References of "Reginster, Jean-Yves"
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See detailOdanacatib anti-fracture efficacy and safety in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis: results from the phase III long-term odanacatib fracture trial
McClung, MR; Langdahl, B; Papapoulos, S et al

in Osteoporosis International (2014), 25(5), 573-575

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See detailAlgorithm for the symptomatic and structural treatment of osteoarthritis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2014), 25(5), 564

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See detailOdanacatib anti-fracture efficacy and safety in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis: results from the phase III long-term odanacatib fracture trial
McClung, MR; Langdahl, B; Papapoulos, S et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2014), 66(11), 987

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See detailPercentage of women achieving non-osteoporotic BMD T-scores at the spine and hip over 8 years of denosumab treatment
Ferrari, S; Libanati, C; Lin, CJF et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2014), 66(11), 986-987

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See detailAssociation between lean mass and hip bone mineral density
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Slomian, Justine ULg et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2014), 66(11), 95

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See detailGoal-directed treatment of osteoporosis in Europe.
Kanis, J. A.; McCloskey, E.; Branco, J. et al

in Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA (2014), 25(11), 2533-2543

Despite the proven predictive ability of bone mineral density, Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX(R)), bone turnover markers, and fracture for osteoporotic fracture, their use as targets for treatment of ... [more ▼]

Despite the proven predictive ability of bone mineral density, Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX(R)), bone turnover markers, and fracture for osteoporotic fracture, their use as targets for treatment of osteoporosis is limited. INTRODUCTION: Treat-to-target is a strategy applied in several fields of medicine and has recently become an area of interest in the management of osteoporosis. Its role in this setting remains controversial. This article was prepared following a European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) working group meeting convened under the auspices of the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) to discuss the feasibility of applying such a strategy in osteoporosis in Europe. METHODS: Potential targets range from the absence of an incident fracture to fixed levels of bone mineral density (BMD), a desired FRAX(R) score, a specified level of bone turnover markers or indeed changes in any one or a combination of these parameters. RESULTS: Despite the proven predictive ability of all of these variables for fracture (particularly BMD and FRAX), their use as targets remains limited due to low sensitivity, the influence of confounders and current lack of evidence that targets can be consistently reached. CONCLUSION: ESCEO considers that it is not currently feasible to apply a treat-to-target strategy in osteoporosis, though it did identify a need to continue to improve the targeting of treatment to those at higher risk (target-to-treat strategy) and a number of issues for the research agenda. These include international consensus on intervention thresholds and definition of treatment failure, further exploration of the relationship between fracture and BMD, and FRAX and treatment efficacy and investigation of the potential of short-term targets to improve adherence. [less ▲]

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See detailErratum to: Management of osteoporosis of the oldest old
Rizzoli, R; Branco, J; Brandi, ML et al

in Osteoporosis International (2014), 25

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See detailManagement of osteoporosis of the oldest old.
Rizzoli, R.; Branco, J.; Brandi, M.-L. et al

in Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA (2014), 25

This consensus article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in geriatric populations. Specifically, it reviews the risk assessment and intervention thresholds, the impact of nutritional ... [more ▼]

This consensus article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in geriatric populations. Specifically, it reviews the risk assessment and intervention thresholds, the impact of nutritional deficiencies, fall prevention strategies, pharmacological treatments and their safety considerations, the risks of sub-optimal treatment adherence and strategies for its improvement. INTRODUCTION: This consensus article reviews the therapeutic strategies and management options for the treatment of osteoporosis of the oldest old. This vulnerable segment (persons over 80 years of age) stands to gain substantially from effective anti-osteoporosis treatment, but the under-prescription of these treatments is frequent. METHODS: This report is the result of an ESCEO (European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis) expert working group, which explores some of the reasons for this and presents the arguments to counter these beliefs. The risk assessment of older individuals is briefly reviewed along with the differences between some intervention guidelines. The current evidence on the impact of nutritional deficiencies (i.e. calcium, protein and vitamin D) is presented, as are strategies to prevent falls. One possible reason for the under-prescription of pharmacological treatments for osteoporosis in the oldest old is the perception that anti-fracture efficacy requires long-term treatment. However, a review of the data shows convincing anti-fracture efficacy already by 12 months. RESULTS: The safety profiles of these pharmacological agents are generally satisfactory in this patient segment provided a few precautions are followed. CONCLUSION: These patients should be considered for particular consultation/follow-up procedures in the effort to convince on the benefits of treatment and to allay fears of adverse drug reactions, since poor adherence is a major problem for the success of a strategy for osteoporosis and limits cost-effectiveness. [less ▲]

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See detailOpportunity and challenges of eHealth and mHealth for patients and caregivers
Slomian, Justine ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Ethgen, Olivier ULg et al

in Austin Journal of Public Health and Epidemiology (2014), 1(2), 3-5

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See detailPrevalence of vitamin D inadequacy in European women aged over 80 years
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Slomian, Justine ULg; Beaudart, Charlotte ULg et al

in Archives of Gerontology & Geriatrics (2014), 59

Inadequate vitamin D status is associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism and increased bone turnover and bone loss, which in turn increases fracture risk. The objective of this study is to assess the ... [more ▼]

Inadequate vitamin D status is associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism and increased bone turnover and bone loss, which in turn increases fracture risk. The objective of this study is to assess the prevalence of inadequate vitamin D status in European women aged over 80 years. Assessments of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (25(OH)D) were performed on 8532 European women with osteoporosis or osteopenia of which 1984 were aged over 80 years. European countries included in the study were: France, Belgium, Denmark, Italy, Poland, Hungary, United Kingdom, Spain and Germany. Two cut-offs of 25(OH)D inadequacy were fixed: <75 nmol/L (30 ng/ml) and <50 nmol/L (20 ng/ml). Mean (SD) age of the patients was 83.4 (2.9) years, body mass index was 25.0 (4.0) kg/m2 and level of 25(OH)D was 53.3 (26.7) nmol/L (21.4 [10.7] ng/ml). There was a highly significant difference of 25(OH)D level across European countries (p < 0.0001). In these women aged over 80 years, the prevalence of 25(OH)D inadequacy was 80.9% and 44.5% when considering cut-offs of 75 and 50 nmol/L, respectively. In the 397 (20.0%) patients taking supplemental vitamin D with or without supplemental calcium, the mean serum 25(OH)D level was significantly higher than in the other patients (65.2 (29.2) nmol/L vs. 50.3 (25.2) nmol/L; P < 0.001). This study indicates a high prevalence of vitamin D (25(OH)D) inadequacy in old European women. The prevalence could be even higher in some particular countries. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of vitamin D in the elderly population : current status and perspectives
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; CAVALIER, Etienne ULg; Souberbielle, JC et al

in Archives of Public Health (2014), 72

Besides its well-known effect on bone metabolism, recent researches suggest that vitamin D may also play a role in the muscular, immune, endocrine, and central nervous systems. Double-blind RCTs support ... [more ▼]

Besides its well-known effect on bone metabolism, recent researches suggest that vitamin D may also play a role in the muscular, immune, endocrine, and central nervous systems. Double-blind RCTs support vitamin D supplementation at a dose of 800 IU per day for the prevention of falls and fractures in the senior population. Ecological, case–control and cohort studies have suggested that high vitamin D levels were associated with a reduced risk of autoimmune diseases, type 2 diabetes, cardio-vascular diseases and cancer but large clinical trials are lacking today to provide solid evidence of a vitamin D benefit beyond bone health. At last, the optimal dose, route of administration, dosing interval and duration of vitamin D supplementation at a specific target dose beyond the prevention of vitamin D deficiency need to be further investigated. [less ▲]

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See detailTraitement de l'osteoporose post-menopausique: quoi de neuf en 2014?
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Neuprez, A.; Lecart, M. P. et al

in Revue medicale de Liege (2014), 69(7-8), 441-53

Management of osteoporosis involves both non pharmacological approaches, including changes in lifestyle and dietary habits combined, in patients at high risk of fracture or presenting with an established ... [more ▼]

Management of osteoporosis involves both non pharmacological approaches, including changes in lifestyle and dietary habits combined, in patients at high risk of fracture or presenting with an established osteoporosis, to the use of drugs. Besides supplementation in calcium and vitamin D (at daily doses of 1 gr and 800 IU) in patients whose dietary intakes do not cover the recommended daily allowances, medications to be used for the management of osteoporosis may include inhibitors of bone resorption (bisphosphonates, denosumab and selective estrogen receptor modulators), stimulators of bone formation (teriparatide) or chemical entities decreasing bone resorption and stimulating bone formation (strontium ranelate). The selection of a particular medication, for a single individual patient, will depend on the severity of the disease as well as on the patient's believes and expectations. Local, skeletal and systemic tolerance of the various drugs should also be taken into account. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of dietary protein and vitamin D in maintaining musculoskeletal health in postmenopausal women : A consensus statement from the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO)
Rizzoli, R; Stevenson, JC; Bauer, JM et al

in Maturitas (2014), 79

From 50 years of age, postmenopausal women are at an increased risk of developing sarcopenia and osteoporosis as a result of deterioration of musculoskeletal health. Both disorders increase the risk of ... [more ▼]

From 50 years of age, postmenopausal women are at an increased risk of developing sarcopenia and osteoporosis as a result of deterioration of musculoskeletal health. Both disorders increase the risk of falls and fractures. The risk of developing sarcopenia and osteoporosis may be attenuated through healthy lifestyle changes, which include adequate dietary protein, calcium and vitamin D intakes, and regular physical activity/exercise, besides hormone replacement therapy when appropriate. Protein intake and physical activity are the main anabolic stimuli for muscle protein synthesis. Exercise training leads to increased muscle mass and strength, and the combination of optimal protein intake and exercise produces a greater degree of muscle protein accretion than either intervention alone. Similarly, adequate dietary protein intake and resistance exercise are important contributors to the maintenance of bone strength. Vitamin D helps to maintain muscle mass and strength as well as bone health. These findings suggest that healthy lifestyle measures in women aged >50 years are essential to allow healthy ageing. The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) recommends optimal dietary protein intake of 1.0–1.2 g/kg body weight/d with at least 20–25 g of high-quality protein at each main meal, with adequate vitamin D intake at 800 IU/d to maintain serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels >50 nmol/L as well as calcium intake of 1000 mg/d, alongside regular physical activity/exercise 3–5 times/week combined with protein intake in close proximity to exercise, in postmenopausal women for prevention of age-related deterioration of musculoskeletal health. [less ▲]

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See detailReturn-to-play critera after hamstring injury: actual medicine practice professional soccer teams
Delvaux, François ULg; Rochcongar, p; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Journal of Sports Science & Medicine (2014), 13

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See detailEffect of denosumab treatment in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis: eight-year results from the freedom extension, phase 3 clinical trial
Lewieck, E; Papapoulos, S; Lippuner, K et al

in Endocrine Reviews (2014), 35(3), 22-1

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See detailDenosumab for the treatment of men with low bone mineral density: 24-month results from the Adamo Trial
Langdahl, B; Teglbjaerg, C; Ho, PR et al

in Endocrine Reviews (2014), 35(3), 22-1

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See detailThe quantified patient: a patient participatory culture.
Appelboom, Geoff; LoPresti, Melissa; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg et al

in Current medical research and opinion (2014)

Abstract The Quantified Self Movement, which aims to improve various aspects of life and health through recording and reviewing daily activities and biometrics, is a new and upcoming practice of self ... [more ▼]

Abstract The Quantified Self Movement, which aims to improve various aspects of life and health through recording and reviewing daily activities and biometrics, is a new and upcoming practice of self monitoring that holds much promise. Now, the most underutilized resource in ambulatory health care, the patient, can participate like never before, and the patient's Quantified Self can be directly monitored and remotely accessed by health care professionals. [less ▲]

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See detailSmart wearable body sensors for patient self-assessment and monitoring
Appelboom, G; Camacho, E; Abraham, M et al

in Archives of Public Health (2014), 72

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See detailCardiac concerns associated with strontium ranelate.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Expert opinion on drug safety (2014), 13(9), 1-5

Introduction: Strontium ranelate is proven to reduce vertebral and non-vertebral fracture risk in osteoporosis. Concerns about cardiac safety have led to a new contraindication to strontium ranelate in ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Strontium ranelate is proven to reduce vertebral and non-vertebral fracture risk in osteoporosis. Concerns about cardiac safety have led to a new contraindication to strontium ranelate in patients with uncontrolled hypertension and/or current or past history of ischaemic heart disease, peripheral arterial disease and/or cerebrovascular disease. Areas covered: A literature search was performed; data were also collected from the European Medicines Agency website. Randomised controlled trial (RCT) data indicate a higher incidence of non-adjudicated myocardial infarction (MI) with strontium ranelate versus placebo (1.7 vs 1.1%; odds ratio [OR]: 1.6; 95% CI: 1.07 - 2.38; p = 0.020) (Mantel-Haenzel estimate of the OR). There was no increase in cardiovascular mortality. MI risk was mitigated by excluding patients with cardiovascular contraindications (OR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.48 - 2.04; p = 0.988). Three observational studies performed in the context of real-life medical practice in the UK and Denmark did not report a signal. Expert opinion: The increased risk for cardiac events with strontium ranelate has been detected in RCTs but not in real life. Excluding patients with cardiovascular contraindications appears to be an effective measure for controlling the risk of MI. Strontium ranelate remains a useful therapeutic alternative in patients with severe osteoporosis without cardiovascular contraindications who are unable to take another osteoporosis treatment. [less ▲]

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