References of "Robe, Pierre"
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See detailSurvivin enhances radiation resistance in primary human glioblastoma cells via caspase-independent mechanisms.
Chakravarti, Arnab; Zhai, Gary G; Zhang, Min et al

in Oncogene (2004), 23(45), 7494-506

The observed radioresistance of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) poses a major challenge, which, if overcome, may lead to significant advances in the management of this patient population. There is ... [more ▼]

The observed radioresistance of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) poses a major challenge, which, if overcome, may lead to significant advances in the management of this patient population. There is accumulating evidence from correlative studies that Survivin expression is associated with increased malignant potential of human gliomas. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether Survivin plays a direct role in mediating radiation resistance in primary human glioma cell lines, and, if so, investigating the underlying mechanisms. Our panel of GBM cell lines included two that were relatively radiation resistant (GM20 and GM21) and two that were more radiation sensitive (GM22 and GM23), which demonstrated differential levels of Survivin expression between the two groups. Through the use of adenoviral vectors containing either dominant-negative (pAd-S(T34A)) or wild-type Suvrivin (pAd-S(WT)), we were able to inactivate or overexpress Survivin, respectively. Our findings suggest that Survivin plays a critical role in mediating radiation resistance in primary GBM cells, in part through suppression of apoptotic cell death via a caspase-independent manner. We have identified novel mechanisms by which Survivin may enhance tumor cell survival upon radiation exposure such as regulation of double-strand DNA break repair and tumor cell metabolism, which were most evident in the radiation-resistant cell lines. These differences in Survivin function both in radiation-resistant vs radiation-sensitive cell lines and in the presence vs absence of radiation exposure warrant further investigation and highlight potentially important mechanisms of radiation resistance in these tumors. [less ▲]

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See detailSodium bromide encephalopathy with decreased serum Cl- level and increased anion gap: report of one case.
Robe, Pierre ULg; Sadzot, Bernard ULg; Frank, Georges

in European Neurology (2004), 51(4), 246-7

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See detailPrimary central nervous system lymphoma - Report of 32 cases and review of the literature
Dubuisson, Annie ULg; Kaschten, Bruno ULg; Lenelle, Jacques ULg et al

in Clinical Neurology & Neurosurgery (2004), 107(1), 55-63

We retrospectively analyzed 32 cases of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Five cases were diagnosed in the period 1987-1994, for 27 cases in the period 1995-2002. There were 17 men and 15 ... [more ▼]

We retrospectively analyzed 32 cases of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Five cases were diagnosed in the period 1987-1994, for 27 cases in the period 1995-2002. There were 17 men and 15 women whose median age was 69 years. Three patients were immunodeficient. The commonest symptoms were focal deficit (16 patients) and cognitive/behaviour disturbances (14 patients). Radiologically, a total of 47 contrast-enhancing lesions were observed in 32 patients; 18 patients had deep-seated lesions. All but two patients underwent histological diagnosis following craniotomy (11 patients) and/or stereotaxic biopsy (22 patients); diagnosis was obtained on CSF cytology in one patient with a third ventricle tumour. In the last patient, the diagnosis was based on the finding of marked tumour shrinkage under corticotherapy, despite two negative histological examinations. Treatment included surgical resection (10 patients), chemotherapy (25 patients) and/or radiotherapy (12 patients). According to the therapeutic recommendations of the GELA (Groupe d'Etude des Lymphomes de l'Adulte), 19 patients received at least two courses of high-dose methotrexate; intrathecal chemotherapy was used in 20 patients with methotrexate and/or cytosine arabinoside. Radiation therapy consisted of whole brain irradiation followed by a boost on tumour site. Nine patients received a combined treatment of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Twelve patients showed rapid progression to death. At the time of last contact, 28/32 patients (88%) had died, all from PCNSL disease or from complications due to its treatment. The median Survival time was 13.9 months. We conclude that PCNSL is an increasingly frequent tumour. The diagnosis is obtained by stereotactic biopsy in the majority of cases. The prognosis appears dismal despite an intensive multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailModulation of the HSV-TK/ganciclovir bystander effect by n-butyrate in glioblastoma: correlation with gap-junction intercellular communication.
Robe, Pierre ULg; Jolois, Olivier ULg; Nguyen Khac, Minh-Tuan ULg et al

in International Journal of Oncology (2004), 25(1), 187-92

The efficacy of HSV-TK/ganciclovir gene therapy largely relies on the bystander effect, i.e. the ability of transfected cells to kill the adjacent, untrasfected cells. This mechanism itself depends ... [more ▼]

The efficacy of HSV-TK/ganciclovir gene therapy largely relies on the bystander effect, i.e. the ability of transfected cells to kill the adjacent, untrasfected cells. This mechanism itself depends chiefly on the transfer via gap junctions of phosphorylated ganciclovir between cells, and is often deficient in glioblastomas. In this report, we demonstrate that n-butyrate markedly enhances the gap junction intercellular communication of GJIC-deficient glioma cells, and significantly increases the bystander effect in such cells. This effect of n-butyrate appears to be independent from its HDAC inhibitory effect, since trichostatin A does not reproduce it. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro and in vivo activity of the nuclear factor-kappa B inhibitor sulfasalazine in human glioblastomas.
Robe, Pierre ULg; Bentires-Alj, Mohamed; Bonif, Marianne et al

in Clinical Cancer Research : An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (2004), 10(16), 5595-603

Glioblastomas, the most common primary brain cancers, respond poorly to current treatment modalities and carry a dismal prognosis. In this study, we demonstrated that the transcription factor nuclear ... [more ▼]

Glioblastomas, the most common primary brain cancers, respond poorly to current treatment modalities and carry a dismal prognosis. In this study, we demonstrated that the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB is constitutively activated in glioblastoma surgical samples, primary cultures, and cell lines and promotes their growth and survival. Sulfasalazine, an anti-inflammatory drug that specifically inhibits the activation of NF-kappaB, blocked the cell cycle and induced apoptosis in several glioblastoma cell lines and primary cultures, as did gene therapy with a vector encoding a super-repressor of NF-kappaB. In vivo, sulfasalazine also significantly inhibited the growth of experimental human glioblastomas in nude mice brains. Given the documented safety of sulfasalazine in humans, these results may lead the way to a new class of glioma treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailPrimary cerebral lymphoma. A retrospective study of 32 patients
Dubuisson, Annie ULg; Kaschten, Bruno ULg; Lenelle, Jacques ULg et al

Conference (2002, April 25)

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See detailRat Gap Junction Connexin-30 Inhibits Proliferation of Glioma Cell Lines
Princen, Frederic; Robe, Pierre ULg; Gros, D. et al

in Carcinogenesis (2001), 22(3), 507-13

Connexins, the structural components of gap junctions, control cell growth and differentiation and are believed to belong to a family of tumour suppressor genes. Studies on connexin localization in brain ... [more ▼]

Connexins, the structural components of gap junctions, control cell growth and differentiation and are believed to belong to a family of tumour suppressor genes. Studies on connexin localization in brain showed that several of these proteins were expressed in distinct compartments of the brain in a cell-type specific manner, indicating that different gap junctions play specific roles in the physiology of the mammalian brain. In this report, we first cloned rat connexin-30 cDNA from brain and showed that it was expressed in long-term primary culture of rat astrocytes. In order to examine the potential role of connexin-30 in tumour cell proliferation, we transfected the connexin-30 cDNA into two rat glioma cell lines (9L and C6) which have lost its expression. Transfected clones adequately expressed membrane-bound connexin-30 protein. Connexin-30-expressing clones showed slower growth, lower DNA synthesis and reduced proliferation in soft agar as compared with the parental and control cells. We concluded that connexin-30 may also probably be considered as a tumour suppressor in rat gliomas. [less ▲]

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See detailNuclear Factor-Kappa B, Cancer, and Apoptosis
Bours, Vincent ULg; Bentires-Alj, M.; Hellin, A. C. et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2000), 60(8), 1085-9

The role of nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B in the regulation of apoptosis in normal and cancer cells has been extensively studied in recent years. Constitutive NF-kappa B activity in B lymphocytes as well as ... [more ▼]

The role of nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B in the regulation of apoptosis in normal and cancer cells has been extensively studied in recent years. Constitutive NF-kappa B activity in B lymphocytes as well as in Hodgkin's disease and breast cancer cells protects these cells against apoptosis. It has also been reported that NF-kappa B activation by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, chemotherapeutic drugs, or ionizing radiations can protect several cell types against apoptosis, suggesting that NF-kappa B could participate in resistance to cancer treatment. These observations were explained by the regulation of antiapoptotic gene expression by NF-kappa B. However, in our experience, inhibition of NF-kappa B activity in several cancer cell lines has a very variable effect on cell mortality, depending on the cell type, the stimulus, and the level of NF-kappa B inhibition. Moreover, in some experimental systems, NF-kappa B activation is required for the onset of apoptosis. Therefore, it is likely that the NF-kappa B antiapoptotic role in response to chemotherapy is cell type- and signal-dependent and that the level of NF-kappa B inhibition is important. These issues will have to be carefully investigated before considering NF-kappa B as a target for genetic or pharmacological anticancer therapies. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowth Regulation of Astrocytes and C6 Cells by Tgfbeta1: Correlation with Gap Junctions
Robe, Pierre ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Merville, Marie-Paule ULg et al

in Neuroreport (2000), 11(13), 2837-41

Transforming growth factor (TGF) beta1 enhanced in vitro [3H]thymidine incorporation into C6 cells and reduced that of astrocytes in the presence of a high serum concentration. It concomitantly raised the ... [more ▼]

Transforming growth factor (TGF) beta1 enhanced in vitro [3H]thymidine incorporation into C6 cells and reduced that of astrocytes in the presence of a high serum concentration. It concomitantly raised the gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in normal astrocytes but reduced the coupling of C6 cells, and respectively increased or decreased the proportion of P2-phosphorylated connexin (Cx) 43 isoform in these cells. Finally, octanol, which inhibited GJIC in both cell types, increased the thymidine incorporation in C6 cells, but neither altered the proliferation of astrocytes nor their response to TGFbeta1. These data indicate that an inhibition of gap junction intercellular communication, due to an altered phosphorylation of connexin 43, may contribute to the proliferative response of C6 glioblastoma cells to TGFbeta1. [less ▲]

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See detailPharmacological Modulation of the Bystander Effect in the Herpes Simplex Virus Thymidine Kinase/Ganciclovir Gene Therapy System: Effects of Dibutyryl Adenosine 3',5'-Cyclic Monophosphate, Alpha-Glycyrrhetinic Acid, and Cytosine Arabinoside
Robe, Pierre ULg; Princen, Frédéric; Martin, Didier ULg et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2000), 60(2), 241-9

The herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) suicide gene/ganciclovir system was first applied to the treatment of glioblastoma tumors, but was hampered by the low gene transfection yield ... [more ▼]

The herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) suicide gene/ganciclovir system was first applied to the treatment of glioblastoma tumors, but was hampered by the low gene transfection yield. Fortunately, the gap junction-dependent diffusion of phosphorylated ganciclovir metabolites from transfected cells to their neighbors proved to enhance the overall benefit of this strategy. However, as tumor cells are often gap junction-deficient, we sought to restore this property pharmacologically and hence to improve the efficacy of the treatment. We demonstrated that this approach was feasible in glioblastoma cells using dibutyryl adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) (100 microM) as a pharmacological inducer of gap junctions. alpha-Glycyrrhetinic acid (25 microM), on the other hand, strongly inhibited both gap junction-mediated intercellular communication and the bystander effect, thus confirming the role of gap junctions in HSV-tk-mediated bystander killing. Using cytosine arabinoside as a growth inhibitor, we underlined the role of tumor cell proliferation in the sensitivity of HSV-tk-transfected cells to ganciclovir and demonstrated its correlation with the importance of the bystander effect. [less ▲]

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See detailA Cell Type-Specific and Gap Junction-Independent Mechanism for the Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Thymidine Kinase Gene/Ganciclovir-Mediated Bystander Effect
Princen, Frederic; Robe, Pierre ULg; Lechanteur, Chantal ULg et al

in Clinical Cancer Research : An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (1999), 5(11), 3639-44

Tumor cells expressing the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene are killed by nucleoside analogues such as ganciclovir (GCV). GCV affects not only the cells expressing HSV-tk but ... [more ▼]

Tumor cells expressing the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene are killed by nucleoside analogues such as ganciclovir (GCV). GCV affects not only the cells expressing HSV-tk but also neighboring cells that do not express the gene; this phenomenon commonly is called "bystander effect." GCV metabolites transfer via gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) accounts for the bystander effect in different cell lines, but other mechanisms have also been described. In this study, we analyzed the mechanisms of the bystander effect in two cell lines exhibiting different capacities of communication (DHD/K12 and 9L). The 9L cells exhibited a very good bystander effect, which was completely blocked by a long-term inhibitor of GJIC, 18 alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid. DHD/K12 cells exhibited a moderate bystander effect that was not abolished by 18 alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid or 1-octanol, another strong inhibitor of GJIC. Interestingly, we also observed a bystander effect in cultures where HSV-tk-expressing DHD/K12 cells were physically separated from their untransfected counterparts but grown in the same medium. Moreover, the transfer of filtered conditioned medium from GCV-treated HSV-tk-expressing DHD/K12 cells to DHD/K12 parental cells induced a decrease of survival in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that the bystander effect in this cell line was mediated by a soluble factor. [less ▲]

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See detailPosterior epidural migration of sequestered lumbar disc fragments. Report of two cases.
Robe, Pierre ULg; Martin, Didier ULg; Lenelle, Jacques ULg et al

in Journal of Neurosurgery (1999), 90(2 Suppl), 264-6

The posterior epidural migration of sequestered lumbar disc fragments is an uncommon event. The authors report two such cases in which patients presented with either intense radicular pain or cauda equina ... [more ▼]

The posterior epidural migration of sequestered lumbar disc fragments is an uncommon event. The authors report two such cases in which patients presented with either intense radicular pain or cauda equina syndrome. The radiological characteristics were the posterior epidural location and the ring enhancement of the mass after injection of contrast material. The major diagnostic pitfalls are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Schwann Cell Transplantation in a Contusion Model of Rat Spinal Cord Injury
Martin, Didier ULg; Robe, Pierre ULg; Franzen, Rachelle ULg et al

in Journal of Neuroscience Research (1996), 45(5), 588-597

Cultured Schwann cells were transplanted at various delays into a spinal cord contusion injury performed at low thoracic level in adult female rats. The Schwann cells were purified from the dorsal root ... [more ▼]

Cultured Schwann cells were transplanted at various delays into a spinal cord contusion injury performed at low thoracic level in adult female rats. The Schwann cells were purified from the dorsal root ganglia of adult syngeneic animals. the transplants were well tolerated, and the transplanted Schwann cells invaded the injured spinal cord. As quantified using video image analysis, the survival and growth of the transplanted cells were poor when the grafting procedure was performed 3-4 days after injury and very good when performed immediately or 10 days after injury, in which cases post-traumatic micro- and macrocavitation were strongly reduced. In animals grafted immediately after injury but not in animals grafted after 10 days, post-traumatic astrogliosis was much reduced. The Schwann cells transplanted area was invaded by numerous regenerating axons, the vast majority of which were, based on the neurotransmitter (CGRP and SP) profile, originating from dorsal root ganglion. No regeneration of the corticospinal tract as assessed after anterograde tracing or of descending aminergic fibers could be demonstrated. [less ▲]

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See detailAlpha-MSH stimulates neurite outgrowth of neonatal rat corticospinal neurons in vitro.
Joosten, E. A.; Verhaagh, S.; Martin, Didier ULg et al

in Brain Research (1996), 736(1-2), 91-8

Peptides related to melanocortin (alpha MSH) and corticotropin (ACTH), collectively termed melanocortins, exert trophic effects on the outgrowth of neurites from peripheral and central nervous system in ... [more ▼]

Peptides related to melanocortin (alpha MSH) and corticotropin (ACTH), collectively termed melanocortins, exert trophic effects on the outgrowth of neurites from peripheral and central nervous system in vitro. Here we study the neurite outgrowth promoting effect of alpha-MSH on corticospinal (CS) neurons in vitro. Corticospinal neurons were identified in cell culture of neonatal rat cortex by immunostaining of cholera toxin subunit B (CTB), retrogradely transported from the cervical parts of the spinal cord. The CTB-immunoreactive neurons represent a small percentage (3-5%) of the total cell population after 72 h in vitro. The axons or dendrites of cortical and CTB-labelled layer V neurons were visualized using antibodies against axon- or dendrite-specific markers and measured using a semi-automatic quantification device. Here we report that alpha-MSH stimulates axonal as well as dendrite outgrowth from both total and CTB-labelled neurons with a bell-shape response curve. Axonal outgrowth of CTB-labelled neurons was dose-dependently stimulated with a maximal effect of 50% at 10(-10) M alpha-MSH. The maximal effect for stimulation of axon outgrowth for the total cortex population was observed at 10(-8) M alpha-MSH. In addition dendrite outgrowth of both total and CTB-labelled neurons is stimulated in a dose-dependent manner with maximal effects (varying between 46 and 48%) at 10(-8) M alpha-MSH. Explanations in the shift for the optimal alpha-MSH concentration for stimulation of axonal outgrowth of CTB-labelled layer V neurons as compared to total cortex neurons are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailA model of spinal cord injury: the balloon-compressive model
Martin, Didier ULg; Franzen, R.; Robe, Pierre ULg et al

Conference (1995, September 03)

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