References of "Reginster, Jean-Yves"
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See detailEfficacy and safety of strontium ranelate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis : a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled international trial
Cooper, C; Chapurlat, R; Christiansen, C et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2012), 71(3), 693

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See detailPost hoc analysis of a single IV infusion of zoledronic acid versus daily oral risedronate on lumbar spine bone mineral density in different subgroups with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis.
Roux, C.; Reid, D. M.; Devogelaer, J. P. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012), 23

This study summarizes the treatment effect of zoledronic acid infusion on lumbar spine bone mineral density in different subgroups with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Zoledronic acid is ... [more ▼]

This study summarizes the treatment effect of zoledronic acid infusion on lumbar spine bone mineral density in different subgroups with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Zoledronic acid is significantly more effective than risedronate in increasing lumbar spine (LS) bone mineral density (BMD) in both prevention and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. INTRODUCTION: In patients on glucocorticoids, a single zoledronic acid infusion significantly increased BMD versus daily oral risedronate. We assessed treatment effect on LS BMD in different patient subgroups at month 12 that contributed to the risk of osteoporosis in addition to glucocorticoids. METHODS: Patients randomized to a single IV infusion of zoledronic acid 5 mg or risedronate (5 mg/day) and stratified based on glucocorticoids duration [treatment (>3 months) and prevention (</=3 months) subpopulations] were subgrouped by age; gender; menopausal status in women; dose and duration of prednisone during the trial; and baseline serum 25-OH vitamin D, LS BMD T-score, creatinine clearance, and concomitant medication use. RESULTS: At month 12, zoledronic acid significantly increased LS BMD versus risedronate in patients </=74 years (P < 0.05) in the treatment and 65-74 years (P = 0.0008) in the prevention subpopulation. At month 12, zoledronic acid significantly increased LS BMD versus risedronate in both subpopulations irrespective of gender (all P < 0.05), cumulative prednisone dose (all P < 0.01), and postmenopausal status (all P < 0.05). In premenopausal women, in both subpopulations, zoledronic acid significantly increased total hip BMD (all P < 0.05) versus risedronate at month 12 but not LS BMD. Osteoporotic patients in the prevention (P = 0.0189) and osteopenic patients in the treatment subpopulation (P = 0.0305) showed significant LS BMD increases with zoledronic acid versus risedronate at month 12. CONCLUSIONS: This post hoc analysis suggests that zoledronic acid is significantly more effective than risedronate in increasing LS BMD in prevention and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis across a wide range of patients. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of collagen hydrolysate in articular pain: A 6-month randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Zegels, Brigitte ULg; Leonori, Lorenzo et al

in Complementary Therapies in Medicine (2012), 20

Objective: Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a food supplement made of collagen hydrolysate 1200 mg/day versus placebo during 6 months, in subjects with joint pain at the lower or upper limbs or at ... [more ▼]

Objective: Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a food supplement made of collagen hydrolysate 1200 mg/day versus placebo during 6 months, in subjects with joint pain at the lower or upper limbs or at the lumbar spine. Design: Comparative double-blind randomized multicenter study in parallel groups. Setting: 200 patients of both genders of at least 50 years old with joint pain assessed as ≥30 mm on a visual analogical scale (VAS). Intervention: Collagen hydrolysate 1200 mg/day or placebo during 6 months. Main outcome measure: Comparison of the percentage of clinical responder between the active collagen hydrolysate group and the placebo group after 6 months of study. A responder subject was defined as a subject experiencing a clinically significant improvement (i.e. by 20% or more) in the most painful joint using the VAS score. All analyses were performed using an intent-totreat procedure. Results: At 6 months, the proportion of clinical responders to the treatment, according to VAS scores, was significantly higher in the collagen hydrolysate (CH) group 51.6%, compared to the placebo group 36.5% (p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference between groups at 3 months (44.1% vs. 39.6%, p = 0.53). No significant difference in terms of security and tolerability was observed between the two groups. Conclusions: This study suggests that collagen hydrolysate 1200 mg/day could increase the number of clinical responders (i.e. improvement of at least 20% on the VAS) compared to placebo. More studies are needed to confirm the clinical interest of this food supplement. [less ▲]

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See detailThe importance of integrating medication adherence into pharmacoeconomic analyses: the example of osteoporosis.
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Boonen, Annelies; Rabenda, Véronique ULg et al

in Expert Reviews of Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes Research (2012), 12(2), 159-66

Adherence to medications is poor and suboptimal in many chronic diseases. Nonadherence can reduce treatment effectiveness and can have an impact on healthcare costs. As a consequence, it may alter the ... [more ▼]

Adherence to medications is poor and suboptimal in many chronic diseases. Nonadherence can reduce treatment effectiveness and can have an impact on healthcare costs. As a consequence, it may alter the cost-effectiveness of drug therapies. This article emphasizes the importance of integrating medication compliance and persistence into pharmacoeconomic evaluations, using osteoporosis as an example. A limited number of studies carried out to date have suggested important economic implications of poor adherence to osteoporosis medications. Therefore, compliance and persistence should be an integral part of clinical studies and pharmacoeconomic analyses in order to estimate the cost-effectiveness of drug therapies in current community practice. Measuring adherence and incorporating it into health economic modeling may, however, pose particular challenges. [less ▲]

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See detailMaintenance of antifracture efficacy over 10 years with strontium ranelate in postmenopausal osteoporosis.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Kaufman, J. M.; Goemaere, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012), 23

In an open-label extension study, BMD increased continuously with strontium ranelate over 10 years in osteoporotic women (P < 0.01). Vertebral and nonvertebral fracture incidence was lower between 5 and ... [more ▼]

In an open-label extension study, BMD increased continuously with strontium ranelate over 10 years in osteoporotic women (P < 0.01). Vertebral and nonvertebral fracture incidence was lower between 5 and 10 years than in a matched placebo group over 5 years (P < 0.05). Strontium ranelate's antifracture efficacy appears to be maintained long term. INTRODUCTION: Strontium ranelate has proven efficacy against vertebral and nonvertebral fractures, including hip, over 5 years in postmenopausal osteoporosis. We explored long-term efficacy and safety of strontium ranelate over 10 years. METHODS: Postmenopausal osteoporotic women participating in the double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 studies SOTI and TROPOS to 5 years were invited to enter a 5-year open-label extension, during which they received strontium ranelate 2 g/day (n = 237, 10-year population). Bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture incidence were recorded, and FRAX(R) scores were calculated. The effect of strontium ranelate on fracture incidence was evaluated by comparison with a FRAX(R)-matched placebo group identified in the TROPOS placebo arm. RESULTS: The patients in the 10-year population had baseline characteristics comparable to those of the total SOTI/TROPOS population. Over 10 years, lumbar BMD increased continuously and significantly (P < 0.01 versus previous year) with 34.5 +/- 20.2% relative change from baseline to 10 years. The incidence of vertebral and nonvertebral fracture with strontium ranelate in the 10-year population in years 6 to 10 was comparable to the incidence between years 0 and 5, but was significantly lower than the incidence observed in the FRAX(R)-matched placebo group over 5 years (P < 0.05); relative risk reductions for vertebral and nonvertebral fractures were 35% and 38%, respectively. Strontium ranelate was safe and well tolerated over 10 years. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term treatment with strontium ranelate is associated with sustained increases in BMD over 10 years, with a good safety profile. Our results also support the maintenance of antifracture efficacy over 10 years with strontium ranelate. [less ▲]

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See detailA reappraisal of generic bisphosphonates in osteoporosis.
Kanis, J. A.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Kaufman, J. M. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012), 23

The competitive price of generic bisphosphonates has had a marked effect on practice guidelines, but an increasing body of evidence suggests that they have more limited effectiveness than generally ... [more ▼]

The competitive price of generic bisphosphonates has had a marked effect on practice guidelines, but an increasing body of evidence suggests that they have more limited effectiveness than generally assumed. INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study is to review the impact of generic bisphosphonates on effectiveness in the treatment of osteoporosis. METHODS: This study is a literature review. RESULTS: A substantial body of evidence indicates that many generic formulations of alendronate are more poorly tolerated than the proprietary preparations which results in significantly poorer adherence and thus effectiveness. Poorer effectiveness may result from faster disintegration times of many generics that increase the likelihood of adherence of particulate matter to the oesophageal mucosa. Unfortunately, market authorisation, based on the bioequivalence of generics with a proprietary formulation, does not take into account the potential concerns about safety. The poor adherence of many generic products has implications for guideline development, cost-effectiveness and impact of treatment on the burden of disease. CONCLUSIONS: The impact of generic bisphosphonates requires formal testing to re-evaluate their role in the management of osteoporosis. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential effects of olanzapine and risperidone on plasma adiponectin levels over time: Results from a 3-month prospective open-label study.
Wampers, M.; Hanssens, L.; van Winkel, R. et al

in European neuropsychopharmacology : the journal of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (2012), 22

Second-generation antipsychotics (SGA), especially clozapine and olanzapine, are associated with an increased metabolic risk. Recent research showed that plasma adiponectin levels, an adipocyte-derived ... [more ▼]

Second-generation antipsychotics (SGA), especially clozapine and olanzapine, are associated with an increased metabolic risk. Recent research showed that plasma adiponectin levels, an adipocyte-derived hormone that increases insulin sensitivity, vary in the same way in schizophrenic patients as in the general population according to gender, adiposity and metabolic syndrome (MetS). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether different SGAs differentially affect plasma adiponectin levels independent of body mass index (BMI) and MetS status. 113 patients with schizophrenia (65.5% males, 32.3years old) who were free of antipsychotic medication were enrolled in this open-label prospective single-center study and received either risperidone (n=54) or olanzapine (n=59). They were followed prospectively for 12weeks. Average daily dose was 4.4mg/day for risperidone and 17.4mg/day for olanzapine. Plasma adiponectin levels as well as fasting metabolic parameters were measured at baseline, 6weeks and 12weeks. The two groups had similar baseline demographic and metabolic characteristics. A significant increase in body weight was observed over time. This increase was significantly larger in the olanzapine group than in the risperidone group (+7.0kg versus +3.1kg, p<0.0002). Changes in fasting glucose and insulin levels and in HOMA-IR, an index of insulin resistance, were not significantly different in both treatment groups. MetS prevalence increased significantly more in the olanzapine group as compared to the risperidone groups where the prevalence did not change over time. We observed a significant (p=0.0015) treatment by time interaction showing an adiponectin increase in the risperidone-treated patients (from 10,154 to 11,124ng/ml) whereas adiponectin levels decreased in olanzapine treated patients (from 11,280 to 8988ng/ml). This effect was independent of BMI and the presence/absence of MetS. The differential effect of antipsychotic treatment (risperidone versus olanzapine) on plasma adiponectin levels over time, independent of changes in waist circumference and antipsychotic dosing, suggests a specific effect on adipose tissues, similar to what has been observed in animal models. The observed olanzapine-associated reduction in plasma adiponectin levels may at least partially contribute to the increased metabolic risk of olanzapine compared to risperidone. [less ▲]

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See detailBisphosphonates and glucocorticoid osteoporosis in men: results of a randomized controlled trial comparing zoledronic acid with risedronate.
Sambrook, P. N.; Roux, C.; Devogelaer, J. P. et al

in BONE (2012), 50

BACKGROUND: We studied 265 men (mean age 56.4years; range 18-83years), among patients enrolled in two arms of a double-blind, 1-year study comparing the effects of zoledronic acid (ZOL) with risedronate ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: We studied 265 men (mean age 56.4years; range 18-83years), among patients enrolled in two arms of a double-blind, 1-year study comparing the effects of zoledronic acid (ZOL) with risedronate (RIS) in patients either commencing (prednisolone 7.5mg/day or equivalent) (prevention arm, n=88) or continuing glucocorticoid therapy (treatment arm, n=177). METHODS: Patients received either a single ZOL 5mg infusion or RIS 5mg oral daily at randomization, along with calcium (1000mg) and vitamin D (400-1200IU). Primary endpoint: difference in percentage change from baseline in bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine (LS) at 12months. Secondary endpoints: percentage changes in BMD at total hip (TH) and femoral neck (FN), relative changes in bone turnover markers (beta-CTx and P1NP), and overall safety. FINDINGS: In the treatment subpopulation, ZOL increased LS BMD by 4.7% vs. 3.3% for RIS and at TH the percentage changes were 1.8% vs. 0.2%, respectively. In the prevention subpopulation, bone loss was prevented by both treatments. At LS the percentage changes were 2.5% vs. -0.2% for ZOL vs. RIS and at TH the percentage changes were 1.1% vs. -0.4%, respectively. ZOL significantly increased lumbar spine BMD more than RIS at Month 12 in both the prevention population (p=0.0024) and the treatment subpopulation (p=0.0232) in men. In the treatment subpopulation, ZOL demonstrated a significantly greater reduction in serum beta-CTx and P1NP relative to RIS at all time-points. In the prevention subpopulation, ZOL significantly reduced beta-CTx at all time-points, and P1NP at Month 3 (p=0.0297) only. Both treatments were well tolerated in men, albeit with a higher incidence of influenza-like illness and pyrexia events post-infusion with ZOL. INTERPRETATION: Once-yearly ZOL preserves or increases BMD within 1year to a greater extent than daily RIS in men receiving glucocorticoid therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailEvolution récente de l'incidence des fractures de hanche et de la consommation de médicaments anti-ostéoporotiques en Belgique
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Roberfroid, D. et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2011, December), 78(Suppl. 5), 43-44

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See detailThe clinical and economic implications of non-adherence with osteoporosis medications in Ireland
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; McGowan, Bernie; Bennett, Kathleen et al

Conference (2011, November)

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See detailTumor-induced osteomalacia: The tumor may stay hidden!
van der Rest, Catherine; CAVALIER, Etienne ULg; KAUX, Jean-François ULg et al

in Clinical Biochemistry (2011), 44(14-15), 1264-6

We report the case of a patient with severe muscular and articular tenderness that caused almost complete immobility. This subject had severe hypophosphatemia due to hyperphosphaturia. Fibroblast growth ... [more ▼]

We report the case of a patient with severe muscular and articular tenderness that caused almost complete immobility. This subject had severe hypophosphatemia due to hyperphosphaturia. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) was abnormally high and the diagnostic of tumor-induced osteomalacia was made. Despite multiple tests, the tumor was not localized. In this report, we discuss different possible investigations to localize the tumor. Lastly, we review the potential therapy available when tumor is not found and can thus not be excised. [less ▲]

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See detailHypophosphatémie et ostéomalacie oncogénique
Van der Rest, Catherine; CAVALIER, Etienne ULg; COLSON, Laurent ULg et al

in Revue Médicale Suisse (2011), 7

In this article, we will discuss about hypophosphatemia due to tumor-induced osteomalacia. This disease is characterized by severe muscular and articular tenderness inducing profound walking limitation ... [more ▼]

In this article, we will discuss about hypophosphatemia due to tumor-induced osteomalacia. This disease is characterized by severe muscular and articular tenderness inducing profound walking limitation. Clinical chemistry results show severe hypophosphatemia due to hyperphosphaturia. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGG-23) is abnormally high. Physiological role of FGF-23 is examined. We also consider the pathophysiology of tumor induced osteomalacia, the use of different investigations to localize the tumor and therapies available to treat this rare disease. [less ▲]

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See detailCost-effectiveness of Denosumab compared with generic alendronate in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporotic women
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2011, March), 22(Suppl.1), 112-113

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See detailLong-term efficacy and safety of strontium ranelate in postmenopausal osteoporotic women: results over 10 years
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011, March), 22(Suppl.1), 110-111

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See detailHospitalisation costs of hip fractures in Belgium
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Gathon, Henry-Jean ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011, March), 22(Suppl.1), 332

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See detailPatient out-of-pocket contributions related to hip fracture hospital costs in Belgium
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Gathon, Henry-Jean ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011, March), 22(Suppl.1), 333

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