References of "Reginster, Jean-Yves"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCost-effectiveness of bazedoxifene compared with raloxifene in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporotic women.
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Ben Sedrine, Wafa ULg; REGINSTER, Jean-Yves ULg

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2013), 28(4), 807-15

Bazedoxifene is a novel selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. In addition to the therapeutic value of a new agent, evaluation of the cost ... [more ▼]

Bazedoxifene is a novel selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. In addition to the therapeutic value of a new agent, evaluation of the cost-effectiveness compared with relevant alternative treatment(s) is an important consideration to facilitate healthcare decision making. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of bazedoxifene compared with raloxifene for the treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. The cost-effectiveness of treatment for 3 years with bazedoxifene was compared with raloxifene using an updated version of a previously validated Markov microsimulation model. Analyses were conducted from a Belgian healthcare payer perspective and, the base-case population was women (aged 70 years) with bone mineral density T-score </= -2.5. The effects of bazedoxifene and raloxifene on fracture risk were derived from the 3-year results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled and active-controlled study, including postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. The cost-effectiveness analysis based on efficacy data from the overall clinical trial indicated that bazedoxifene and raloxifene were equally cost-effective. When the results were examined based on the subgroup analysis of women at higher risk of fractures, bazedoxifene was dominant (lower cost for higher effectiveness) compared with raloxifene in most of the simulations. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of the results, which were largely independent of starting age of treatment, fracture risk, cost, and disutility. In addition, when the cost of raloxifene was reduced by one-half or when incorporating the raloxifene effects on reducing breast cancer, bazedoxifene remained cost-effective, at a threshold of euro35,000 per quality-adjusted life-years gained, in 85% and 68% of the simulations, respectively. Under the assumption of improved antifracture efficacy of bazedoxifene over raloxifene in women with high risk of fractures, this study suggests that bazedoxifene can be considered cost-effective, and even dominant, when compared with raloxifene in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporotic women. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNutrition and bone health : turning beliefs into knowledge for healthy behaviour
Brandi, ML; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 388-389

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInhibition of sclerostin with romosozumab in postmenopausal women with low BMD : phase 2 trial results
McClung, M; Grauer, A; Boonen, S et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 38-39

Detailed reference viewed: 91 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPatients' preferences for osteoporosis drug therapy : a discrete choice experiment
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Dellaert, B; Dirksen, C et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 53

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPharmacological management : osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, similarities and differences
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 75-76

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe general approach to the patient with osteoarthritis : is a treatment algorithm feasible ?
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 385

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStrontium ranelate effect on knee osteoarthritis progression : a MRI analysis
Genant, HK; Zaim, S; Guermazi, A et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 312-313

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStrontium ranelate prevents radiological progression in patients with primary knee osteoarthritis
Cooper, C; Berembaum, F; Nash, P et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 306-307

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIndirect comparison of bazedoxifene vs. oral bisphosphonates for the prevention of vertebral fractures in postmenopausal osteoporotic women
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Ellis, AG; Luo, X et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 37

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailACP Journal Club: supplementation with vitamin D did not reduce cartilage volume loss or pain in knee osteoarthritis.
REGINSTER, Jean-Yves ULg; Pelousse, Franz

in Annals of Internal Medicine (2013), 158(8), 9

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVitamin D supplementation in elderly or postmenopausal women: a 2013 update of the 2008 recommendations from the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO).
Rizzoli, R.; Boonen, S.; Brandi, M.-L. et al

in Current Medical Research & Opinion (2013), 29(4), 305-13

Abstract Background: Vitamin D insufficiency has deleterious consequences on health outcomes. In elderly or postmenopausal women, it may exacerbate osteoporosis. Scope: There is currently no clear ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background: Vitamin D insufficiency has deleterious consequences on health outcomes. In elderly or postmenopausal women, it may exacerbate osteoporosis. Scope: There is currently no clear consensus on definitions of vitamin D insufficiency or minimal targets for vitamin D concentrations and proposed targets vary with the population. In view of the potential confusion for practitioners on when to treat and what to achieve, the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) convened a meeting to provide recommendations for clinical practice, to ensure the optimal management of elderly and postmenopausal women with regard to vitamin D supplementation. Findings: Vitamin D has both skeletal and extra-skeletal benefits. Patients with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-(OH)D) levels <50 nmol/L have increased bone turnover, bone loss, and possibly mineralization defects compared with patients with levels >50 nmol/L. Similar relationships have been reported for frailty, nonvertebral and hip fracture, and all-cause mortality, with poorer outcomes at <50 nmol/L. Conclusion: The ESCEO recommends that 50 nmol/L (i.e. 20 ng/mL) should be the minimal serum 25-(OH)D concentration at the population level and in patients with osteoporosis to ensure optimal bone health. Below this threshold, supplementation is recommended at 800 to 1000 IU/day. Vitamin D supplementation is safe up to 10,000 IU/day (upper limit of safety) resulting in an upper limit of adequacy of 125 nmol/L 25-(OH)D. Daily consumption of calcium- and vitamin-D-fortified food products (e.g. yoghurt or milk) can help improve vitamin D intake. Above the threshold of 50 nmol/L, there is no clear evidence for additional benefits of supplementation. On the other hand, in fragile elderly subjects who are at elevated risk for falls and fracture, the ESCEO recommends a minimal serum 25-(OH)D level of 75 nmol/L (i.e. 30 ng/mL), for the greatest impact on fracture. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHealth Economics Analyses in Osteoporosis
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Arinoviche Schenker, Roberto; Arriagada Maldini, Marina (Eds.) Temas de osteoporosis y otras enfermedades oseas (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (20 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects of 3 months of short sessions of controlled whole body vibrations on the risk of falls among nursing home residents
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Maquet, Didier ULg; Mannarino, Mélanie et al

in BMC Geriatrics (2013), 13(42),

Background: Fatigue, lack of motivation and low compliance can be observed in nursing home residents during the practice of physical activity. Because exercises should not be too vigorous, whole body ... [more ▼]

Background: Fatigue, lack of motivation and low compliance can be observed in nursing home residents during the practice of physical activity. Because exercises should not be too vigorous, whole body vibration could potentially be an effective alternative. The objective of this randomized controlled trial was to assess the impact of 3-month training by whole body vibration on the risk of falls among nursing home residents. Methods: Patients were randomized into two groups: the whole body vibration group which received 3 training sessions every week composed of 5 series of only 15 seconds of vibrations at 30 Hz frequency and a control group with normal daily life for the whole study period. The impact of this training on the risk of falls was assessed blindly by three tests: the Tinetti Test, the Timed Up and Go test and a quantitative evaluation of a 10-second walk performed with a tri-axial accelerometer. Results: 62 subjects (47 women and 15 men; mean age 83.2 ± 7.99 years) were recruited for the study. No significant change in the studied parameters was observed between the treated (n=31) and the control group (n=31) after 3 months of training by controlled whole-body-vibrations. Actually, the Tinetti test increased of + 0.93 ± 3.14 points in the treated group against + 0.88 ± 2.33 points in the control group (p = 0.89 when adjusted). The Timed Up and Go test showed a median evolution of - 1.14 (− 4.75-3.73) seconds in the treated group against + 0.41 (− 3.57- 2.41) seconds in the control group (p = 0.06). For the quantitative evaluation of the walk, no significant change was observed between the treated and the control group in single task as well as in dual task conditions. Conclusions: The whole body vibration training performed with the exposition settings such as those used in this research was feasible but seems to have no impact on the risk of falls among nursing home residents. Further investigations, in which, for example, the exposure parameters would be changed, seem necessary [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (15 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRelationship between use of antidepressants and risk of fractures: a meta-analysis
Rabenda, Véronique ULg; Nicolet, Delphine ULg; Beaudart, Charlotte ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24

Summary It has been shown that antidepressants would have a direct action on bone metabolism and would be associated with increased fracture risk. Results from this large meta-analysis show that both ... [more ▼]

Summary It has been shown that antidepressants would have a direct action on bone metabolism and would be associated with increased fracture risk. Results from this large meta-analysis show that both SSRIs and TCAs are associated with a moderate and clinically significant increase in the risk of fractures of all types. Introduction This study seeks to investigate the relationship between use of antidepressants and the risk of fracture. Methods An exhaustive systematic research of case–control and cohort studies published or performed between 1966 and April 2011 that reported risk estimates of fracture associated with use of antidepressants was performed using MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Systematic Review Database, manual review of the literature, and congressional abstracts. Inclusion, quality scoring, and data abstraction were performed systematically by three independent reviewers. Results A total of 34 studies (n01,217,464 individuals) were identified. Compared with non-users, the random effects pooled RR of fractures of all types, among antidepressant users, were 1.39 (95%CI 1.32–1.47). Use of antidepressants were associated with a 42 %, 47 %, and 38 % risk increase in non-vertebral, hip, and spine fractures, respectively ([For non-vertebral fractures: RR01.42, 95%CI 1.34–1.51]; [For hip fractures: RR01.47, 95%CI 1.36–1.58]; [For spine fractures: RR01.38, 95%CI 1.19–1.61]). Studies examining SSRI use showed systematically a higher increase in the risk of fractures of all types, non-vertebral, and hip fractures than studies evaluating TCA use. Conclusions Results from this large meta-analysis show that both SSRIs and TCAs are associated with a moderate and clinically significant increase in the risk of fractures of all types. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (23 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEuropean guidance for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women.
Kanis, J. A.; McCloskey, E. V.; Johansson, H. et al

in Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA (2013), 24(1), 23-57

Guidance is provided in a European setting on the assessment and treatment of postmenopausal women at risk of fractures due to osteoporosis. INTRODUCTION: The International Osteoporosis Foundation and ... [more ▼]

Guidance is provided in a European setting on the assessment and treatment of postmenopausal women at risk of fractures due to osteoporosis. INTRODUCTION: The International Osteoporosis Foundation and European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis published guidance for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in 2008. This manuscript updates these in a European setting. METHODS: Systematic literature reviews. RESULTS: The following areas are reviewed: the role of bone mineral density measurement for the diagnosis of osteoporosis and assessment of fracture risk, general and pharmacological management of osteoporosis, monitoring of treatment, assessment of fracture risk, case finding strategies, investigation of patients and health economics of treatment. CONCLUSIONS: A platform is provided on which specific guidelines can be developed for national use. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTreatment of osteoporosis in men.
Kaufman, JM; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Boonen, S et al

in BONE (2013), 53(1), 134-44

SUMMARY: Aspects of osteoporosis in men, such as screening and identification strategies, definitions of diagnosis and intervention thresholds, and treatment options (both approved and in the pipeline ... [more ▼]

SUMMARY: Aspects of osteoporosis in men, such as screening and identification strategies, definitions of diagnosis and intervention thresholds, and treatment options (both approved and in the pipeline) are discussed. INTRODUCTION: Awareness of osteoporosis in men is improving, although it remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. A European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) workshop was convened to discuss osteoporosis in men and to provide a report by a panel of experts (the authors). METHODS: A debate with an expert panel on preselected topics was conducted. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Although additional fracture data are needed to endorse the clinical care of osteoporosis in men, consensus views were reached on diagnostic criteria and intervention thresholds. Empirical data in men display similarities with data acquired in women, despite pathophysiological differences, which may not be clinically relevant. Men should receive treatment at a similar 10-year fracture probability as in women. The design of mixed studies may reduce the lag between comparable treatments for osteoporosis in women becoming available in men. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIs there potential for strontium ranelate in the management of osteoarthritis ?
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Pelousse, Franz; Bruyère, Olivier ULg

in Clinical Practice (2013), 10(2), 201-207

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEquivalence of a single dose (1200 mg) compared to a three-time a day dose (400 mg) of chondroitin 4&6 sulfate in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Results of a randomized double blind placebo controlled study.
Zegels, Brigitte ULg; Crozes, P.; Uebelhart, D. et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2013), 21(1), 22-27

OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a single oral dose of a 1200 mg sachet of chondroitin 4&6 sulfate (CS 1200) vs three daily capsules of chondroitin 4&6 sulfate 400 mg (CS 3*400 ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a single oral dose of a 1200 mg sachet of chondroitin 4&6 sulfate (CS 1200) vs three daily capsules of chondroitin 4&6 sulfate 400 mg (CS 3*400) (equivalence study) and vs placebo (superiority study) during 3 months, in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). DESIGN: Comparative, double-blind, randomized, multicenter study, including 353 patients of both genders over 45 years with knee OA. Minimum inclusion criteria were a Lequesne index (LI) >/= 7 and pain >/= 40 mm on a visual analogue scale (VAS). LI and VAS were assessed at baseline and after 1-3 months. Equivalence between CS was tested using the per-protocol procedure and superiority of CS vs placebo was tested using an intent-to-treat procedure. RESULTS: After 3 months of follow-up, no significant difference was demonstrated between the oral daily single dose of CS 1200 formulation and the three daily capsules of CS 400. Patients treated with CS 1200 or CS 3*400 were significantly improved compared to placebo after 3 months of follow-up in terms of LI (<0.001) and VAS (P < 0.01). No significant difference in terms of security and tolerability was observed between the three groups. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that a daily administration of an oral sachet of 1200 mg of chondroitin 4&6 sulfate allows a significant clinical improvement compared to a placebo, and a similar improvement when compared to a regimen of three daily capsules of 400 mg of the same active ingredient. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOstéomalacie hypophosphatémique hyperphosphaturique avec hypersécrétion de FGF-23
COLSON, Laurent ULg; Vander Rest, Catherine; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg et al

in Lettre du Rhumatologue (La) (2012), 387

Detailed reference viewed: 105 (35 ULg)
Full Text
See detailNécessité de nouveaux critères de remboursement pour traiter l'ostéoporose en Belgique
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Bergmann, Pierre; Body, Jean-Jacques et al

in Ortho-Rhumato (2012), 10(5), 3

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (4 ULg)