References of "Reginster, Jean-Yves"
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See detailTibial subchondral sclerosis is significantly correlated with long-term (3-year) radiological progression of knee osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Henrotin, Yves ULg; Honoré, Aline et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 5(Suppl.1), 412

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See detailTibial subchondral sclerosis and femoral osteophytes are linked to symptomatic and structural severity of knee osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Henrotin, Yves ULg; Honoré, Aline et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 5(Suppl.1), 411

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See detailRelationship between subchondral tibial bone mineral density and joint space width at the medial femoro-tibial compartment in patients with knee osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Lejeune, Eric; Dardenne, Charles-Bernard et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 5(Suppl.1), 411

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See detailMeasurement of the tibial subchondral bone mineral density: a potential tool for diagnosis and monitoring of knee osteoarthrits
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Zegels, Brigitte ULg; Dardenne, Charles-Bernard et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 5(Suppl.1), 411

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See detailRespective value of four biochemical markers of bone resorption for the diagnosis of postmenopausal osteoporosis and the monitoring of anti-resorptive therapies
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Taquet, A. N.; Christiansen, C. et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 5(Suppl.1), 421

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See detailMeasurement of the tibial subchondral bone mineral density: a potential tool for diagnosis and monitoring of knee osteoarthrits
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Zegels, Brigitte ULg; Dardenne, Charles-Bernard et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2001), 9(Suppl.B), 61

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See detailRadiographic severity of knee osteoarthrits is highly correlated with future progression of the disease
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Ethgen, Olivier ULg; Rovati, Lucio C et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2001), 9(Suppl.B), 44-45

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See detailRelationship between subchondral tibial bone mineral density and joint space width at the medial femoro-tibial compartment in patients with knee osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Lejeune, Eric; Dardenne, Charles-Bernard et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2001), 9(Suppl.B), 23

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See detailTibial subchondral sclerosis is significantly correlated with long-term (3-year) radiological progression of knee osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Henrotin, Yves ULg; Honoré, Aline et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2001), 9(Suppl.B), 23

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See detailTibial subchondral sclerosis and femoral osteophytes are linked to symptomatic and structural severity of knee osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Henrotin, Yves ULg; Honoré, Aline et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2001), 9(Suppl.B), 22

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See detailImportance of social companionship in the determination of health-related quality of life in hip and knee osteoarthrits
Ethgen, Olivier ULg; Van Parijs, P.; Delhalle, S. et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2001), 9(Suppl.B), 19-20

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See detailWHO Collaborating Centre consensus meeting on anti-cytokine therapy in rheumatoid arthritis
Emery, P.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Appelboom, T. et al

in Rheumatology (2001), 40(6), 699-702

Severe adult rheumatoid arthritis is a cause of progressive disability and increased mortality across Europe. A cure for the disease remains elusive, but control of symptoms and maintenance of individual ... [more ▼]

Severe adult rheumatoid arthritis is a cause of progressive disability and increased mortality across Europe. A cure for the disease remains elusive, but control of symptoms and maintenance of individual independence is possible. Anti-cytokine therapies offer a new approach to disease management. They are effective after the failure of full doses of methotrexate, and are at least as effective as methotrexate in retarding the progression of radiological changes. Until more is known about the long-term safety and efficacy of these drugs they should be reserved for patients with severe disease who are progressing despite adequate doses of methotrexate or other disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. They should be continued until therapeutic failure or intolerance. A comprehensive health economic evaluation is needed to optimally direct the use of these drugs. This should be undertaken when long-term safety and efficacy studies are completed. [less ▲]

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See detailStrontium ranelate increases cartilage matrix formation.
Henrotin, Yves ULg; Labasse, Alain; Zheng, S. X. et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2001), 16(2), 299-308

Based on previous studies showing that strontium ranelate (S12911) modulates bone loss in osteoporosis, it could be hypothesized that this drug also is effective on cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis ... [more ▼]

Based on previous studies showing that strontium ranelate (S12911) modulates bone loss in osteoporosis, it could be hypothesized that this drug also is effective on cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis (OA). This was investigated in vitro on normal and OA human chondrocytes treated or not treated with interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). This model mimics, in vitro, the imbalance between chondroformation and chondroresorption processes observed in vivo in OA cartilage. Chondrocytes were isolated from cartilage by enzymatic digestion and cultured for 24-72 h with 10(-4)-10(-3) M strontium ranelate, 10(-3) M calcium ranelate, or 2 x 10(-3) M SrCl2 with or without IL-1beta or insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). Stromelysin activity and stromelysin quantitation were assayed by spectrofluorometry and enzyme amplified sensitivity immunoassay (EASIA), respectively. Proteoglycans (PG) were quantified using a radioimmunoassay. Newly synthesized glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were quantified by labeled sulfate (Na2(35)SO4) incorporation. This method allowed the PG size after exclusion chromatography to be determined. Strontium ranelate, calcium ranelate, and SrCl2 did not modify stromelysin synthesis even in the presence of IL-1beta. Calcium ranelate induced stromelysin activation whereas strontium compounds were ineffective. Strontium ranelate and SrCl2 both strongly stimulated PG production suggesting an ionic effect of strontium independent of the organic moiety. Moreover, 10(-3) M strontium ranelate increased the stimulatory effect of IGF-I (10(-9) M) on PG synthesis but did not reverse the inhibitory effect of IL-1beta. Strontium ranelate strongly stimulates human cartilage matrix formation in vitro by a direct ionic effect without stimulating the chondroresorption processes. This finding provides a preclinical basis for in vivo testing of strontium ranelate in OA. [less ▲]

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