References of "Reginster, Jean-Yves"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPartial adherence: a new perspective on health economic assessment in osteoporosis.
Kanis, J. A.; Cooper, C.; Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22(10), 2565-73

Partial adherence in osteoporosis increases the risk for fragility fracture and has considerable impact on cost-effectiveness. This review highlights a number of avenues for further research, such as ... [more ▼]

Partial adherence in osteoporosis increases the risk for fragility fracture and has considerable impact on cost-effectiveness. This review highlights a number of avenues for further research, such as improved definition of thresholds of compliance and persistence, as well as gap length, offset times, and fraction of benefit. INTRODUCTION: A number of economic models have been developed to evaluate osteoporosis therapies and support decisions regarding efficient allocation of health care resources. Adherence to treatment is seldom incorporated in these models, which may reduce their validity for decision-making since adherence is poor in real-world clinical practice. METHODS: An ad hoc working group of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis met to review key issues concerning the incorporation of partial adherence in health economic models. RESULTS: Observational data have shown that poor adherence is associated with an increase in the risk for fragility fracture. Health economic modelling indicates that full adherence is associated with more quality-adjusted life years gained than partial adherence, as well as higher treatment costs and lower fracture-related costs. Although adherence appears as an important driver of cost-effectiveness, the effect is dependent on a range of other variables, such as offset time, fraction of benefit, fracture risk, fracture efficacy, fracture-related costs, and drug cost, some of which are poorly defined. Current models used to evaluate cost-effectiveness in osteoporosis may oversimplify the contributions of compliance and persistence. CONCLUSION: Partial adherence has a significant impact on cost-effectiveness. Further research is required to optimise thresholds of compliance and persistence, the impact of gap length, offset times, and fraction of benefit. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRelationship between bone mineral density changes and risk of fractures among patients receiving calcium with or without vitamin D supplementation: a meta-regression
Rabenda, Véronique ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22

Surrogate measures of fracture risk, such as effects on bone mineral density, may be of great interest to assess the efficacy of available osteoporosis treatments. Our results suggest that bone mineral ... [more ▼]

Surrogate measures of fracture risk, such as effects on bone mineral density, may be of great interest to assess the efficacy of available osteoporosis treatments. Our results suggest that bone mineral density (BMD) changes cannot be used as a surrogate of anti-fracture efficacy, among patients receiving calcium, with or without vitamin D. Introduction: The purpose of this study is to examine the association between changes in bone mineral density with reduction in the risk of fractures in patients receiving calcium with or without vitamin D. Methods: We selected all randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials of calcium with or without vitamin D supplementation. To be included in this analysis, the studies were required to report both BMD (hip/proximal femur and/or lumbar spine) and the incidence of fractures. Metaregression analyses were used to examine the associations of changes in BMD with reduction in risk of fracture over the duration of each study. The change in BMD was the difference between changes (from baseline) observed in the active treatment group and placebo group. Results: A total of 15 randomized trials (n=47,365) were identified, most of whom (77%) came from the Women’s Health Initiative trial. Results show that larger increases in BMD at the lumbar spine were not associated with greater reduction in fracture risk. Concerning hip BMD changes, we found a statistically significant relationship between hip BMD changes and reduction in risk. However, results were not quite significant after excluding the both largest studies, in which BMD changes were measured in very small subset of patients. These points may have largely biased our results. Conclusions: In conclusion, there was no evidence of a relationship between BMD changes and reduction in risk of fractures among patients receiving calcium with or without vitamin D supplementation. Calcium and/or Vitamin D may reduce fracture rates through a mechanism independent of bone density. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (24 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA FRAX(R) model for the assessment of fracture probability in Belgium.
Johansson, H.; Kanis, J. A.; McCloskey, E. V. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22(2), 453-61

A country-specific FRAX(R) model was developed from the epidemiology of fracture and death in Belgium. Fracture probabilities were identified that corresponded to currently accepted reimbursement ... [more ▼]

A country-specific FRAX(R) model was developed from the epidemiology of fracture and death in Belgium. Fracture probabilities were identified that corresponded to currently accepted reimbursement thresholds. INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to evaluate a Belgian version of the WHO fracture risk assessment (FRAX(R)) tool to compute 10-year probabilities of osteoporotic fracture in men and women. A particular aim was to determine fracture probabilities that corresponded to the reimbursement policy for the management of osteoporosis in Belgium and the clinical scenarios that gave equivalent fracture probabilities. METHODS: Fracture probabilities were computed from published data on the fracture and death hazards in Belgium. Probabilities took account of age, sex, the presence of clinical risk factors and femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD). Fracture probabilities were determined that were equivalent to intervention (reimbursement) thresholds currently used in Belgium. RESULTS: Fracture probability increased with age, lower BMI, decreasing BMD T-score and all clinical risk factors used alone or combined. The 10-year probabilities of a major osteoporosis-related fracture that corresponded to current reimbursement guidelines ranged from approximately 7.5% at the age of 50 years to 26% at the age of 80 years where a prior fragility fracture was used as an intervention threshold. For women at the threshold of osteoporosis (femoral neck T-score = -2.5 SD), the respective probabilities ranged from 7.4% to 15%. Several combinations of risk-factor profiles were identified that gave similar or higher fracture probabilities than those currently accepted for reimbursement in Belgium. CONCLUSIONS: The FRAX(R) tool has been used to identify possible thresholds for therapeutic intervention in Belgium, based on equivalence of risk with current guidelines. The FRAX(R) model supports a shift from the current DXA-based intervention strategy, towards a strategy based on fracture probability of a major osteoporotic fracture that in turn may improve identification of patients at increased fracture risk. The approach will need to be supported by health economic analyses. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 98 (37 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSubtrochanteric fractures after long-term treatment with bisphosphonates: a European Society on Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis, and International Osteoporosis Foundation Working Group Report.
Rizzoli, R.; Akesson, K.; Bouxsein, M. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22

This paper reviews the evidence for an association between atypical subtrochanteric fractures and long-term bisphosphonate use. Clinical case reports/reviews and case-control studies report this ... [more ▼]

This paper reviews the evidence for an association between atypical subtrochanteric fractures and long-term bisphosphonate use. Clinical case reports/reviews and case-control studies report this association, but retrospective phase III trial analyses show no increased risk. Bisphosphonate use may be associated with atypical subtrochanteric fractures, but the case is yet unproven. INTRODUCTION: A Working Group of the European Society on Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis and the International Osteoporosis Foundation has reviewed the evidence for a causal association between subtrochanteric fractures and long-term treatment with bisphosphonates, with the aim of identifying areas for further research and providing recommendations for physicians. METHODS: A PubMed search of literature from 1994 to May 2010 was performed using key search terms, and articles pertinent to subtrochanteric fractures following bisphosphonate use were analysed. RESULTS: Several clinical case reports and case reviews report a possible association between atypical fractures at the subtrochanteric region of the femur in bisphosphonate-treated patients. Common features of these 'atypical' fractures include prodromal pain, occurrence with minimal/no trauma, a thickened diaphyseal cortex and transverse fracture pattern. Some small case-control studies report the same association, but a large register-based study and retrospective analyses of phase III trials of bisphosphonates do not show an increased risk of subtrochanteric fractures with bisphosphonate use. The number of atypical subtrochanteric fractures in association with bisphosphonates is an estimated one per 1,000 per year. It is recommended that physicians remain vigilant in assessing their patients treated with bisphosphonates for the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis and advise patients of the potential risks. CONCLUSIONS: Bisphosphonate use may be associated with atypical subtrochanteric fractures, but the case is unproven and requires further research. Were the case to be proven, the risk-benefit ratio still remains favourable for use of bisphosphonates to prevent fractures. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRanélate de strontium : efficacité à long terme sur 10 ans chez les femmes ménopausées ostéoporotiques
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Goemaere, S. et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2010, November), 77(Suppl.3), 99-100

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLe ranélate de strontium augmente la viabilité de chondrocytes humains stimulés par IL-1 bêta
Merville, Marie-Paule ULg; Deroyer, Céline ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2010, November), 77(Suppl.3), 222

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStrontium ranelate: a look back at its use for osteoporosis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Neuprez, Audrey ULg

in Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy (2010), 11(17), 2915-2927

Importance of the field: Osteoporosis is now considered as a major health problem in all developed and in most developing (non-African) coutries. Areas covered in this review: In the present review, we ... [more ▼]

Importance of the field: Osteoporosis is now considered as a major health problem in all developed and in most developing (non-African) coutries. Areas covered in this review: In the present review, we provide an extensive literature survey (MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Controlled Register), for articles dealing with osteoporosis management and/or strontium ranelate, from 1920 to 2010. What the reader will gain: The objective is to provide an extensive, unbiased assessment of the available data allowing to place strontium ranelate in perspective, with other anti-osteoporosis treatments. Take home message: Owing to a positive benefit/risk ratio, strontium ranelate may now be considered as a first-line treatment in the management of osteoporosis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTrend of hip fracture incidence in Belgium between 2000 and 2007 and future projections
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Detilleux, Johann ULg et al

in Value in Health (2010, November), 13(7), 303

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRelationship between changes in bone mineral density or bone turnover markers and vertebral fracture incidence in patients treated with bazedoxifene
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Detilleux, Johann ULg; Akadi, Chines et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2010, October), 62(10), 406-407

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLong-term denosumab treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis: results from the first year extension study of the FREEDOM trial
Chapurlat, R.; Papapoulos, Socrates; Bone, Henry G et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2010, October), 62(10), 903

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffectiveness of zoledronic acid in the prevention and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis in men and premenopausal women
Saag, k; Roux, C.; Devogelaer, J. P. et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2010, October), 62(10), 902-903

Detailed reference viewed: 145 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHealth-related quality of life after total knee or hip replacement: a 7-year prospective study
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Vanoverberghe, Marie ULg; Neuprez, Audrey ULg et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2010, June), 69(Suppl.3), 469

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (10 ULg)