References of "Reginster, Jean-Yves"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDiabetes is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis progression
Eymard, F; Parsons, C; Edwards, M et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2015), 23

Purpose Recent studies have suggested that metabolic factors (obesity, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia) and their clustering in metabolic syndrome (MetS) might be involved in the pathophysiology ... [more ▼]

Purpose Recent studies have suggested that metabolic factors (obesity, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia) and their clustering in metabolic syndrome (MetS) might be involved in the pathophysiology of knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated their impact on radiographic progression by an annualised measure of the joint space narrowing (JSN) of the medial tibiofemoral compartment. Methods 559 patients older than 50 years with symptomatic knee OA were recruited for the placebo arm of the SEKOIA trial. The presence of diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia was determined at baseline interview. BMI was calculated, obesity was considered >30 kg/m2. MetS was defined by the sum of metabolic factors ≥3. Minimal medial tibiofemoral joint space on plain radiographs was measured by an automated method at baseline and then annually for up to 3 years. Results The mean age of patients was 62.8 [62.2-63.4] years; 392 were women. A total of 43.8% was obese, 6.6% had type 2 diabetes, 45.1% hypertension, 27.6% dyslipidemia and 13.6% MetS. Mean annualised JSN was greater for patients with type 2 diabetes than without diabetes (0.26 [-0.35 - -0.17] vs. 0.14 [-0.16 - -0.12] mm; p=0.001). This association remained significant after adjustment for sex, age, BMI, hypertension and dyslipidemia (p=0.018). In subgroup analysis, type 2 diabetes was a significant predictor of JSN in males but not females. The other metabolic factors and MetS were not associated with annualised JSN. Conclusion Type 2 diabetes was a predictor of joint space reduction in men with established knee OA. No relationships were found between MetS or other metabolic factors and radiographic progression. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailExploring the Interest in and the Usage of the Internet Among Patients Eligible for Osteoporosis Screening.
Slomian, Justine ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Gaspard, Ulysse ULg et al

in Calcified tissue international (2015), 96

The aim of this study was to evaluate the interest in the Internet and its usage for health-related issues among people eligible for osteoporosis screening. Self-administered questionnaires have been ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the interest in the Internet and its usage for health-related issues among people eligible for osteoporosis screening. Self-administered questionnaires have been distributed to subjects who were screened for osteoporosis and to menopausal women. 177 patients have responded to the survey (64.5 +/- 10.1 years, 88.1 % of women). There are 78.5 % of Internet users. Among them, 67.2 % said searching information about their health and 74.5 % said using the Internet for this purpose. All respondents attributed an average score, out of 10, of 5.7 +/- 2.3 regarding the reliability of information that they could find on the Internet. The use of the Internet differs significantly depending on age: those who use the Internet are younger (62.1 +/- 8.91 years) than those who do not use it (73.3 +/- 9.42 years). The socioeconomic status also has an impact on the Internet use: Internet users have a higher education, are more professionally active and have a higher net monthly household income compared to the group of non-users. Even if age and socioeconomic status appear to be determining factors in the use of the Internet for the search of health information in patients eligible for osteoporosis screening, almost 75 % of the study population use the Internet for this purpose. Action to promote health through an Internet platform must therefore take these parameters into account. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (24 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTrabecular bone score (TBS) as a new complementary approach for osteoporosis evaluation in clinical practice.
Harvey, N. C.; Gluer, C. C.; Binkley, N. et al

in Bone (2015), 78

Trabecular bone score (TBS) is a recently-developed analytical tool that performs novel grey-level texture measurements on lumbar spine dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) images, and thereby captures ... [more ▼]

Trabecular bone score (TBS) is a recently-developed analytical tool that performs novel grey-level texture measurements on lumbar spine dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) images, and thereby captures information relating to trabecular microarchitecture. In order for TBS to usefully add to bone mineral density (BMD) and clinical risk factors in osteoporosis risk stratification, it must be independently associated with fracture risk, readily obtainable, and ideally, present a risk which is amenable to osteoporosis treatment. This paper summarizes a review of the scientific literature performed by a Working Group of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis. Low TBS is consistently associated with an increase in both prevalent and incident fractures that is partly independent of both clinical risk factors and areal BMD (aBMD) at the lumbar spine and proximal femur. More recently, TBS has been shown to have predictive value for fracture independent of fracture probabilities using the FRAX(R) algorithm. Although TBS changes with osteoporosis treatment, the magnitude is less than that of aBMD of the spine, and it is not clear how change in TBS relates to fracture risk reduction. TBS may also have a role in the assessment of fracture risk in some causes of secondary osteoporosis (e.g. diabetes, hyperparathyroidism and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis). In conclusion, there is a role for TBS in fracture risk assessment in combination with both aBMD and FRAX. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe position of Strontium ranelate in today's management of osteoporosis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Brandi, M.L; Cannata-Andia, J. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26

Osteoporosis accounts for about 3 % of total European health-care spending. The low proportion of costs for the pharmacological prevention of osteoporotic fracture means that it is highly cost saving ... [more ▼]

Osteoporosis accounts for about 3 % of total European health-care spending. The low proportion of costs for the pharmacological prevention of osteoporotic fracture means that it is highly cost saving, especially in patient with severe osteoporosis or patients who cannot take certain osteoporosis medications due to issues of contraindications or tolerability. Following recent regulatory changes, strontium ranelate is now indicated in patients with severe osteoporosis for whom treatment with other osteoporosis treatments is not possible, and without contraindications including uncontrolled hypertension, established, current or past history of ischaemic heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, and/or cerebrovascular disease. We review here today’s evidence for the safety and efficacy of strontium ranelate. The efficacy of strontium ranelate in patients complying with the new prescribing information (i.e. severe osteoporosis without contraindications) has been explored in a multivariate analysis of clinical trial data, which concluded that the antifracture efficacy of strontiumranelate is maintained in patients with severe osteoporosis without contraindications and also demonstrated how the new target population mitigates risk. Strontium ranelate is therefore an important alternative in today’s management of osteoporosis, with a positive benefit-risk balance, provided that the revised indication and contraindications are followed and cardiovascular risk is monitored. The bone community should be reassured that there remain viable alternatives in patients in whom treatment with other agents is not possible and protection against the debilitating effects of fracture is still feasible in patients with severe osteoporosis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCommentary on recent therapeutic guidelines for osteoarthritis
Cutolo, M; Berenbaum, F; Hochberg, M et al

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2015), 44

Background Despite availability of international evidence-based guidelines for osteoarthritis (OA) management, agreement on the different treatment modalities is lacking. Method A symposium of European ... [more ▼]

Background Despite availability of international evidence-based guidelines for osteoarthritis (OA) management, agreement on the different treatment modalities is lacking. Method A symposium of European and US OA experts was held within the framework of the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology to discuss and compare guidelines and recommendations for the treatment of knee OA and to reach a consensus for management, particularly for areas in which there is no clear consensus: non-pharmacological therapy; efficacy and safety of analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); intra-articular (i.a.) hyaluronates (HA); and the role of chondroitin sulfate (CS) and/or glucosamine sulfate (GS). Results All guidelines reviewed agree that knee OA is a progressive disease of the joint whose management requires non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches. Discrepancies between guidelines are few and mostly reflect heterogeneity of expert panels involved, geographical differences in the availability of pharmacotherapies, and heterogeneity of studies included. Panels chosen for guideline development should include experts with real clinical experience in drug use and patient management. Implementation of agreed guidelines can be thwarted by drug availability and reimbursement plans, resulting in optimal OA treatment being jeopardized, HA and symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SySADOAs) being clear examples of drugs whose availability and prescription can greatly vary geographically. In addition, primary care providers, often responsible for OA management (at least in early disease), may not adhere to clinical care guidelines, particularly for non-pharmacological OA treatment. Conclusion Harmonization of the recommendations for knee OA treatment is challenging but feasible, as shown by the step-by-step therapeutic algorithm developed by European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO). More easily disseminated and implemented guidance for OA treatment in the primary care setting is key to improved management of OA. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (26 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLa médecine personnalisée : aspects pharmacoéconomiques
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Ethgen, Olivier ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2015), 70(5-6), 339-342

Personalized medicine : pharmacoeconomic aspects Summary : The development and establishment of personalized medicine should allow the improvement of the quality of the care services as well as of the ... [more ▼]

Personalized medicine : pharmacoeconomic aspects Summary : The development and establishment of personalized medicine should allow the improvement of the quality of the care services as well as of the development of new and adapted therapeutic solutions. In a society, whose resources for health care are not endless, the issue of costs and economic effectiveness of personalized medicine is important. Numerous pharmacoeconomic studies have been conducted and many of them suggest that personalized medicine leads to better health, but at higher cost. However, the pharmacoeconomic methods developed over recent years will have to be adapted to better take into account the complexity of the problem, especially the capacity and the reliability of tests to best target patients, and also the whole care process of patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGlucosamine and chondroitin salts in the management of osteoarthritis in Europe
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 60-61

Detailed reference viewed: 80 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBaseline characteristics of the Liège hand osteoarthritis cohort (LIHOC)
Neuprez, Audrey ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Dardenne, Nadia ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 167

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPrevalence of frailty in nursing home residents according to various diagnostic tools
Buckinx, Fanny ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Dardenne, Nadia ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 160-161

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPercentage of women achieving non-osteoporotic BMD T-scores at the lumbar spine (LS) and total hip (TH) during up to 8 years of Denosumab (Dmab) treatment
Ferrari, S; Libanati, C; Lin, CJF et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 149-150

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHealth related quality of life in sarcopenia
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Slomian, Justine ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 148-149

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGrip fatigue resistance and self-perceived fatigue in relation with sarcopenia and quality of life
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Bautmans, I et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 147-148

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailClinical components linked to sarcopenia: the sarcophage study
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Petermans, Jean ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 144

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (18 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRecommendations for the registration of drugs to treat sarcopenia
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Cooper, C; Rizzoli, R et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 62

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan we identify patients to be treated in osteoarthritis?
Arden, NK; Richette, P; Cooper, C et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 61-62

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (4 ULg)