References of "Reginster, Jean-Yves"
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See detailPharma clinics. Comment je traite.... L'arthrose. 2eme partie: Nouvelles perspectives therapeutiques
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Henrotin, Yves ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2001), 56(3), 135-9

Besides the management of symptoms of osteoarthritis, a lot of interest was raised for molecules aiming at slowing down the structural progression of the disease. This paper summarizes the currently ... [more ▼]

Besides the management of symptoms of osteoarthritis, a lot of interest was raised for molecules aiming at slowing down the structural progression of the disease. This paper summarizes the currently available data allowing to discuss the efficacy and tolerance of these chemical entities. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of Daily Calcium and Vitamin D Supplementation on Parathyroid Hormone Secretion
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Zegels, Brigitte ULg; Lejeune, Emmanuelle ULg et al

in Gynecological Endocrinology : The Official Journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology (2001), 15(1), 56-62

Calcium and vitamin D supplementation have been shown to reduce secondary hyperparathyroidism and play a role in age-related osteoporosis. In order to define the optimal regimen of calcium and vitamin D ... [more ▼]

Calcium and vitamin D supplementation have been shown to reduce secondary hyperparathyroidism and play a role in age-related osteoporosis. In order to define the optimal regimen of calcium and vitamin D supplementation to produce the maximal inhibition of parathyroid hormone secretion, we compared the administration of a calcium-vitamin D supplement as a single morning dose with the administration of two divided doses at 6-hour intervals. Twelve healthy male volunteers were assigned to three investigational procedures, which were alternated at weekly intervals. After a 'blank' control procedure, when they were not exposed to any supplements, they received one of two calcium-vitamin D supplement regimens: either two doses of Orocal D3 (500 mg calcium and 400 IU vitamin D3) with a 6-hour interval between doses, or one water-soluble effervescent powder pack of Cacit vitamin D3, taken in the morning (1000 mg calcium and 880 IU vitamin D3). During the three procedures (control and the two calcium-vitamin D supplementation protocols), veinous blood was drawn every 60 minutes for up to 9 hours, for serum calcium and parathyroid hormone measurements. The order of administration of the two calcium and vitamin D supplementation regimens was allocated by randomization. No significant changes in serum calcium were observed during the study. During the first 6 hours following calcium-vitamin D supplementation, a statistically significant decrease in serum parathyroid hormone was observed with both regimens, compared with baseline and the control procedure. During this first period, no differences were observed between the two treatment regimens. However, between the 6th and the 9th hour, serum parathyroid hormone levels remained significantly decreased compared to baseline with the twice-daily Orocal D3 administration, while they returned to baseline values with the once-daily Cacit D3 preparation. During this period, the percentage decrease in serum parathyroid hormone relative to baseline was significantly greater with Orocal D3 than Cacit D3 (p = 0.0021). We therefore conclude that the twice-daily administration of 500 mg calcium and 400 IU vitamin D3 at 6-hour intervals provides a more prolonged decrease in serum parathyroid hormone levels than the administration of the same total amount of calcium and vitamin D, as a single morning dose in young healthy. [less ▲]

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See detailPharma clinics. Comment je traite.... L'arthrose. 1ère partie: Rappel physiopathologique et traitement symptomatique
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Henrotin, Yves ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2001), 56(2), 63-7

Osteoarthritis is now considered in all developed countries as a major burden for public health. During several years, the pharmacological management of osteoarthritis mainly focused on symptoms relief ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis is now considered in all developed countries as a major burden for public health. During several years, the pharmacological management of osteoarthritis mainly focused on symptoms relief without interaction with the long-term structural progression of this disease. Based on recently published consensus, the present article summarizes the currently available options in the symptom-modifying management of osteoarthritis. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of High Doses of Oral Risedronate (20 Mg/Day) on Serum Parathyroid Hormone Levels and Urinary Collagen Cross-Link Excretion in Postmenopausal Women with Spinal Osteoporosis
Zegels, Brigitte ULg; Eastell, R.; Russell, R. G. et al

in BONE (2001), 28(1), 108-12

The present study describes the biological effects of risedronate, a pyridinyl bisphosphonate, on bone and assesses the safety and tolerability of risedronate when given at high doses, with or without ... [more ▼]

The present study describes the biological effects of risedronate, a pyridinyl bisphosphonate, on bone and assesses the safety and tolerability of risedronate when given at high doses, with or without calcium, to postmenopausal women with spinal osteoporosis. This single-center descriptive, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, parallel group study included 32 postmenopausal white women with at least one radiographically confirmed vertebral compression fracture. Patients were randomized to one of four different dose regimen groups: (i) R-P, risedronate 20 mg/day for 14 days, followed by placebo for 42 days; (ii) R-CP-P, risedronate 20 mg/day for 14 days, followed by elemental calcium 1000 mg/day and placebo for 14 days, then by placebo for 28 days; (iii) R-CP-R-CP, risedronate 20 mg/day for 7 days, followed by elemental calcium 1000 mg/day and placebo for 21 days, then risedronate 20 mg/day for 7 days, and finally elemental calcium 1000 mg/day and placebo for 21 days; and (iv) P, placebo for 56 days. The biological response was investigated by measuring serum calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH), and 2 h urinary pyridinoline/creatinine (Pyr/Cr) and deoxypyridinoline/creatinine (DPyr/Cr) ratios at baseline and at days 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, and 84. Overall, there were no consistent trends observed between the active group and placebo for serum calcium. In groups R-P, R-CP-P, and R-CP-R-CP, mean serum PTH levels were elevated above baseline values for the entire 56 day treatment period and remained elevated, although to a lesser extent, at the day 84 follow-up visit. The effect of calcium supplementation on PTH was variable. Urinary Pyr/Cr and DPyr/Cr ratios were decreased from baseline over the entire study period in all groups receiving risedronate. The maximum observed percent decreases from baseline for Pyr/Cr and DPyr/Cr were -46.9% and -58.8%, respectively, at day 49 in the R-CP-R-CP group. In conclusion, risedronate given orally at a dose of 20 mg/day, continuously for 7 or 14 days, resulted in the expected biological response in osteoporotic women. The time course of changes in PTH levels following cessation of dosing was unaffected by calcium supplementation. There was no evidence of a PTH-mediated rebound in bone resorption following cessation of therapy. Furthermore, based on collagen cross-link data, patients did not show an excessive reduction in bone turnover. [less ▲]

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See detailLong-term effects of glucosamine sulphate on osteoarthritis progression: a randomised, placebo-controlled clinical trial
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Deroisy, Rita ULg; Rovati, Lucio C et al

in Lancet (2001), 357

BACKGROUND: Treatment of osteoarthritis is usually limited to short-term symptom control. We assessed the effects of the specific drug glucosamine sulphate on the long-term progression of osteoarthritis ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Treatment of osteoarthritis is usually limited to short-term symptom control. We assessed the effects of the specific drug glucosamine sulphate on the long-term progression of osteoarthritis joint structure changes and symptoms. METHODS: We did a randomised, double-blind placebo controlled trial, in which 212 patients with knee osteoarthritis were randomly assigned 1500 mg sulphate oral glucosamine or placebo once daily for 3 years. Weightbearing, anteroposterior radiographs of each knee in full extension were taken at enrolment and after 1 and 3 years. Mean joint-space width of the medial compartment of the tibiofemoral joint was assessed by digital image analysis, whereas minimum joint-space width--ie, at the narrowest point--was measured by visual inspection with a magnifying lens. Symptoms were scored by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) osteoarthritis index. FINDINGS: The 106 patients on placebo had a progressive joint-space narrowing, with a mean joint-space loss after 3 years of -0.31 mm (95% CI -0.48 to -0.13). There was no significant joint-space loss in the 106 patients on glucosamine sulphate: -0.06 mm (-0.22 to 0.09). Similar results were reported with minimum joint-space narrowing. As assessed by WOMAC scores, symptoms worsened slightly in patients on placebo compared with the improvement observed after treatment with glucosamine sulphate. There were no differences in safety or reasons for early withdrawal between the treatment and placebo groups. INTERPRETATION: The long-term combined structure-modifying and symptom-modifying effects of gluosamine sulphate suggest that it could be a disease modifying agent in osteoarthritis. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of risedronate on the risk of hip fracture in elderly women. Hip Intervention Program Study Group.
McClung, M R; Geusens, P; Miller, P D et al

in New England Journal of Medicine [=NEJM] (2001), 344(5), 333-40

BACKGROUND: Risedronate increases bone mineral density in elderly women, but whether it prevents hip fracture is not known. METHODS: We studied 5445 women 70 to 79 years old who had osteoporosis ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Risedronate increases bone mineral density in elderly women, but whether it prevents hip fracture is not known. METHODS: We studied 5445 women 70 to 79 years old who had osteoporosis (indicated by a T score for bone mineral density at the femoral neck that was more than 4 SD below the mean peak value in young adults [-4] or lower than -3 plus a nonskeletal risk factor for hip fracture, such as poor gait or a propensity to fall) and 3886 women at least 80 years old who had at least one nonskeletal risk factor for hip fracture or low bone mineral density at the femoral neck (T score, lower than -4 or lower than -3 plus a hip-axis length of 11.1 cm or greater). The women were randomly assigned to receive treatment with oral risedronate (2.5 or 5.0 mg daily) or placebo for three years. The primary end point was the occurrence of hip fracture. RESULTS: Overall, the incidence of hip fracture among all the women assigned to risedronate was 2.8 percent, as compared with 3.9 percent among those assigned to placebo (relative risk, 0.7; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.6 to 0.9; P=0.02). In the group of women with osteoporosis (those 70 to 79 years old), the incidence of hip fracture among those assigned to risedronate was 1.9 percent, as compared with 3.2 percent among those assigned to placebo (relative risk, 0.6; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.4 to 0.9; P=0.009). In the group of women selected primarily on the basis of nonskeletal risk factors (those at least 80 years of age), the incidence of hip fracture was 4.2 percent among those assigned to risedronate and 5.1 percent among those assigned to placebo (P=0.35). CONCLUSIONS: Risedronate significantly reduces the risk of hip fracture among elderly women with confirmed osteoporosis but not among elderly women selected primarily on the basis of risk factors other than low bone mineral density. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of nutraceuticals on cartilage health and integrity
Henrotin, Yves ULg; Mathy-Hartet, M; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Proceeding of the Large Breed Health Care Symposium (2001)

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See detailEvaluation of classical NSAIDS and COX-2 selective inhibitors on purified ovine enzymes and human whole blood
De Leval, X; Dogne, JM; Delange, J et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2001), 60(S1), 343

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See detailOn Conducting Burden-of-Osteoporosis Studies: A Review of the Core Concepts and Practical Issues. A Study Carried out under the Auspices of a Who Collaborating Center
Ben Sedrine, Wafa ULg; Radican, L.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Rheumatology (2001), 40(1), 7-14

Osteoporosis is a problem that is relevant to public health from the clinical, economic and social viewpoints. Except in a handful of industrialized countries, there is a considerable void in our ... [more ▼]

Osteoporosis is a problem that is relevant to public health from the clinical, economic and social viewpoints. Except in a handful of industrialized countries, there is a considerable void in our knowledge of the magnitude of the problem. By exploring both the epidemiological and the economic impact of osteoporosis and the fractures associated with it in a particular country, studies of the 'burden of illness' (BOI) can fill that void. BOI analysis raises many questions at both the conceptual and the practical level. The purpose of this paper is to review the methodology underlying analyses of this type, to discuss its limitations and to provide a general format to improve their implementation in the field of osteoporosis. Investigators involved in BOI analysis should be very clear and explicit regarding the methods they adopt, so that studies in different countries can be interpreted and compared appropriately by interested parties. [less ▲]

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See detailIncidence des perturbations psychoendocriniennes au centre interdisciplinaire de l’andropause (CIA) du CHU de Liège : bilan des 7 premiers mois d’activité
Allouch, A; Bruwier, M; Comte-Tassin, M et al

in Annales d'Endocrinologie (2001), 62(4), 178

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See detailA simple clinical tool to identify Asian women with osteoporosis
Lou, SQ; Koh, L; Yang, BY et al

in Journal of Rheumatology (2001), 28(S63), 26

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See detailThe effect of risedronate on hip fracture risk in elderly women with osteoporosis
Bensen, W; Eastell, R; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg et al

in Journal of Rheumatology (2001), 28(S63), 24

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See detailStand der osteoporose-Therapie. Ein Medizinischer Skandal
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in MMW Fortschritte der Medizin (2001), 143(14), 43

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See detailRisedronate Increases Bone Mineral Density and Reduces the Vertebral Fracture Incidence in Postmenopausal Women
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology (2001), 19(1), 121-2

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See detailThe expression of IL-1β, iNOS and COX-2 genes by human chondrocytes is differentially regulated by reactive oxygen species
Henrotin, Yves ULg; Mathy, M; Deby, G et al

in Tissue Engineering (2001), 7

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See detailThe expression of IL-1 β, iNOS and COX-2 genes by human chondrocytes is differentially regulated by reactive oxygen species
Mathy-Hartert, M; Deby, GP; Ayache, N et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2001), 9SB

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