References of "Reginster, Jean-Yves"
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See detailLetter to the Editor.
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Seminars in arthritis and rheumatism (2015), 44(5), 15

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See detailBurden of frailty in the elderly population: perspectives for a public health challenge.
Buckinx, Fanny ULg; Rolland, Yves; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg et al

in Archives of public health = Archives belges de sante publique (2015), 73(1), 19-25

Frailty is a major health condition associated with ageing. Although the concept is almost universally accepted, its operational definition remains controversial. Anyway, this geriatric condition ... [more ▼]

Frailty is a major health condition associated with ageing. Although the concept is almost universally accepted, its operational definition remains controversial. Anyway, this geriatric condition represents a huge potential public health issue at both the patient and the societal levels because of its multiple clinical, societal consequences and its dynamic nature. Here, we review existing definitions and assessment tools for frailty, we highlight consequences of this geriatric condition and we discuss the importance of its screening and prevention to limit its public health burden. [less ▲]

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See detailCan we identify patients with high risk of osteoarthritis progression who will respond to treatment ? A focus on epidemiology and phenotype of osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Cooper, C; Arden, N et al

in Drugs & Aging (2015), 32(3), 179-187

Osteoarthritis is a syndrome affecting a variety of patient profiles. A European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis and the European Union Geriatric Medicine ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis is a syndrome affecting a variety of patient profiles. A European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society working meeting explored the possibility of identifying different patient profiles in osteoarthritis. The risk factors for the development of osteoarthritis include systemic factors (e.g., age, sex, obesity, genetics, race, and bone density) and local biomechanical factors (e.g., obesity, sport, joint injury, and muscle weakness); most also predict disease progression, particularly joint injury, malalignment, and synovitis/effusion. The characterization of patient profiles should help to better orientate research, facilitate trial design, and define which patients are the most likely to benefit from treatment. There are a number of profile candidates. Generalized, polyarticular osteoarthritis and local, monoarticular osteoarthritis appear to be two different profiles; the former is a feature of osteoarthritis comorbid with inflammation or the metabolic syndrome, while the latter is more typical of post-trauma osteoarthritis, especially in cases with severe malalignment. Other biomechanical factors may also define profiles, such as joint malalignment, loss of meniscal function, and ligament injury. Early- and late-stage osteoarthritis appear as separate profiles, notably in terms of treatment response. Finally, there is evidence that there are two separate profiles related to lesions in the subchondral bone, which may determine benefit from bone-active treatments. Decisions on appropriate therapy should be made considering clinical presentation, underlying pathophysiology, and stage of disease. Identification of patient profiles may lead to more personalized healthcare, with more targeted treatment for osteoarthritis. [less ▲]

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See detailAdded value of a triaxial accelerometer assessing gait parameters to predict falls and mortality among nursing home residents: A two-year prospective study.
Buckinx, Fanny ULg; Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Slomian, Justine ULg et al

in Technology and health care : official journal of the European Society for Engineering and Medicine (2015), 23

BACKGROUND: Gait impairment seems to be a risk factor for falls and mortality. Because gait change cannot be determined easily with classical clinical tests, some authors have suggested that it might be ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Gait impairment seems to be a risk factor for falls and mortality. Because gait change cannot be determined easily with classical clinical tests, some authors have suggested that it might be useful to use a gait-analysis system among elderly community-dwelling people. OBJECTIVE: The main objective of the present study was to determine the predictive value of a quantitative evaluation of the gait characteristics in nursing home residents for the occurrence of falls and death performed using a tri-axial accelerometer (Locometrix(R)). MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred elderly nursing home residents (80 women and 20 men, mean age 86.4 +/- 6.04 years) were included in this study with the aim to follow them for 2 years. Deaths and falls were systematically recorded. A quantitative evaluation of a 10-second walk was performed with a tri-axial accelerometer (Locometrix(R)). Demographic data (i.e age, sex, body mass index) and clinical data (i.e. fall risk evaluated by the Tinetti test) were also recorded. RESULTS: During the two years of follow-up, 27 patients died. After adjustment on all potential confounding variables, only body mass index was significantly associated with the risk of mortality with an odds ratio of 0.86 (95% CI: 0.77-0.96, p=0.04). At the end of the study period, 440 falls had occurred (mean: 4.44 +/- 6.79 falls per patient) but no single factors were independently associated with fall incidence. CONCLUSION: Our results show that a quantitative gait analysis performed using a tri-axial accelerometer is not predictive of long-term falls and mortality among nursing home residents. [less ▲]

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See detailA Systematic Review of Cost-Effectiveness Analyses of Drugs for Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Evers, Silvia M.; Ben Sedrine, Wafa et al

in PharmacoEconomics (2015), 33(3), 205-224

BACKGROUND: Given the limited availability of healthcare resources and the recent introduction of new anti-osteoporosis drugs, the interest in the cost effectiveness of drugs in postmenopausal ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Given the limited availability of healthcare resources and the recent introduction of new anti-osteoporosis drugs, the interest in the cost effectiveness of drugs in postmenopausal osteoporosis remains and even increases. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to identify all recent economic evaluations on drugs for postmenopausal osteoporosis, to critically appraise the reporting quality, and to summarize the results. METHODS: A literature search using Medline, the National Health Service Economic Evaluation database and the Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Registry was undertaken to identify original articles published between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2013. Studies that assessed cost effectiveness of drugs in postmenopausal osteoporosis were included. The Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS) statement was used to assess the quality of reporting of these articles. RESULTS: Of 1,794 articles identified, 39 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. They were conducted in 14 different countries and nine active interventions were assessed. When compared with no treatment, active osteoporotic drugs were generally cost effective in postmenopausal women aged over 60-65 years with low bone mass, especially those with prior vertebral fractures. Key drivers of cost effectiveness included individual fracture risk, medication adherence, selected comparators and country-specific analyses. Quality of reporting varied between studies with an average score of 17.9 out of 24 (range 7-21.5). CONCLUSION: This review found a substantial number of published cost-effectiveness analyses of drugs in osteoporosis in the last 6 years. Results and critical appraisal of these articles can help decision makers when prioritizing health interventions and can inform the development of future economic evaluations. [less ▲]

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See detailRetour au sport après plastie du ligament croisé antérieur : critères utilisés dans les cubs professionnels de football
Delvaux, François ULg; Rochcongar, P; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Science et Sports (2015), 30

Résumé Objectifs Analyser la démarche suivie par les médecins de clubs professionnels de football lorsqu’ils décident, en pratique quotidienne, d’autoriser le retour compétitif après plastie du ligament ... [more ▼]

Résumé Objectifs Analyser la démarche suivie par les médecins de clubs professionnels de football lorsqu’ils décident, en pratique quotidienne, d’autoriser le retour compétitif après plastie du ligament croisé antérieur chez un footballeur. Matériels et méthodes Trente-sept médecins responsables de clubs professionnels de football français et belges (Ligue 1, n = 15 ; Ligue 2, n = 14 ; Division 1 belge, n = 8) ont rempli un questionnaire à choix multiple concernant : (1) les critères utilisés afin de déterminer si un joueur est apte à reprendre la compétition après plastie du ligament croisé antérieur ; (2) l’importance relative de chacun de ces critères ; (3) le rôle éventuel d’intervenants spécifiques (kinésithérapeute…) dans cette décision. Résultats Plus de 80 % des médecins interrogés ont déclaré utiliser au moins huit critères (sur 17 proposés) afin d’évaluer la capacité d’un footballeur à reprendre la compétition après plastie du ligament croisé antérieur. Les trois critères considérés comme les plus déterminants étaient, par ordre d’importance : la stabilité dynamique du genou lors d’un exercice spécifique au football, la force musculaire et la récupération complète ou quasi complète d’amplitudes articulaires de flexion et d’extension de genou. Pour certains de ces critères (notamment la force musculaire), nous constatons cependant un manque de consensus sur les modalités pratiques d’évaluation, sur les paramètres ainsi que sur les valeurs-limites tolérées afin de garantir un retour sur terrain sécurisé. La prise en compte de l’avis du kinésithérapeute et du préparateur physique par une très nette majorité de médecins souligne l’importance d’un travail pluridisciplinaire. Conclusion L’utilisation de différents critères objectifs afin d’autoriser le retour compétitif après plastie du ligament croisé antérieur semble être une réalité dans le football professionnel. Des études supplémentaires devraient cependant contribuer à préciser les modalités des épreuves ainsi que des valeurs-seuils. ________________________________________ Summary Purpose To analyze how sport physicians decide, in their daily practice, when a professional soccer player with a reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament is able to get back to competitive activities. Materials and methods Thirty-seven physicians for professional French and Belgian soccer teams filled in a specific questionnaire dedicated to: (1) return-to-play criteria after anterior cruciate reconstruction; (2) the importance they assigned to each of these criteria in the return-to-play decision; (3) the potential role of professionals, such as physiotherapists or physical coaches in this decision. Results More than 80% of the respondents declared to use at least eight criteria in order to assess the player's ability to return to competitive soccer after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The most important ones were (in order of importance): dynamic knee stability during a specific soccer exercise, muscle strength performance and normalization of knee flexion and extension ranges of motion. For most of these criteria (notably muscle strength), there was a lack of consensus about the choice of assessment parameters and the limit values allowing physicians to authorize or forbid the return-to-competition. A large majority of participants stated to take into consideration advices from physiotherapists or physical coaches for the return-to-play decision. Conclusion Sport physicians of professional soccer teams use relevant criteria to assess players’ ability to return to full sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Further studies are required to determine the choice of assessment parameters and the limit values to assist physicians in return-to-play decisions. [less ▲]

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See detailDramatic osteonecrosis of the jaw associated with oral bisphosphonates, periodontitis and dental implant removal
Ayora, A F; HERION, Francine ULg; ROMPEN, Eric ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical Periodontology (2015), 42

Osteoporosis affects millions of elderly patients, and anti-resorptive drugs (ARD) such as bisphosphonates (BP) represent the first-line therapy. Despite the benefits related to the use of these ... [more ▼]

Osteoporosis affects millions of elderly patients, and anti-resorptive drugs (ARD) such as bisphosphonates (BP) represent the first-line therapy. Despite the benefits related to the use of these medications, osteonecrosis of the jaw is a significant complication in a subset of patients receiving these drugs. CASE PRESENTATION: This report documents a case of dramatic bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis associated with periodontitis and dental implant removal in an osteoporotic patient treated with per os bisphosphonates for an uninterrupted period of 15 years. CONCLUSION: The aim of this report was to discuss the administration period of BP in the treatment of osteoporosis, the decision-making and clinical management of severe MRONJ and the indications for dental implant placement in these specific patients. [less ▲]

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See detailOsteoporosis in patients taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: a focus on fracture outcome
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Endocrine (2015), 48(1), 65-68

Depression is one of the most important mental health problems and a leading cause of disability. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are considered as first-line therapy for the treatment of ... [more ▼]

Depression is one of the most important mental health problems and a leading cause of disability. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are considered as first-line therapy for the treatment of depressive symptoms among older adults because of their presumed favorable adverse effect profile. However, they could have deleterious effects on the bone. Evidence from longitudinal, crosssectional, and prospective cohort studies suggests that the use of antidepressants at therapeutic doses is associated with decreased bone mineral density and increased fracture risk. The association between SSRIs use and fracture risk could potentially differ depending on dose, exposure duration, time of exposure, age, or sex. However, the risk of fracture declined rapidly after discontinuation of use of SSRIs. The evidence now seems sufficient to consider adding SSRIs to the list of medications that contribute to osteoporosis. In practice, assessment of risk factor for osteoporosis or fractures could be made taking into account age, gender, duration, and severity of depression, length of SSRI treatments, and other concurrent risk factors. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of hyaluronic acid in the management of osteoarthritis : Evidence from real-life setting trials and surveys.
Maheu, E.; Rannou, F.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2015), 45

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) treatment algorithm recommends intra-articular (IA) hyaluronic acid (HA) for management of knee ... [more ▼]

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) treatment algorithm recommends intra-articular (IA) hyaluronic acid (HA) for management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) as second-line treatment in patients who remain symptomatic despite use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). This recommendation is based upon accumulating evidence that IA HA provides a significant benefit in knee OA. There is good evidence that IA HA injections reduce pain and increase function in knee OA, and the benefits are long-lasting as compared with IA corticosteroids. Evidence from real-life studies of repeat courses of IA HA demonstrates an improvement in pain or function lasting up to 40 months (12 months after the last injection cycle), a reduction in use of concomitant analgesia by up to 50%, and suggests that there may be a delay in the need for total knee replacement (TKR) of around 2 years. The clinical benefit of IA HA on knee OA may be 2-fold: (i) mechanical viscosupplementation of the joint (allowing lubrication and shock absorption) and (ii) the re-establishment of joint homeostasis through induction of endogenous HA production, which continues long after the exogenous injection has left the joint.The magnitude of the clinical effect may be different for different HA products, but this has not been proven so far and requires further investigation. IA HA injections are generally considered to be safe,although a slightly higher number of cases of local reactions and post-injection non-septic arthritis has been reported with high molecular weight cross-linked HAs. The use of IA HA in knee OA patients with mild–moderate disease, and for more severe patients wishing to delay TKR surgery,is recommended by the ESCEO taskforce. Further investigation into the OA patient types most likely to benefit from IA HA is warranted. Viscosupplementation with IA HA is a safe and effective component of the multi-modal management of knee OA. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of glucosamine sulfate in the management of osteoarthritis: Evidence from real-life setting trials and surveys.
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Altman, R.D.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2015), 45

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) treatment algorithm recommends chronic symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs ... [more ▼]

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) treatment algorithm recommends chronic symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs) including glucosamine sulfate (GS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) as first-line therapy for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Numerous studies are published on the use of SYSADOAs in OA; however, the efficacy of this class is still called into question largely due to the regulatory status, labeling and availability of these medications which differ substantially across the world. Examination of the evidence for the prescription patented crystalline GS (pCGS) formulation at a dose of 1500 mg once-daily demonstrates superiority overother GS and glucosamine hydrochloride (GH) formulations and dosage regimens. Thus, the ESCEO task force advocates differentiation of prescription pCGS over other glucosamine preparations. Long-term clinical trials andreal-life studies show that pCGS may delay joint structural changes, suggesting potential benefit beyond symptom control when used early in the management of knee OA. Real-life pharmacoeconomic studies demonstrate a long-term reduction in the need for additional pain analgesia and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with pCGS, with a significant reduction of over 50% in costs associated with medications, healthcare consultations and examinations over 12 months. Furthermore, treatment with pCGS for at least 12 months leads to a reduction in the need for total joint replacement for at least 5 years following treatment cessation. Thus, pCGS(1500 mg od) is a logical choice to maximize clinical benefit in OA patients, with demonstrated medium-term control of pain and lasting impact on disease progression. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of diet and exercise and of glucosamine sulfate in the prevention of knee osteoarthritis: Further results from the PRevention of knee Osteoarthritis in Overweight Females (PROOF) study.
Runhaar, J.; DEROISY, Rita ULg; van Middelkoop, M. et al

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2015), 45

Background and objectives: The PRevention of knee Osteoarthritis in Overweight Females(PROOF) study (ISRCTN42823086) described a trend for a decrease in the incidence of kneeo steoarthritis (OA) by a ... [more ▼]

Background and objectives: The PRevention of knee Osteoarthritis in Overweight Females(PROOF) study (ISRCTN42823086) described a trend for a decrease in the incidence of kneeo steoarthritis (OA) by a tailored diet and exercise program (DEP)or by oral glucosamine sulfate in women at risk for the disease, using a composite clinical and/or radiological outcome. The aim of this updated post-hoc analysis was to re-assess the results according to more precise techniques and take advantage of the 2 x 2 factorial design. Methods: A total of 407 overweight( BMI > or egal 27kg/m2) women of 50–60 years of age with no diagnosis of knee OA were randomized to: (1) noDEP + placebo(Control, N = 102), (2) DEP + placebo (DEP, N = 101), (3) glucosamine sulfate + no DEP (GS, N = 102), and (4) DEP + glucosamine sulfate (DEP + GS, N = 102) and followed for 2.5 years, with standardized postero-anterior, semiflexed (MTP) view knee radiographs at baseline and end of the study. DEP consisted of a tailored low fat and/or low caloric diet and easy to implement physical activities. Glucosamine was given as oral crystalline glucosamine sulfate 1500 mg once daily ,double-blinded vs. placebo. Incident knee OA was defined as radiographic progression of >1mm minimum joint space narrowing (mJSN)in the medial tibiofemoral compartment, as previously assessed by the visual (manual) technique and by a new semi-automated method. Logistic regression analysis was used t ocalculate the odds ratio for the effect of the interventions. Results: After 2.5 years, 11.8% of control subjects developed knee OA. This incidence was decreased with glucosamine sulfate, either alone or in combination with the DEP, but not by the DEP alone. Since there was no statistical interaction between treatments, the 2x2 factorial design allowed analysis of patients receiving glucosamine sulfate (N = 204) vs. those not receiving it (N= 203), similarly for those on the DEP (N = 203) or not (N = 204). Glucosamine sulfate significantly decreased the risk of developing knee OA: odds ratio (OR) = 0.41(95% CI: 0.20–0.85, P = 0.02) by the manual JSN assessment method and OR = 0.42 (95% CI:0.20–0.92, P =0.03) by the semi-automated technique. Conversely, there was no decrease in risk with the DEP. Conclusions: Glucosamine sulfate decreased the risk of developing radiographic knee OA over 2.5 years in overweight, middle-aged women at risk, as determined by medial mJSN progression. Conversely a tailored diet and exercise program exerted no preventive effect, possibly because of the lower than expected effect on weigh tloss. [less ▲]

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See detailA consensus statement on the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis - From evidence-based medicine to the real-life setting.
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Cooper, C.; Pelletier, J.P. et al

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2015), 45

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis(ESCEO) published a treatment algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in 2014,which provides ... [more ▼]

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis(ESCEO) published a treatment algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in 2014,which provides practical guidance for the prioritization of interventions. Further analysis of real-world data for OA provides additional evidence in support of pharmacological interventions,in terms of management of OA pain and function, avoidance of adverse events, disease-modifying effects and long-term outcomes, e.g., delay of total joint replacement surgery, and pharmacoeconomic factors such as reduction in healthcare resource utilization. This article provides an updated assessment of the literature for selected interventions in OA, focusing on real-life data, with the aim of providing easy-to-follow advice on how to establish a treatment flow in patients with knee OA in primary care clinical practice, in support of the clinicians’ individualized assessment of the patient. In step 1, background maintenance therapy with symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs) is recommended, for which high-quality evidence is provided only for the prescription formulations of patented crystalline glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate. Paracetamol may be added for rescue analgesia only,due to limited efficacy and increasing safety signals. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may provide additional symptomatic treatment with the same degree of efficacy as oral NSAIDs without the systemic safety concerns. Oral NSAIDs maintain a central role in step2 Advanced management of persistent symptoms. However, oral NSAIDs are highly heterogeneous in terms of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular safety profile, and patient stratification with careful treatment selection is advocated to maximize the risk: benefit ratio. Intra-articular hyaluronic acid as a next step provides sustained clinical benefit with effects lasting up to 6 months after a short-course of weekly injections. As a last step before surgery, thes low titration of sustained-release tramadol, aweak opioid, affords sustained analgesia with improved tolerability. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment and determinants of aesthetic discomfort in hand osteoarthritis
Neuprez, Audrey ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Dardenne, Nadia ULg et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2015), 74

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See detailIs there a specific pattern of lean/fat mass ratio in sarcopenic subjects?
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Journal of Frailty & Aging (2015), 4(S1), 61

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See detailAdherence to a standardized protocol for measuring grip strength and appropriate cut-off values in adults over 65 years with sarcopenia: a systematic review protocol.
FOX, B; HENWOOD, T.; SCHAAP, L. et al

in JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports (2015), 13(10), 50-59

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