References of "Richel, Aurore"
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See detailOptimization of a formic/acetic acid delignification treatment on beech wood and its influence on the structural characteristics of the extracted lignins
Simon, Mathilde; Brostaux, Yves ULg; Vanderghem, Caroline ULg et al

in Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology (2014), 89(1), 128-136

Background In order to replace petrochemicals by bio-based lignin products in a lot of high value-added applications, a formic/acetic acid treatment was adapted to beech wood (Fagus sylvatica L.) for ... [more ▼]

Background In order to replace petrochemicals by bio-based lignin products in a lot of high value-added applications, a formic/acetic acid treatment was adapted to beech wood (Fagus sylvatica L.) for lignin extraction. Results Beech wood particles were delignified at atmospheric pressure by a formic acid/acetic acid/water mixture. Cooking time and temperature were optimized for delignification, pulp yield and 2-furfural concentration. Response surface design analysis revealed that delignification yield increased with cooking time and temperature. Conclusion The multi-criteria optimization of delignification was used to find the ideal cooking conditions (5h07 min, 104.2°C) which could be satisfactory for the maximization of delignification (70.5%) and pulp yield (58.7%) and, to a lesser extent, for the minimization of 2-furfural production. Treatment conditions were found to influence the chemical structure of extracted lignins. Cooking time and temperature influenced inversely lignin molecular weights. [less ▲]

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See detailLignin extraction from Mediterranean agro-wastes: Impact of pretreatment conditions on lignin chemical structure and thermal degradation behavior
Manara, Panagiota; Zabaniotou, Anastasia; Vanderghem, Caroline ULg et al

in Catalysis Today (2014), 223

Three different types of Mediterranean, agro-industrial wastes (olive kernels, grape pomace/seeds, peach kernels), were subjected to two pretreatment processes, a chemical/organosolv and a physicochemical ... [more ▼]

Three different types of Mediterranean, agro-industrial wastes (olive kernels, grape pomace/seeds, peach kernels), were subjected to two pretreatment processes, a chemical/organosolv and a physicochemical one. The organosolv process included lignocellulosic biomass treatment with formic acid/acetic acid/water (30/50/20, v/v%), for 3 h at 107 °C, while the physicochemical method was conducted by immersing the biomass in a water/ethanol (8/92, v/v%), H2SO4 0.32 M, solvent and further exposing the slurry to microwave irradiation (maximum 250 W) for 1/2 h at 150 °C. Both processes were evaluated regarding the achieved delignification and the purity of the extracted lignins. The effect of the pretreatment processes onto the structure and thermal decomposition behavior of the extracted lignins was investigated via FT-IR and TGA analysis, respectively. The objective of the research work was to investigate potential valorization routes for these biomass agro-residues in the context of a biorefinery, focusing on lignin extraction. The pretreatment results showed that the obtained lignins, derived from both procedures, were of high purity (>82 wt%). Under the organosolv procedure, peach kernel delignification showed the maximum value (∼16 wt%), while under microwave pretreatment, olive kernel delignification showed the maximum value (∼35 wt%). Grape pomace/seeds appeared to be the most resistant in both treatments. [less ▲]

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See detailLignin as a raw material for industrial materials applications
Richel, Aurore ULg; Vanderghem, Caroline ULg; Jacquet, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2014)

Native lignin is an abundant biopolymer on earth and represents 15-30% by weight of the lignocellulosic biomass. Lignin is a heterogeneous cross-linked polymer composed of phenylpropane units (guaiacyl ... [more ▼]

Native lignin is an abundant biopolymer on earth and represents 15-30% by weight of the lignocellulosic biomass. Lignin is a heterogeneous cross-linked polymer composed of phenylpropane units (guaiacyl, syringyl or p-hydroxyphenyl) linked together by a panel of specific ether or carbon-carbon bonds.[1] Nowadays, large amounts of lignins and lignin-based wastes are available and originate either from the pulp and paper manufacturing or from the production of bioethanol from lignocellulose. [2] Typically, these lignins are dedicated to energetic purposes by combustion. In recent years however, novel axes for high added value applications have emerged and concern, notably, the use of lignin as performance products (e.g. polymer additives, binders) or specialty chemicals (e.g. surface-active agents) for materials applications.[3] Herein, several applications of lignin in materials sciences with industrial issues are presented. A correlation is established between the extraction processes from lignocellulosic materials and the chemical structure and physico-chemical properties of lignins.[4] Our research group has also developed new methodologies for the extraction of highly pure lignins from several starting materials, including food wastes, herbaceous raw materials and wood biomass. These methodologies include microwave-assisted extraction and two-step conventional pretreatment involving steam explosion. These methodologies are described in this presentation. [less ▲]

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See detailBio-based paints
Olive, Gilles ULg; Richel, Aurore ULg

Poster (2013, November 27)

Paints, at the coating meaning, are known since a long time. Typically, paint is a dispersion of one or more powders (pigments and fillers) in a macromolecular substance ("resin"), called film-forming ... [more ▼]

Paints, at the coating meaning, are known since a long time. Typically, paint is a dispersion of one or more powders (pigments and fillers) in a macromolecular substance ("resin"), called film-forming material, diluted in solvents. [less ▲]

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See detailOld inks: plant-based inks
Wymeersch, Noémie; Despy, Jessica; Bouchat, Isabelle et al

Poster (2013, November 27)

Thousands of years ago, natural pigments were discovered and they have been used ever since. Indeed, prehistoric people already used them to paint the walls of the caves in which they were living. A ... [more ▼]

Thousands of years ago, natural pigments were discovered and they have been used ever since. Indeed, prehistoric people already used them to paint the walls of the caves in which they were living. A significant example of this is the Cosquer cave (-19,000 to -27,000 years) located near Marseilles (France). Pigments and dyes can be classified into two broad categories: natural pigments and dyes and those called artificial. These categories are then subdivided into five families. The first one of these five families includes the mineral pigments. Among these we can find the clays (yellow ochre, red ochre, green clay, brown clay) and the stones like lapis lazuli (blue) and malachite (green). The second and third families gather the organic dyes and pigments. Those that have vegetal origins like indigo (blue), weld (yellow) and madder (red) compose the family 2 and those that have animal origins like cochineal (red) and kermes dyers (carmine) form the family 3. One family includes pigments and dyes stemming from chemical reactions such as verdigris or red lead (family 4) and the other one is made of the miscellaneous inks such as iron-gall type who are vegetal and mineral one (family 5). All these pigments, although they have been used for centuries, have been replaced by synthetic dyes from the oil industry at the end of the 19th century. Indeed, they have the advantage of reproducibility of the properties unlike natural pigments. But the scarcity of oil causes a renewed interest in natural preparations. In such purpose, our laboratory in conjunction with the Abbey of Villers-la-Ville has decided to study natural derivatives for inks and focuses in particular on the extraction of pigments from plants. [less ▲]

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See detailLignocellulosic biomass pretreatment impact on the extracted lignins chemical structure
Manara, Panagiota; Zabaniotou, Anastasia; Vanderghem, Caroline ULg et al

Poster (2013, October)

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See detailLignin as a raw material for industrial materials applications
Richel, Aurore ULg; Vanderghem, Caroline ULg; Jacquet, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2013, October)

Native lignin is an abundant biopolymer on earth and represents 15-30% by weight of the lignocellulosic biomass. Lignin is a heterogeneous cross-linked polymer composed of phenylpropane units (guaiacyl ... [more ▼]

Native lignin is an abundant biopolymer on earth and represents 15-30% by weight of the lignocellulosic biomass. Lignin is a heterogeneous cross-linked polymer composed of phenylpropane units (guaiacyl, syringyl or p-hydroxyphenyl) linked together by a panel of specific ether or carbon-carbon bonds.[1] Nowadays, large amounts of lignins and lignin-based wastes are available and originate either from the pulp and paper manufacturing or from the production of bioethanol from lignocellulose. [2] Typically, these lignins are dedicated to energetic purposes by combustion. In recent years however, novel axes for high added value applications have emerged and concern, notably, the use of lignin as performance products (e.g. polymer additives, binders) or specialty chemicals (e.g. surface-active agents) for materials applications.[3] Herein, several applications of lignin in materials sciences with industrial issues are presented. A correlation is established between the extraction processes from lignocellulosic materials and the chemical structure and physico-chemical properties of lignins.[4] Our research group has also developed new methodologies for the extraction of highly pure lignins from several starting materials, including food wastes, herbaceous raw materials and wood biomass. These methodologies include microwave-assisted extraction and two-step conventional pretreatment involving steam explosion. These methodologies are described in this presentation. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowth of Chlorella in vanillin enriched medium
Miazek, Krystian ULg; Goffin, Dorothée ULg; Richel, Aurore ULg

Poster (2013, August)

In this work the effect of different concentration of vanillin on the growth of Chlorella culture was evaluated. Two concentrations of vanillin: 60 mg/L and 300 mg/L in Bold Basal Medium (BBM) were tested ... [more ▼]

In this work the effect of different concentration of vanillin on the growth of Chlorella culture was evaluated. Two concentrations of vanillin: 60 mg/L and 300 mg/L in Bold Basal Medium (BBM) were tested and an inoculum from a two month Chlorella sp. (CCBA) culture was used. Vanillin at concentration of 60 mg/L showed to possess stimulating effect on Chlorella growth during 11 days of cultivation. Stimulation of Chlorella started on 3rd day of growth and was accompanied by 87% decrease of vanillin concentration within first 3 days of cultivation and its complete removal from growth media after 7 days. The acceleration of Chlorella growth in vanillin containing medium was detected due to biomass density, up to 1.2 times bigger than in the control culture, but also by measurement of chlorophyll content. Increased amount of chlorophyll content, up to 1.35 times higher than in control, was found between 4th and 11th day of cultivation. The response of Chlorella towards higher concentration of vanillin (300 mg/L) was different when compared to experiments where only 60 mg/L was used. During first 4 days of cultivation, strong inhibition of Chlorella exposed to 300 mg/L vanillin was observed and vanillin concentration maintained at the same initial concentration. During next days, a recovery effect occurred as biomass density and chlorophyll content gradually increased in comparison to the onset of growth and vanillin concentration decreased to 2 % of its initial value. Biomass density measured in Chlorella culture on 11th day was much higher than at the beginning of cultivation but still by 40% smaller than in control and by 50% smaller than in the culture growing in medium with 60 mg/L of vanillin. Chlorophyll content at the end of cultivation constituted 50% of control value and 35% of chlorophyll culture with 60 mg/L vanillin in medium. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact d'un fractionnement soustractif sur la relation structure-fonction de la gomme de caroube
Gillet, Sébastien ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg; Aguedo, Mario ULg et al

Poster (2013, July 02)

Le choix d'une température de fractionnement de la gomme de caroube va conditionner les caractéristiques des fractions obtenues et par conséquent les potentialité d'applications de ces dernières.

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See detailDéveloppement de nouveaux bioproduits générant une valeur ajoutée
Richel, Aurore ULg

Scientific conference (2013, May 30)

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See detailAmphiphilic structure-surface property relationships of monosaccharide-based surfactants
Razafindralambo, Hary ULg; Nicks, Francois ULg; Richard, Gaetan ULg et al

Poster (2013, April 08)

A set of monosaccharide-based renewable surfactants has been prepared, structurally checked, and systematically screened for different activities and functionalities. These compounds vary in the polar ... [more ▼]

A set of monosaccharide-based renewable surfactants has been prepared, structurally checked, and systematically screened for different activities and functionalities. These compounds vary in the polar head group, linker, and hydrophobic tail. Beyond the goal to find out the most potential valuable surfactants for each measurement, relationships between chemical structure, basic properties, and functionalities have been examined by comparing compounds differing in a single structural variable. In this paper, we show and explain the impact of the anomeric alpha or bêta, neutral or acid sugar derivatives, equatorial or axial position of hydroxyl group, alkyl chain substitute attachment position, number, and length on surface properties of sugar-based surfactants. [less ▲]

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See detailExtraction of lignin from Mediterranean agro-wastes: correlation between pretreatment conditions and lignin chemical structure
Manara, Panagiota; Zabaniotou, Anastasia; Richel, Aurore ULg

Conference (2013, January)

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See detailFast and high yield recovery of arabinose from destarched wheat bran
Aguedo, Mario ULg; Vanderghem, Caroline ULg; Goffin, Dorothée ULg et al

in Industrial Crops & Products (2013), 43

Enzymatically destarched wheat bran (DWB) contained 13.8% of arabinose and 23.1% xylose. Up to a maximum of 70% of the arabinose was progressively released from DWB when heated at 80 or 100°C in media ... [more ▼]

Enzymatically destarched wheat bran (DWB) contained 13.8% of arabinose and 23.1% xylose. Up to a maximum of 70% of the arabinose was progressively released from DWB when heated at 80 or 100°C in media acidified with HCl. Whereas microwave irradiation at higher temperatures in pressure vessels could lead to higher yields of extraction. A Box-Behnken experimental design established an efficient model describing the effects of temperature, irradiation duration and pH on arabinose extraction. The pH appeared as the most important factor of the process. 4-5 min of microwave heating at 150ºC and pH 1 appeared as a fast and highly efficient method to recover more than 90% of the arabinose of DWB. When plotting the percentages of arabinose against the combined severity factors LogR’0 (calculated from the temperature/duration/pH conditions applied), two different fitting profiles were obtained for both the heating techniques. Under microwave heating, high free xylose’s release could also occur. The experimental design led to a quadratic model predicting the release of xylose from DWB. A range of conditions enabled to minimize xylose and hydrolyze around 50% of the total arabinose, yielding a high purity fraction. An alternative would be to release more than 90% of both arabinose and xylose, for further arabinose purification or for a common valorization of both pentoses. [less ▲]

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See detailExtraction de molécules à haute valeur ajoutée dans un but de maximisation de la valeur créée
Richel, Aurore ULg

Conference (2013)

Les recherches académiques dans le domaine du bioraffinage sont présentées au travers de schémas complets de valorisation. Les matières premières ciblées sont les résidus agricoles et forestiers, les ... [more ▼]

Les recherches académiques dans le domaine du bioraffinage sont présentées au travers de schémas complets de valorisation. Les matières premières ciblées sont les résidus agricoles et forestiers, les cultures énergétiques et les résidus des industries alimentaires. Le cracking et la conversion ultérieure de ces matières premières permettent l'obtention de biocarburants, bioproduits ou nouvelles formulations (filière biomasse-chimie). [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of New Synthetic PEGylated Ferulic Acids in Comparison to Ferulic Acid and Commercial Surfactants on the Properties of Wheat Flour Dough and Bread
Nicks, Francois ULg; Richel, Aurore ULg; Dubrowski, Thomas ULg et al

in Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture (2013), 93(10), 2415-2420

BACKGROUND: Ferulic acid esterified with poly(ethylene glycol) with three different average molecular weights (200, 400 and 1000 g/mol) was studied in breadmaking. The effects of these antioxidants on the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Ferulic acid esterified with poly(ethylene glycol) with three different average molecular weights (200, 400 and 1000 g/mol) was studied in breadmaking. The effects of these antioxidants on the properties of wheat flour dough and bread were analyzed and compared with those obtained with ferulic acid and two commercial surfactants, diacetyl tartaric acid ester of mono- and diglycerides and sodium stearoyl lactylate. Farinographic and alveographic methods as well as weight, volume and bread firmness measurements were used for this purpose. <br /> <br />RESULTS: Such as ferulic acid, when the PEGylated derivatives were implemented in the dough (5000 ppm), it accelerated its breakdown and decreased its rheological properties. However, it allowed to avoid the important diminution of loaf volume observed when dough supplemented with ferulic acid was baked. That decrease in volume was related to the inhibition of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisae) by the unesterified ferulic acid. Moreover, two of the PEGylated ferulic acids even contributed to an increase of loaf volumes (5-6%) and demonstrated crumb softener properties. <br /> <br />CONCLUSION: The addition of ferulic acid in wheat flour dough caused the inhibition of the yeast, which resulted in decreased bread volume. That effect could be avoid by the esterification of ferulic acid with poly(ethylene glycol). [less ▲]

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See detailDispersion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in water by lignin
Rochez, Olivier; Zorzini, Gwendoline; Amadou, Julien et al

in Journal of Materials Science (2013), 48(14), 4962-4964

Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) can be stably dispersed in water with small amount of lignin. One-step dispersion in the 20.0 g/L concentration range is achieved at room temperature with excellent ... [more ▼]

Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) can be stably dispersed in water with small amount of lignin. One-step dispersion in the 20.0 g/L concentration range is achieved at room temperature with excellent electrical properties of MWCNT. Lignin is depicted to act as an anti-static agent. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (31 ULg)