References of "Rentier, Bernard"
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See detailAnimal models of VZV infection
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Rentier, Bernard ULg

in Gershon, Anne A.; Arvin, Ann M. (Eds.) Varicella-Zoster Virus : Virological and Clinical Management (2000)

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See detailChronic verrucous varicella zoster virus skin lesions: clinical, histological, molecular and therapeutic aspects
Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Snoeck, Robert; Rentier, Bernard ULg et al

in Clinical & Experimental Dermatology (1999), 24(5), 346-353

The outbreak of HIV infection introduced a new phenomenon in varicella zoster virus (VZV) pathology, namely the long-standing wart-like skin lesions that are frequently associated with resistance to ... [more ▼]

The outbreak of HIV infection introduced a new phenomenon in varicella zoster virus (VZV) pathology, namely the long-standing wart-like skin lesions that are frequently associated with resistance to thymidine kinase (TK)-dependent antiviral agents. This paper reviews the clinical, histological, and molecular aspects and the therapeutic management of these verrucous lesions. The majority of lesions are characterized by chronically evolving, unique or multiple wart-like cutaneous lesions. The main histopathological features include hyperkeratosis, verruciform acanthosis and VZV-induced cytopathic changes with scant or absent cytolysis of infected keratinocytes. The mechanism that establishes the chronic nature of the lesions appears to be associated with a particular pattern of VZV gene expression exhibiting reduced or nondetectable gE and gB synthesis. Drug resistance to TK-dependent antiviral agents is a result of nonfunctional or deficient viral TK. This necessitates alternative therapeutic management using antiviral agents that target the viral DNA polymerase. [less ▲]

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See detailOverview of the replication cycle of varicella-zoster virus
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Baudoux, Laurence; Defechereux, Patricia et al

in Schmidt, A.; Wolff, M. H.; Schünemann, S. (Eds.) Varicella-Zoster Virus : Molecular Biology, Pathogenesis and Clinical Aspects (1999)

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See detailLa transmission du virus de l’hépatite C en milieu hospitalier
Delwaide, Jean ULg; Gerard, Christiane ULg; Belaiche, Jacques ULg et al

in Médecine et Hygiène (1999), 57

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See detailHepatitis C virus transmission following invasive medical procedures
Delwaide, Jean ULg; Gerard, Christiane ULg; Vaira, Dolorès ULg et al

in Journal of Internal Medicine (1999), 245(1), 107-108

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See detailFactors involved in the bystander effect induced by Varicella zoster and Herpes simplex viral thymidine kinase suicide gene therapy
Grignet, Christine ULg; Cool, V.; Baudson, N. et al

in Journal of Gene Medicine (The) (1999), 1

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See detailPrevalence of hepatitis G virus in a haemodialysis unit
Lamproye, Anne ULg; Delwaide, Jean ULg; Vaira, Dolorès ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (1999), 62(1), 13-15

Background : Recently, a novel blood-borne virus has been identified and named hepatitis G virus. Transfusion is the main route of transmission. It is known that patients on maintenance dialysis are more ... [more ▼]

Background : Recently, a novel blood-borne virus has been identified and named hepatitis G virus. Transfusion is the main route of transmission. It is known that patients on maintenance dialysis are more susceptible to infections with parenterally-transmitted viruses than the general population. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of hepatitis G infection in a Belgian dialysis unit. Methods: The entire population of our dialysis unit (82 patients) was tested for the presence of hepatitis G virus (HGV) by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. History of transfusion or renal transplantation coinfections with hepatitis B and C viruses, and serum aminotransferase levels were also tested. Results: Thirteen patients (16%) were found positive for HGV-RNA. Among these patients, 69.2% were infected by the G virus alone, 15.4% were coinfected with B virus, and 15.4% with C virus. All but one patient had a history of transfusion. Ten of the thirteen infected patients (77%) had normal aminotransferase (< 30 UI/l). Three patients had elevated aminotransferase levels (23%); one was coinfected with B virus, one with C virus, and the last one had a diabetes-induced fatty liver infiltration. No liver biopsies were performed. Conclusions :It is concluded that infection with C virus is common among dialyzed patients. This high rate of infection could be related to previous transfusions, but may as well be due to nosocomial transmission. In our series, at least one patient has been contaminated by another road than transplantation or transfusion. Finally, it does not appear clearly that chronic infection with hepatitis G virus induces Liver disease, as defined by elevated aminotransferase level. [less ▲]

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See detailVaricella-zoster virus IE63, a virion component expressed during latency and acute infection, elicits humoral and cellular immunity
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Arvin, Ann M.; Rentier, Bernard ULg

in Journal of Infectious Diseases (1998), 178(Suppl. 1), 43-47

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) latency in human dorsal root ganglia is characterized by the transcription of large regions of its genome and by the expression of large amounts of some polypeptides, which ... [more ▼]

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) latency in human dorsal root ganglia is characterized by the transcription of large regions of its genome and by the expression of large amounts of some polypeptides, which are also expressed during lytic cycles. The immediate early 63 protein (IE63) is a virion component expressed very early in cutaneous lesions and the first viral protein detected during latency. Immune response against IE63 has been evaluated among naturally immune adults with a history of chickenpox: Specific antibodies were detected in serum, and most subjects who had a T cell proliferation with unfractionated VZV antigens had T cell recognition of purified IE63. The cytotoxic T cell (CTL) response to IE63 was equivalent to CTL recognition of IE62, the major tegument component of VZV, whose immunogenicity has been previously described. T cell recognition of IE63 and other VZV proteins is one of the likely mechanisms involved in controlling VZV reactivation from latency. [less ▲]

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See detailActivation of the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat by varicella-zoster virus IE4 protein requires nuclear factor-kB and involves both the amino-terminal and the carboxyl-terminal cysteine-rich region
Defechereux-Thibaut de Maisières, Patricia; Baudoux-Tebache, Laurence; Merville, Marie-Paule ULg et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (1998), 273(22), 13636-13644

Varicella-zoster virus open reading frame 4-encoded protein (IE4) possesses transactivating properties for varicella-zoster virus genes as well as for those of heterologous viruses such as the human ... [more ▼]

Varicella-zoster virus open reading frame 4-encoded protein (IE4) possesses transactivating properties for varicella-zoster virus genes as well as for those of heterologous viruses such as the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Mechanisms of HIV-1 LTR (long terminal repeat) transactivation were investigated in HeLa cells transiently transfected with an IE4 expression plasmid and a CAT reporter gene under the control of the HIV-1 LTR. These results demonstrated that IE4-mediated transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR in HeLa cells required transcription factor kappaB (NF-kappaB). Using the gel retardation assay, it was shown that transfection of the IE4 expression vector in HeLa cells was not associated with induction of NF-kappaB under the p50.p65 heterodimeric form and that no direct binding of IE4 to the kappaB sites could be detected. Both Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses suggested that the ability of IE4 to activate transcription through kappaB motives was not connected with its capacity to override the inhibitory activities of IkappaB-alpha or p105. Finally, in vitro protein-protein interactions involving IE4 and basal transcription factors such as TATA-binding protein and transcription factor IIB were carried out. A direct interaction between IE4 and TATA-binding protein or transcription factor IIB components of the basal complex of transcription was evidenced, as well as binding to the p50 and p65 NF-kappaB subunits. Mutagenesis analysis of IE4 indicated that the COOH-terminal cysteine-rich and arginine-rich regions (residues 82-182) were critical for transactivation, whereas the first 81 amino acids appeared dispensable. Moreover, the arginine-rich region is required for the in vitro binding activity, whereas the COOH-terminal end did not appear essential. [less ▲]

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See detailTransmission du virus de l'hépatite C par examens médicaux invasifs
DELWAIDE, Jean ULg; Gerard, Christiane ULg; Vaira, Dolorès ULg et al

in Gastroentérologie Clinique et Biologique (1998), 22(2), 172

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See detailLow-productive alpha-herpesviridae infection in chronic lichenoid dermatoses
Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Rentier, Bernard ULg et al

in Dermatology : International Journal for Clinical & Investigative Dermatology (1998), 196(4), 442-446

BACKGROUND: Herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) are responsible for various atypical mucocutaneous manifestations in the immunosuppressed population. One of the causative ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) are responsible for various atypical mucocutaneous manifestations in the immunosuppressed population. One of the causative pathomechanisms suggests an altered virus-host cell relationship. OBJECTIVE/METHODS: This report investigates by histology, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization the histological and virological features of 6 protracted, indolent HSV infections and 2 prolonged zoster infections. RESULTS: Histopathology revealed a lichenoid dermatitis in all patients. Specific HSV-1, HSV-2 and VZV in situ hybridization proved the viral origin of the cutaneous lesions. Immunohistochemical assessment demonstrated the intracellular presence of the HSV glycoproteins gB, gC and gD in epidermal keratinocytes which did not exhibit cytolysis. Similar findings were obtained for the VZV gE and gB. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that in some instances HSV and VZV infections may present a protracted disease course associated with a lichenoid inflammatory pattern and a non-cytolytic virus-host cell relationship. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysiopathologie et pathogenèse des douleurs zostériennes
Rentier, Bernard ULg

in Médecine et Maladies Infectieuses (1998), 28(Sp. Iss), 848-850

The origin of post-zosterian pain appears to be multiple. It implies: neuronal lesions in the central and peripheral nervous system. Young patients are less often affected than older individuals, perhaps ... [more ▼]

The origin of post-zosterian pain appears to be multiple. It implies: neuronal lesions in the central and peripheral nervous system. Young patients are less often affected than older individuals, perhaps because of damages that are caused or not to central afferences. Pain could be due to a central hyperexcitability induced and maintained by nociceptors. Antagonists of the NMDA receptor could thus prove efficient against installation of the chronic pain by interfering with neuronal discharges of the peripheral nociceptors and the induction of a hyperexcitability. [less ▲]

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See detailPrise en charge des infections à VZV
Groupe de consensus; Rentier, Bernard ULg

in Virologie (1998), 2(4), 317-323

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See detailSciences et Médecine à Liège à l'aube du troisième millénaire
Legros, Willy ULg; Rentier, Bernard ULg

in M S-Médecine Sciences (1998), 14(5), 535-536

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