References of "Reginster, Jean-Yves"
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See detailSafety observations from denosumab long-term extension and cross-over studies in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis
Bone, H. G.; Chapurlat, R.; Libanati, C. et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2011), 26(S1), 22-23

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See detailMaintenance of antifracture efficacy over 10 years with strontium ranelate in postmenopausal osteoporosis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Kaufman, J. M.; Devogelaer, J. P. et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2011), 63(S10), 436

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See detailNon-pharmacological management of osteoporosis: a consensus of the Belgian Bone Club
Body, J. J.; Bergmann, P.; Boonen, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22(11), 2769-88

This consensus article reviews the various aspects of the non-pharmacological management of osteoporosis, including the effects of nutriments, physical exercise, lifestyle, fall prevention, and hip ... [more ▼]

This consensus article reviews the various aspects of the non-pharmacological management of osteoporosis, including the effects of nutriments, physical exercise, lifestyle, fall prevention, and hip protectors. Vertebroplasty is also briefly reviewed. Non-pharmacological management of osteoporosis is a broad concept. It must be viewed as an essential part of the prevention of fractures from childhood through adulthood and the old age. The topic also includes surgical procedures for the treatment of peripheral and vertebral fractures and the post-fracture rehabilitation. The present document is the result of a consensus, based on a systematic review and a critical appraisal of the literature. Diets deficient in calcium, proteins or vitamin D impair skeletal integrity. The effect of other nutriments is less clear, although an excessive consumption of sodium, caffeine, or fibres exerts negative effects on calcium balance. The deleterious effects of tobacco, excessive alcohol consumption and a low BMI are well accepted. Physical activity is of primary importance to reach optimal peak bone mass but, if numerous studies have shown the beneficial effects of various types of exercise on bone mass, fracture data as an endpoint are scanty. Fall prevention strategies are especially efficient in the community setting, but less evidence is available about their effectiveness in preventing fall-related injuries and fractures. The efficacy of hip protectors remains controversial. This is also true for vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty. Several randomized controlled studies had reported a short-term advantage of vertebroplasty over medical treatment for pain relief, but these findings have been questioned by recent sham-controlled randomized clinical studies. [less ▲]

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See detailOstéroporose, le mal sournois
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Athena (2011), 276

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See detailThe clinical and economic burden of poor adherence with osteoporosis medications in Ireland
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; McGowan, Bernie; Bennett, Kathleen et al

in Value in Health (2011), 14

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See detailAntifracture efficacy of currently available therapies for postmenopausal osteoporosis.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Drugs (2011), 71(1), 65-78

Osteoporosis is a systemic bone disease characterized by low bone mass and bone mineral density, and deterioration of the underlying structure of bone tissue. These changes lead to an increase in bone ... [more ▼]

Osteoporosis is a systemic bone disease characterized by low bone mass and bone mineral density, and deterioration of the underlying structure of bone tissue. These changes lead to an increase in bone fragility and an increased risk for fracture, which are the clinical consequences of osteoporosis. The classical triad for consideration in osteoporosis is morbidity, mortality and cost. Vertebral fracture is an important source of morbidity in terms of pain and spinal deformity. On the other hand, hip fracture is associated with the worst outcomes and is widely regarded as a life-threatening event in the elderly; it is the source of the bulk of the cost of the disease in contemporary healthcare. The prevention of osteoporosis-associated fracture should include fall prevention, calcium supplementation and lifestyle advice, as well as pharmacological therapy using agents with proven antifracture efficacy. The most commonly used osteoporosis treatments in Europe are the bisphosphonates alendronate, risedronate, ibandronate and zoledronic acid; the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) raloxifene; teriparatide; and strontium ranelate. Recent additions include the biological therapy denosumab and the SERM bazedoxifene. In this review, we explore the antifracture efficacy of these agents with the aim of simplifying treatment decisions. These treatments can be broadly divided according to their mode of action. The antiresorptive agents include the bisphosphonates, the SERMs and denosumab, while the bone-forming agents include parathyroid hormone and teriparatide. Strontium ranelate appears to combine both antiresorptive and anabolic activities. We collated data on vertebral and hip fracture efficacy from the pivotal 3-year phase III trials, all of which had a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design. The relative reductions in risk in the osteoporosis trials range from 30% to 70% for vertebral fracture and 30% to 51% for hip fracture. This translates into 3-year number needed to treat values of between 9 and 21 for vertebral fracture and from 48 upwards for hip fracture. International guidelines agree that agents that have been shown to decrease vertebral, nonvertebral and hip fractures should be used preferentially over agents that only demonstrate vertebral antifracture efficacy. This is the case for alendronate, risedronate, zoledronic acid, denosumab and strontium ranelate. Finally, therapeutic decisions should be based on a balance between benefits and risks of treatment, which must be carefully considered in each particular case both by the physician and the patient. Indeed, no single agent is appropriate for all patients and, therefore, treatment decisions should be made on an individual basis, taking into account all measures of treatment effect and risk before making informed judgments about the best individual treatment option. [less ▲]

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See detailTraitement durant cinq ans par denosumab (DMAb) chez des femmes ménopausées ostéoporotiques : résultats d'efficacité des deux premières années de l'extension de l'essai FREEDOM
Chapurlat, R.; Roux, C.; Papapoulos, S. et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2011), 78(S5), 214

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See detailTaux sérique de vitamine D et réponse au traitement par alendronate
Roux, C.; Chartier, C.; Boonen, S. et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2011), 78(S5), 102

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See detailTreatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis for 5 years with denosumab : two-year results from the FREEDOM trial extension
Chapurlat, R.; Bone, H. G.; Brandi M L et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2011), 70(S3), 166-167

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See detailExtended safety observations from denosumab administration in postmenopausal women from FREEDOM and FREEDOM extension trials
Brown, J. P.; Bone, H. G.; Chapurlat, R. et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2011), 63(S10), 431-432

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See detailStrontium ranelate : an effective solution whatever the patient profiles
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22(S5), 756-757

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See detailEfficacy and safety of strontium ranelate in the treatment of knee ostoarthritis : a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled international trial
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Chapurlat, R.; Christiansen, C. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22(S5), 742-743

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See detailWhat's new on the horizon in therapy
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22(S5), 682

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See detailLong-term denosuamab treatment in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis : results from the first two years of the FREEDOM trial extension
Bone, H.; Chapurlat, R.; Brandi, M. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22(S4), 527-528

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See detailCurrent options for the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis.
LECART, Marie-Paule ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy (2011), 12(16), 2533-52

INTRODUCTION: Osteoporosis is a well-recognized disease with severe consequences if left untreated. The prevention of osteoporosis-associated fractures should include fall prevention, calcium ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Osteoporosis is a well-recognized disease with severe consequences if left untreated. The prevention of osteoporosis-associated fractures should include fall prevention, calcium supplementation and life-style advice, as well as pharmacological therapy using agents with proven antifracture efficacy. AREAS COVERED: This manuscript offers an evidence-based critical assessment of the currently available efficacy data on all new chemical entities that have been granted a marketing authorization for the management of primary osteoporosis in women. EXPERT OPINION: The availability of new therapeutic agents makes clinical decision making in osteoporosis more complex. Therapeutic decisions should be based on a balance between the benefits and risks of treatment, which must be carefully considered in each particular case, both by the physician and the patient. Indeed, no single agent is appropriate for all patients. Therefore, treatment decisions should be made on a tailor-made basis, taking into account all measures of treatment effect and risk, before making informed judgments about the best individual treatment option. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy of monthly oral ibandronate is sustained over 5 years: the MOBILE long-term extension study.
Miller, P. D.; Recker, R. R.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011)

The long-term efficacy and safety of once-monthly ibandronate were studied in this extension to the 2-year Monthly Oral Ibandronate in Ladies (MOBILE) trial. Over 5 years, lumbar spine bone mineral ... [more ▼]

The long-term efficacy and safety of once-monthly ibandronate were studied in this extension to the 2-year Monthly Oral Ibandronate in Ladies (MOBILE) trial. Over 5 years, lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) increased from baseline with monthly ibandronate 150 mg (8.4%). Long-term monthly ibandronate is effective and well tolerated for up to 5 years in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis. INTRODUCTION: Once-monthly therapy with ibandronate has been studied for up to 5 years in a long-term extension (LTE) to the 2 year MOBILE trial. METHODS: This multicenter, double-blind extension study of monthly ibandronate involved postmenopausal women who had completed 2 years of the MOBILE core study, with >/=75% adherence. Patients were reallocated, or were randomized from daily therapy, to ibandronate 100 mg monthly or 150 mg monthly for a further 3 years. RESULTS: A pooled intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis of 344 patients receiving monthly ibandronate from the core MOBILE baseline showed increases over 5 years in lumbar spine BMD (8.2% with 100 mg and 8.4% with 150 mg). Three-year data relative to MOBILE LTE baseline in the full ITT population of all 698 patients randomized or reallocated from MOBILE (including those previously on daily treatment) showed, on average, maintenance of proximal femur BMD gains achieved in the core 2-year study, with further small gains in lumbar spine BMD. In general, maintenance of efficacy was also indicated by markers of bone metabolism. CONCLUSIONS: There were no tolerability concerns or new safety signals. Monthly treatment with ibandronate 100 and 150 mg is effective and well tolerated for up to 5 years in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis. [less ▲]

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See detailRandomized trial of alendronate plus vitamin D3 versus standard care in osteoporotic postmenopausal women with vitamin D insufficiency.
Ralston, Stuart H; Binkley, Neil; Boonen, Steven et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2011), 88(6), 485-94

Vitamin D insufficiency is common in patients with osteoporosis. We conducted a randomized trial comparing alendronate 70 mg combined with vitamin D(3) 5,600 IU in a single tablet (ALN/D5600, n = 257 ... [more ▼]

Vitamin D insufficiency is common in patients with osteoporosis. We conducted a randomized trial comparing alendronate 70 mg combined with vitamin D(3) 5,600 IU in a single tablet (ALN/D5600, n = 257) with standard care chosen by the patients' personal physicians (n = 258) in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis (BMD T score </=2.5 or </=1.5 and a prior fragility fracture) who had vitamin D insufficiency (serum 25[OH]D values 8-20 ng/ml) and who were at risk of falls. Virtually all patients randomized to standard care received bisphosphonate therapy, and in approximately 70% of cases this was combined with vitamin D supplements. However, only 24% took >/=800 IU/day of supplemental vitamin D. At 6 months the proportion of patients with vitamin D insufficiency was 8.6% in the ALN/D5600 group compared with 31.0% in the standard care group (P < 0.001). Those in the ALN/D5600 group also had a greater reduction in urinary NTX/creatinine ratio (-57% vs. -46%, P < 0.001) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (-47% vs. -40%, P < 0.001). In the ALN/5600 group, by 12 months the increase in BMD was greater at the lumbar spine (4.9% vs. 3.9%, P = 0.047) and the total hip (2.2% vs. 1.4%, P = 0.035), significantly fewer patients were vitamin D-insufficient (11.3% vs. 36.9%, P < 0.001), and bone turnover marker (BTM) results were similar to those at 6 months. There was no difference between groups in those who experienced falls or fractures, and adverse events were similar. Based on the finding that ALN/D5600 was more effective than standard care at correcting vitamin D insufficiency, increasing BMD, and reducing BTMs in this patient group, greater attention needs to be directed toward optimizing the treatment of osteoporosis and correcting vitamin D deficiency in postmenopausal women. [less ▲]

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