors are present: day of measurement (3 days), sample (2 samples per individual) and replication of analyses as well as two fixed controlled factors, time of measurement after thawing (2 times) and two protein suppression methods for the spectral pre-treatment. The second database is about the 1H-NMR analyses of rats’ urine where two different concentrations of citrate and of hippurate were deliberately added and three other sources of variability are present: urine pool diluted or not diluted, repetitions of analyses, days of analyses (three days), as well as two different spectral pre-treatment procedures. [less ▲]

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See detailNON-ANTHOCYANIN POLYPHENOLS QUANTIFICATION IN EUTERPE OLERACEA FRUITS BY A UHPLC−LTQ-ORBITRAP MS METHOD
Dias, Aecio; Rozet, Eric ULg; Chataigné, G et al

Poster (2013, May)

High antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities have been observed from non-anthocyanin polyphenols of E. oleracea fruits [1-2]. The aim of this work was to quantify major non-anthocyanin polyphenols by ... [more ▼]

High antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities have been observed from non-anthocyanin polyphenols of E. oleracea fruits [1-2]. The aim of this work was to quantify major non-anthocyanin polyphenols by an accurate UHPLC−LTQ-Orbitrap MS method. Fruits were harvested in Pará state (Brazil), processed to pulp and lyophilised. 0.5g of dry pulp powder was defatted by sonication with petroleum ether. The residue was then extracted five times with 5mL MeOH each time for 30 min (optimized conditions giving recovery rates > 90%). The extract was evaporated to dryness with a RapidVap® evaporator at 35°C. Solubilization of the dried extract was realised using 40% MeOH. For the UHPLC quantification, a HSS C18 column (1.8µm) was used with a gradient elution of MeOH and H2O both with 0.1% HCOOH and the ionisation source (ESI) was operated in NI mode. 26 compounds were identified, among them 7 identified for the first time in this fruit. Total error and accuracy profiles were used as validation criteria. Calibration in the matrix was found to be more accurate than calibration without matrix. Trueness, repeatability, intermediate precision, selectivity, response function, linearity and LOD/LOQ for 12 non-anthocyanin phenolic compounds were evaluated and the quantification method validated. [1] J. Kang et al., Food Chem. 122 (2010) 610–617. [2] J. Kang et al., Food Chem. 128 (2011) 152–157. [less ▲]

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See detailEnzymatic but not compensated Jaffe methods reach the desirable specifications of NKDEP at normal levels of creatinine. results of the French multicentric evaluation
Boutten, Anne; Bargnoux, Anne-Sophie; Carlier, Marie-Christine et al

in Clinica Chimica Acta (2013), 419

The French Society of Clinical Biochemistry conducted this study to compare the accuracy and performances of the best creatinine enzymatic assays and the compensated Jaffe methods from the same ... [more ▼]

The French Society of Clinical Biochemistry conducted this study to compare the accuracy and performances of the best creatinine enzymatic assays and the compensated Jaffe methods from the same manufacturers. Creatinine was measured in 3 serum pools with creatinine levels of 35.9±0.9 μmol/L, 74.4±1.4 μmol/L, and 97.9±1.7 μmol/L (IDMS determination). The performances of the assays (total error that includes the contribution of bias and imprecision) were evaluated using Monte-Carlo simulations and compared against desirable NKDEP criteria. The enzymatic assays always fell within the desirable total Error of 7.6%. By contrast, this requirement was never obtained for the compensated Jaffe methods at the critical level of 74.4±1.4 μmol/L. Only the compensated Jaffe creatinine on Olympus analyzer reached this specification at 35.9±0.9 and 97.9±1.7 μmol/L levels. This study demonstrates that, despite substantial improvement regarding traceability to the IDMS reference method and precision, compensated Jaffe creatinine methods, by contrast to enzymatic ones, do not reach the desirable specifications of NKDEP at normal levels of creatinine. [less ▲]

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See detailValidation methodologies of near infrared spectroscopy methods in pharmaceutical applications
Chavez, Pierre-François ULg; De Bleye, Charlotte ULg; Sacre, Pierre-Yves ULg et al

in European Pharmaceutical Review (2013), 18(1), 3-6

As any analytical methods, a mandatory step at the end of the development of a near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) method is the validation. This step enables to give enough guarantees that each future ... [more ▼]

As any analytical methods, a mandatory step at the end of the development of a near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) method is the validation. This step enables to give enough guarantees that each future results coming from the application of the method in routine will be closed enough to the true value. However, from the literature, a minority of NIRS methods are thoroughly validated despite of the guidelines published by different group and regulatory authorities to help analyst to adequately decide if his method can be considered as valid. In this context, the aim of this review is to offer a critical overview of the different validation methodologies applied to assess the validity of quantitative methods using near infrared spectroscopy used in the field of pharmacy. [less ▲]

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See detailPAT tools for the control of co-extrusion implants manufacturing process
Krier, Fabrice ULg; Mantanus, Jérome; Sacre, Pierre-Yves ULg et al

in International Journal of Pharmaceutics (2013), 458

Hot melt extrusion is a novel pharmaceutical manufacturing process technique. In this study, we identified four Critical Quality Attributes (CQAs) of the implant manufacturing process by hot melt ... [more ▼]

Hot melt extrusion is a novel pharmaceutical manufacturing process technique. In this study, we identified four Critical Quality Attributes (CQAs) of the implant manufacturing process by hot melt extrusion: the implant diameter, the quantity of the Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API), the homogeneity distribution of API and the thickness of the membrane. We controlled the implant diameter and the quantity of API in-line with a laser measurement, NIR and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. These two different spectroscopic techniques provided comparable results. In fact, the RMSEC and RMSECV were very close in each PAT technique but NIR spectroscopy was easier to use and less sensitive to external changes. For the control of the homogeneity of API distribution and the thickness of the membrane, we used successfully Raman spectroscopy imaging. These PAT tools help reducing analysis time. [less ▲]

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See detailDesign Spaces for Analytical Methods
Rozet, Eric ULg; Lebrun, Pierre ULg; Debrus, Benjamin ULg et al

in Trends in Analytical Chemistry (2013), 42

Since the adoption of the ICH Q8 document concerning the development of pharmaceutical processes following a Quality by Design (QbD) approach, there have been many discussions on the opportunity for ... [more ▼]

Since the adoption of the ICH Q8 document concerning the development of pharmaceutical processes following a Quality by Design (QbD) approach, there have been many discussions on the opportunity for analytical method developments to follow a similar approach. A key component of the QbD paradigm is the definition of the Design Space of analytical methods where assurance of quality is provided. Several Design Spaces for analytical methods have been published, stressing the importance of this concept. This paper aims at explaining what is an analytical method Design Space, why it is useful for the robust development and optimization of analytical methods and how to build such a Design Space. A strong emphasis is made by distinguishing the usual mean response surface approach, overlapping mean response surfaces and the desirability function one to other probabilistic approaches as only these last ones correctly define a Design Space. In addition, recent publications assessing the Design Space of analytical methods are reviewed and discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailBlood lead, urinary lead, urinary δ-aminolevulinic acid and urinary porphyrins levels among people living in kinshasa, D.R. Congo : a pilot biomonitoring study
Mputu Malolo, Corneille-Liévin; Ndelo di Phanzu, Josaphat; Marini Djang'Eing'A, Roland ULg et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (2013), 68(6), 475

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See detailExperimental in situ exposure of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile to 15 trace elements
Richir, Jonathan ULg; Luy, Nicolas; Lepoint, Gilles ULg et al

in Aquatic Toxicology (2013), 140-141

The Mediterranean seagrass Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile has been used for trace element (TE) biomonitoring since decades ago. However, present informations for this bioindicator are limited mainly to ... [more ▼]

The Mediterranean seagrass Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile has been used for trace element (TE) biomonitoring since decades ago. However, present informations for this bioindicator are limited mainly to plant TE levels, while virtually nothing is known about their fluxes through P. oceanica meadows. We therefore contaminated seagrass bed portions in situ at two experimental TE levels with a mix of 15 TEs (Al, V,Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Ag, Cd, Pb and Bi) to study their uptake and loss kinetics in P. oceanica. Shoots immediately accumulated pollutants from the beginning of exposures. Once contaminations ended, TE concentrations came back to their original levels within two weeks, or at least showed a clear decrease. P. oceanica leaves exhibited different uptake kinetics depending on elements and leaf age: the younger growing leaves forming new tissues incorporated TEs more rapidly than the older senescent leaves. Leaf epiphytes also exhibited a net uptake of most TEs, partly similar to that of P. oceanica shoots. The principal route of TE uptake was through the water column, as no contamination of superficial sediments was observed. However, rhizomes indirectly accumulated many TEs during the overall experiments through leaf to rhizome translocation processes. This study thus experimentally confirmed that P.oceanica shoots are undoubtedly an excellent short-term bioindicator and that long-term accumulations could be recorded in P. oceanica rhizomes. [less ▲]

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See detailLaser-induced choroidal neovascularization model to study age-related macular degeneration in mice.
LAMBERT, Vincent ULg; Lecomte, Julie ULg; Hansen, Sylvain ULg et al

in Nature Protocols (2013), 8(11), 2197-2211

The mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) has been used extensively in studies of the exudative form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This experimental in vivo model ... [more ▼]

The mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) has been used extensively in studies of the exudative form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This experimental in vivo model relies on laser injury to perforate Bruch's membrane, resulting in subretinal blood vessel recruitment from the choroid. By recapitulating the main features of the exudative form of human AMD, this assay has served as the backbone for testing antiangiogenic therapies. This standardized protocol can be applied to transgenic mice and can include treatments with drugs, recombinant proteins, antibodies, adenoviruses and pre-microRNAs to aid in the search for new molecular regulators and the identification of novel targets for innovative treatments. This robust assay requires 7-14 d to complete, depending on the treatment applied and whether immunostaining is performed. This protocol includes details of how to induce CNV, including laser induction, lesion excision, processing and different approaches to quantify neoformed vasculature. [less ▲]

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See detailUsefulness of Information Criteria for the Selection of Calibration Curves
Rozet, Eric ULg; Ziemons, Eric ULg; Marini Djang'Eing'A, Roland ULg et al

in Analytical Chemistry (2013), 85

The reliability of analytical results obtained with quantitative analytical methods is highly dependant upon the selection of the adequate model used as calibration curve. To select the adequate response ... [more ▼]

The reliability of analytical results obtained with quantitative analytical methods is highly dependant upon the selection of the adequate model used as calibration curve. To select the adequate response function or model the most used and known parameter is the determination coefficient R². However it is well known that it suffers many inconvenient, such as leading to overfitting the data. A solution proposed is to use the adjusted determination coefficient R²adj that aims at reducing this problem. However there is another family of criteria that exists to allow the selection of an adequate model: the information criteria AIC, AICc and BIC. These criteria have rarely been used in analytical chemistry to select the adequate calibration curve. This works aims at assessing the performance of the statistical information criteria as well as R² and R²adj for the selection of an adequate calibration curve. They are applied to several analytical methods covering liquid chromatographic methods as well as electrophoretic ones involved in the analysis of active substances in biological fluids or aimed at quantifying impurities in drug substances. In addition, Monte-Carlo simulations are performed to assess the efficacy of these statistical criteria to select the adequate calibration curve. [less ▲]

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See detailFast microwave assisted extraction of rotenone for its quantification in seeds of yam bean (Pachyrhizus sp.)
Lautié, E.; Rasse, C.; Rozet, Eric ULg et al

in Journal of Separation Science (2013), 36

The aim of this study was to find if fast microwave assisted extraction could be an alternative to the conventional soxhlet extraction for the quantification of rotenone in yam bean seeds by solid phase ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to find if fast microwave assisted extraction could be an alternative to the conventional soxhlet extraction for the quantification of rotenone in yam bean seeds by solid phase extraction and HPLC-UV. For this purpose, an experimental design was used to determine the optimal conditions of the microwave extraction. Then the values of the quantification on three accessions from two different species of yam bean seeds were compared using the two different kinds of extraction. A microwave extraction of 11 min at 55°C using methanol/dichloromethane (50:50) allowed rotenone extraction either equivalently or more efficiently than the 8h soxhlet extraction method and was less sensitive to moisture content. The selectivity, precision, trueness, accuracy and limit of quantification of themethod with microwave extraction were also demonstrated. [less ▲]

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See detailMethodology for the Validation of Analytical Methods involved in Uniformity of Dosage Units tests
Rozet, Eric ULg; Ziemons, Eric ULg; Marini Djang'Eing'A, Roland ULg et al

in Analytica Chimica Acta (2013), 760

Validation of analytical methods is required prior to their routine use. In addition, the current implementation of the Quality by Design (QbD) framework in the pharmaceutical industries aims at improving ... [more ▼]

Validation of analytical methods is required prior to their routine use. In addition, the current implementation of the Quality by Design (QbD) framework in the pharmaceutical industries aims at improving the quality of the end products starting from its early design stage. However, no regulatory guideline or none of the published methodologies to assess method validation propose decision methodologies that effectively take into account the final purpose of developed analytical methods. In this work a solution is proposed for the specific case of validating analytical methods involved in the assessment of the Content Uniformity or Uniformity of Dosage Units of a batch of pharmaceutical drug products as proposed in the European or US pharmacopoeias. This methodology uses statistical tolerance intervals as decision tools. Moreover it adequately defines the Analytical Target Profile of analytical methods in order to obtain analytical methods that allow to make correct decisions about Content Uniformity or Uniformity of Dosage Units with high probability. The applicability of the proposed methodology is further illustrated using an HPLC-UV assay as well as a Near Infra-Red Spectrophotometric method. [less ▲]

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See detailImplementation of a Design Space Approach for Enantiomeric Separations in Polar Organic Solvent Chromatography
Nistor, Iolanda; Lebrun, Pierre ULg; Ceccato, Attilio ULg et al

in Journal of Pharmaceutical & Biomedical Analysis (2013), 74

This paper focuses on implementing a Design Space approach and on the critical process parameters (CPPs) to consider when applying the Quality by Design (QbD) concepts outlined in ICH Q8(R2), Q9 and Q10 ... [more ▼]

This paper focuses on implementing a Design Space approach and on the critical process parameters (CPPs) to consider when applying the Quality by Design (QbD) concepts outlined in ICH Q8(R2), Q9 and Q10 to analytical method development and optimization for three chiral compounds developed as modulators of small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels. In this sense, an HPLC method using a polysaccharide-based stationary phase containing a cellulose tris (4-chloro-3-methylphenylcarbamate) chiral selector in polar organic solvent chromatography mode was considered. The effects of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and n-hexane concentration in an acetonitrile (MeCN) mobile phase were investigated under a wide range of column temperatures. Good correlations were found between the observed data obtained after using a central composite design and the expected chromatographic behaviours predicted by applying the design of experiments-design space (DoE-DS) methodology. The critical quality attribute represented here by the separation criterion (Scrit) allowed assessing the quality of the enantioseparation. Baseline separation for the compounds of interest in an analysis time of less than 20 minutes was possible due to the original and powerful tools applied which facilitated an enhanced method comprehension. Finally, the advantage of the DoE-DS approach resides in granting the possibility to concurrently assess robustness and identify the optimal conditions which are compound dependent. [less ▲]

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See detailAPPLICATION OF AN INNOVATIVE DESIGN SPACE OPTIMIZATION STRATEGY TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF LC METHODS TO COMBAT POTENTIALLY COUNTERFEIT NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS
Mbinze Kindenge, Jérémie ULg; Lebrun, Pierre ULg; Debrus, Benjamin ULg et al

in Journal of Chromatography. A (2012), 1263

In the context of the battle against counterfeit medicines, an innovative methodology has been used to develop rapid and specific high performance liquid chromatographic methods to detect and determine 18 ... [more ▼]

In the context of the battle against counterfeit medicines, an innovative methodology has been used to develop rapid and specific high performance liquid chromatographic methods to detect and determine 18 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, 5 pharmaceutical conservatives, paracetamol, chlorzoxazone, caffeine and salicylic acid. These molecules are commonly encountered alone or in combination on the market. Regrettably, a significant proportion of these consumed medicines are counterfeit or substandard, with a strong negative impact in countries of Central Africa. In this context, an innovative design space optimization strategy was successfully applied to the development of LC screening methods allowing the detection of substandard or counterfeit medicines. Using the results of a unique experimental design, the design spaces of 5 potentially relevant HPLC methods have been developed, and transferred to an ultra high performance liquid chromatographic system to evaluate the robustness of the predicted DS while providing rapid methods of analysis. Moreover, one of the methods has been fully validated using the accuracy profile as decision tool, and was then used for the quantitative determination of three active ingredients and one impurity in a common and widely used pharmaceutical formulation. The method was applied to 5 pharmaceuticals sold in the Democratic Republic of Congo. None of these pharmaceuticals was found compliant to the European Medicines Agency specifications [less ▲]

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See detailDEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A LC-UV METHOD FOR THE DOSAGE OF A TRACER IN AN IMPROVED TRADITIONAL MEDICINE
Tshisekedi Tshibangu, Pascal; Kalenda Dibungi T., Pascal; Wauters, Jean-Noël ULg et al

Conference (2012, July)

According to World Health Organisation, 80% of the African populations use Improved Traditional Medicines (ITM) to threat several diseases. Even if some of these ITM are nowadays registered with local ... [more ▼]

According to World Health Organisation, 80% of the African populations use Improved Traditional Medicines (ITM) to threat several diseases. Even if some of these ITM are nowadays registered with local health authorities, the knowledge of their qualitative and quantitative composition still remains a challenge for ensuring health security of populations. In this context, an analytical method using liquid chromatography technique with UV detection was developed to allow the dosage of a tracer (major compound) in an ITM (syrup containing extract plants) registered in D.R. Congo by the “Centre de Recherche en Médecine Traditionnelle Améliorée” and marketed for use against malaria. For that purpose, a simple and rapid experimental plan considering a Plackett-Burman design was applied by testing simultaneously two significant factors, temperature of analytical column (T°) and gradient time (TG) for eluting acetonitrile (ACN) from 5% to 95%, while focusing on the separation of the tracer and an adjacent unknown compound (critical peak pairs). Suitable separation (resolution of 1.5) was obtained between these latter with T° of 15°C and TG of 60 min (20% to 65% of ACN). Prior to routine use, the analytical method was validated following the total error strategy described by the SFSTP guidelines and according to the ISO norm 17025:2005. Specificity/selectivity of the method was demonstrated by the absence of interference at the retention time of the major compound comparing to the syrup matrix. Very interesting results were observed for trueness (relative biases below 0.9%), for precision (RSD mostly below 2.2% for repeatability and time-different intermediate precision), for accuracy (beta tolerance intervals below 10% of the acceptance limits) and linearity. Finally, the method was applied to quantify the major compound in several batches of syrups ITM as well as for stability studies. [less ▲]

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