References of "Rots, Veerle"
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See detailResidue and microwear analyses of the stone tools from Schöningen
Rots, Veerle ULg; Hardy, Bruce; Serangeli, Jordi et al

in Journal of Human Evolution (in press)

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See detailProjectiles and hafting technology
Rots, Veerle ULg

in Iovita, Radu; Sano, Katsuhiro (Eds.) Multidisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Stone Age Weaponry (in press)

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See detailUse-wear and Hafting Traces in Perspective: the Contribution of Ethnographic Evidence
Rots, Veerle ULg

in Weedman, Kathryn; Brandt, Steven (Eds.) The Konso of Southern Ethiopia (in press)

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See detailBifacial serrated technology in the southern African Still Bay: new data from Sibudu Cave, Kwazulu-Natal
Schmid, Viola; Porraz, Guillaume; Rots, Veerle ULg et al

Conference (2015, September)

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See detailIntroduction: Palaeolithic stone tool hafting
Rots, Veerle ULg

Scientific conference (2015, June)

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See detailIntroduction: vegetal, animal and mineral residues
Rots, Veerle ULg

Scientific conference (2015, June)

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See detailTowards an experiment based protocol for extracting and identifying residues
Cnuts, Dries ULg; Rots, Veerle ULg

Conference (2015, May 29)

Residue analysis has recently become a widely applied method in reconstructing the lifecycle of prehistoric stone tools. The identification of residues is traditionally based on the distinctive ... [more ▼]

Residue analysis has recently become a widely applied method in reconstructing the lifecycle of prehistoric stone tools. The identification of residues is traditionally based on the distinctive morphologies of the residue fragments by means of light microscopy. The majority of residue fragments, however, tend to have an amorphous structure and are therefore not easy to identify. In addition, some residue categories can only be detected by using transmitted light microscopy, which requires the extraction of residues from the tool’s surface. Yet another challenge is to determine whether the residues were deposited on the tool’s surface as a result of use or due to other processes. Here we present the results of an experimental study that addresses these methodological issues. Stone tools from a new experimental reference collection were used to test 6 different analytical methods: the observation of residues on stone tools with incident light microscopy, dry sampling using tweezers and brushes, wet sampling with micropipettes using distilled water and a tri-mixture of acetonitrile, ethanol and water, and extraction with an ultrasonic scaler or bath. The experiments demonstrate that the choice of a particular extraction procedure may influence the amount and types of residues that are extracted. This implies that the analytical method has an impact on the results of a residue analysis. Building on these data, we designed a new protocol, which was subsequently submitted to blind testing in order to test its accuracy and precision. Certain key attributes were also identified that may prove useful in distinguishing between use-related and natural residues. We discuss the importance of adapting analytical protocols to the research question of the study. [less ▲]

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See detailToward a more precise terminology for impact damage and an improved understanding of hunting weapons: First results from a large scale systematic experiment
Coppe, Justin ULg; Rots, Veerle ULg

Conference (2015, May 29)

Projectile points have recently taken an important place in debates on the complexity of Palaeolithic human behaviour. While the appearance of hunting weapons in the archaeological record was an important ... [more ▼]

Projectile points have recently taken an important place in debates on the complexity of Palaeolithic human behaviour. While the appearance of hunting weapons in the archaeological record was an important element in the past, current discussions focus a lot on the appearance of particular hunting methods. Distinctions are made between simple and complex weaponry, the latter assumed to be linked with modern humans only. While most of the identifications of hunting weapons in the archaeological record rely on the examination of so-called diagnostic impact damage, no reliable reference yet exist for distinguishing between hunting methods. We present the first results of a large-scale and systematic experiment that intends to address hunting weapons in a systematic way. A thorough survey of the literature has highlighted some existing ambiguity in current terminological frameworks for describing impact fractures. Based on our experiments, we propose some attributes that may be relevant for improving these terminologies. Attention will also be devoted to the design and conceptual framework of our experimental program and to some first results concerning the essential variables influencing damage formation. The overall goal is to improve our understanding of the different fracture phenomena and their variability in order to enhance the reliability of the identification of hunting weapons and perhaps of their projecting mode. [less ▲]

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See detailThe more you know...........various approaches in the analysis of tools from Liang Bua, Flores Indonesia
Lentfer, Carol ULg; Stephenson, Birgitta; Cnuts, Dries ULg et al

Conference (2015, May 28)

Chipped stone flakes from sedimentary deposits from the Liang Bua site, Flores, Indonesia have been found in association with faunal remains and skeletal remains identified as Homo floresiensis. Use-wear ... [more ▼]

Chipped stone flakes from sedimentary deposits from the Liang Bua site, Flores, Indonesia have been found in association with faunal remains and skeletal remains identified as Homo floresiensis. Use-wear and well-preserved organic residues on these flakes provide an opportunity to understand subsistence and behaviour of Homo floresiensis by determining how they were manipulated and what they were used for. This paper describes the analytical techniques including various microscope and staining methodologies used in residue analyses. It compares the efficacy and describes the outcome of these techniques in relation to the functional analysis of the Liang Bua lithic assemblage. [less ▲]

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See detailTool use and hafting in the Middle Palaeolithic of Northern Africa An on-going use-wear analysis on the Mousterian/Aterian assemblages of Ifri n’Ammar (Morocco)
Tomasso, Sonja ULg; Rots, Veerle ULg

Conference (2015, May 28)

The so-called “Aterian Culture” has received attention since the early days of prehistoric archaeology in Northern Africa. Several definitions were proposed, which triggered a debate around this cultural ... [more ▼]

The so-called “Aterian Culture” has received attention since the early days of prehistoric archaeology in Northern Africa. Several definitions were proposed, which triggered a debate around this cultural concept. In particular the presence of the tanged tools was a crucial element in these debates and the tangs were considered to potentially represent the earliest indications of hafting, or at least of intentional morphological adaptations in view of hafting. In contrast to numerous typological and technological studies of Aterian and Mousterian assemblages, use-wear analyses have been scarce up until today. However, for a better understanding of several aspects of these Middle Palaeolithic “cultures”, functional data needs to be taken into consideration. Given the issue of tanged pieces, the potential of such detailed studies on production, hafting and use is high. In this paper, the first results will be presented of an on-going use-wear analysis on tools from the Aterian/Mousterian assemblages of Ifri n’Ammar. This rock shelter presents an ideal case thanks to its particularly rich and well preserved stratigraphy. Around 200 artefacts have been selected up to now, based on their degree of preservation and without restrictions on the level of the tool types. Artefacts were examined macroscopically and microscopically in a search for evidence of their production, hafting and use and an experimental program was set up. Archaeological interpretations are based on new experiments, as well as on the existing large experimental reference collection available at TraceoLab at the University of Liège. The long-term goal of the study is to use a functional approach to answer questions related to lithic assemblage variability. At Ifri n’Ammar, it is clear that the tangs occur on a variety of tools. Due to the presence of tangs in the Aterian and their absence in the Mousterian, it can be hypothesized that there was a shift in hafting techniques between the two cultures/periods. In order to understand whether this change was triggered by functional, cultural, or environmental factors, more functional data is clearly needed. [less ▲]

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See detailStone tool hafting and use in the European Upper Palaeolithic: the first results of the analysis of Gravettian tools from Hohle Fels
Taipale, Noora ULg; Rots, Veerle ULg

Conference (2015, May 28)

European Upper Palaeolithic lithic assemblages have been so far defined largely on a typological or technological basis, while extensive studies that would utilise the full potential of microwear analysis ... [more ▼]

European Upper Palaeolithic lithic assemblages have been so far defined largely on a typological or technological basis, while extensive studies that would utilise the full potential of microwear analysis have been few. This contribution presents the first results of an ongoing PhD project dedicated to the variability in stone tool use and hafting in the Upper Palaeolithic of Central and Western Europe. The aim of the project is to understand the development as well as regional patterns in tool hafting and use in the Gravettian and Magdalenian, and thus better explain the observed morphological and technological shifts. For this purpose, samples of tools from five European key sites with well-dated sequences (Hohle Fels, Geißenklösterle, Vogelherd, Maisières-Canal, and Abri Pataud) will be analysed giving a special emphasis on hafting traces. The study wishes to promote functional analysis as an integral part of technological studies, not as a mere side note. The German cave site Hohle Fels is used here as a case study to illustrate the potential of this kind of approach. The first results of the analysis of the site’s Gravettian material will be put into a wider context of earlier published results as well as preliminary observations made on the other assemblages included in the present study. Building on these results, the impact of tool hafting and use on the morphology of Gravettian lithic implements will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailSearching for early traces of fire production on flint tools
Sorensen, Andrew; Rots, Veerle ULg

Conference (2015, May)

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See detailStone tool use and hominin evolution
Fullagar, Richard; Rots, Veerle ULg

Conference (2015, May)

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See detailLearning from blind tests: residues on grinding stones and flaked stone tools
Rots, Veerle ULg; Hayes, Elspeth; Cnuts, Dries ULg et al

Conference (2015, May)

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See detailStone tool hafting and use in the European Upper Palaeolithic: first results from Hohle Fels
Taipale, Noora ULg; Rots, Veerle ULg

Poster (2015, April 07)

European Upper Palaeolithic lithic assemblages have been so far defined largely on a typological or technological basis, whereas extensive studies that would utilise the full potential of functional ... [more ▼]

European Upper Palaeolithic lithic assemblages have been so far defined largely on a typological or technological basis, whereas extensive studies that would utilise the full potential of functional analysis have been few. In this poster, I will present the outline and first results of an ongoing PhD project dedicated to the variability in stone tool use and hafting in the Upper Palaeolithic of Central and Western Europe. Recent methodological developments have made possible the distinction between hafted and hand-held tools and the identification of different hafting modes in archaeological assemblages. The aim of my research is to understand the main developments and regional patterns in tool hafting and use in the Gravettian and Magdalenian, and evaluate their impact on lithic assemblage variability. The cave site Hohle Fels serves here as a case study, and the first results of the analysis of the site’s Gravettian material will be used to illustrate the potential of this kind of approach in the study of past human behaviour, cognition and culture. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards a more behavioral approach: the contribution of wear studies
Rots, Veerle ULg

in Shott, Michael J. (Ed.) Works in Stone (2015)

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See detailKeys to the identification of prehension and hafting traces
Rots, Veerle ULg

in Marreiros, Juan; Gibaja, Juan; Bicho, Nuno (Eds.) Use-Wear and Residue Analysis in Archaeology (2015)

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See detailHafting and the interpretation of site function in the European Middle Palaeolithic
Rots, Veerle ULg

in Conard, Nicholas; Delagnes, Anne (Eds.) Settlement Dynamics of the Middle Paleolithic and Middle Stone Age (2015)

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See detailTool use and hafting in the Middle Palaeolithic of North Africa: preliminary results of an on-going use-wear analysis on the Mousterian/Aterian assemblages of Ifri n’Ammar (Morocco)
Tomasso, Sonja ULg; Rots, Veerle ULg; Eiwanger, Josef

Conference (2014, September 02)

The rock shelter of Ifri n’Ammar has a remarkable stratigraphy with alternating Mousterian and Aterian occupations within more than 6 meters of sediments dated from MIS 6 to 5a. The stratigraphy ... [more ▼]

The rock shelter of Ifri n’Ammar has a remarkable stratigraphy with alternating Mousterian and Aterian occupations within more than 6 meters of sediments dated from MIS 6 to 5a. The stratigraphy attributed to the Middle-Palaeolithic is divided in two units, separated by a calcareous crust, where upper and lower Aterian occupations can be identified. Previous studies have characterised Aterian and Mousterian cultures on a typological and technological basis. Functional data on lithic industries from the Middle Palaeolithic in northern Africa is at present very scarce and detailed studies of the production, hafting and use of tools, particularly tanged pieces, have not yet been conducted. Preliminary results of an on-going use-wear analysis of Middle Palaeolithic stone tools from the site of Ifri n’Ammar will be presented. Both low and high magnifications are combined for examining the macro- and microscopic wear traces on the stone tools. The interpretation of the archaeological material is based on comparisons with an experimental reference collection. The long-term goal of the study is to understand how stone tools were used, whether hafted stone tools existed at the site and how these functional parameters compare to the typo-technological characteristics of the different assemblages and how they may have influenced assemblage variability. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (2 ULg)