References of "Reginster, Jean-Yves"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailValue of biomarkers in osteoarthritis: current status and perspectives.
Lotz, M.; Martel-Pelletier, J.; Christiansen, C. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2013), 72

Osteoarthritis affects the whole joint structure with progressive changes in cartilage, menisci, ligaments and subchondral bone, and synovial inflammation. Biomarkers are being developed to quantify joint ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis affects the whole joint structure with progressive changes in cartilage, menisci, ligaments and subchondral bone, and synovial inflammation. Biomarkers are being developed to quantify joint remodelling and disease progression. This article was prepared following a working meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis convened to discuss the value of biochemical markers of matrix metabolism in drug development in osteoarthritis. The best candidates are generally molecules or molecular fragments present in cartilage, bone or synovium and may be specific to one type of joint tissue or common to them all. Many currently investigated biomarkers are associated with collagen metabolism in cartilage or bone, or aggrecan metabolism in cartilage. Other biomarkers are related to non-collagenous proteins, inflammation and/or fibrosis. Biomarkers in osteoarthritis can be categorised using the burden of disease, investigative, prognostic, efficacy of intervention, diagnostic and safety classification. There are a number of promising candidates, notably urinary C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type II and serum cartilage oligomeric protein, although none is sufficiently discriminating to differentiate between individual patients and controls (diagnostic) or between patients with different disease severities (burden of disease), predict prognosis in individuals with or without osteoarthritis (prognostic) or perform so consistently that it could function as a surrogate outcome in clinical trials (efficacy of intervention). Future avenues for research include exploration of underlying mechanisms of disease and development of new biomarkers; technological development; the 'omics' (genomics, metabolomics, proteomics and lipidomics); design of aggregate scores combining a panel of biomarkers and/or imaging markers into single diagnostic algorithms; and investigation into the relationship between biomarkers and prognosis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Effect of 3 or 6 Years of Denosumab Exposure in Women With Postmenopausal Osteoporosis: Results From the FREEDOM Extension.
Bone, Henry G.; Chapurlat, Roland; Brandi, Maria-Luisa et al

in The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism (2013)

Context:The FREEDOM extension is evaluating the long-term efficacy and safety of denosumab for up to 10 years.Objective:Report results from the first 3 years of the extension, representing up to 6 years ... [more ▼]

Context:The FREEDOM extension is evaluating the long-term efficacy and safety of denosumab for up to 10 years.Objective:Report results from the first 3 years of the extension, representing up to 6 years of denosumab exposure.Design, Setting, and Participants: Multicenter, international, open-label study of 4550 women.Intervention:Women from the FREEDOM denosumab group received 3 more years of denosumab for a total of 6 years (long-term) and women from the FREEDOM placebo group received 3 years of denosumab (cross-over).Main Outcome Measures:Bone turnover markers (BTMs), bone mineral density (BMD), fracture, and safety.Results:Reductions in BTMs were maintained (long-term) or achieved rapidly (cross-over) following denosumab administration. In the long-term group, BMD further increased for cumulative 6-year gains of 15.2% (lumbar spine) and 7.5% (total hip). During the first 3 years of denosumab treatment, the cross-over group had significant gains in lumbar spine (9.4%) and total hip (4.8%) BMD, similar to the long-term group during the 3-year FREEDOM trial. In the long-term group, fracture incidences remained low and below rates projected for a "virtual placebo" cohort. In the cross-over group, 3-year incidences of new vertebral and nonvertebral fractures were similar to those of the FREEDOM denosumab group. Incidence rates of adverse events did not increase over time. Six participants had events of ONJ confirmed by adjudication. One participant had a fracture adjudicated as consistent with atypical femoral fracture.Conclusion:Denosumab treatment for 6 years remained well tolerated, maintained reduced bone turnover, and continued to increase BMD. Fracture incidence remained low. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailErratum to: Vitamin D Status and Bone Mineral Density Changes During Alendronate Treatment in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.
Roux, Christian; Binkley, Neil; Boonen, Steven et al

in Calcified tissue international (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCost-effectiveness of denosumab in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporotic women.
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Boonen, Annelies; Dirksen, Carmen D. et al

in Expert review of pharmacoeconomics & outcomes research (2013), 13(1), 19-28

Denosumab is a novel biological agent for the treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women with increased risk of fractures. With limited healthcare resources, economic evaluations are increasingly ... [more ▼]

Denosumab is a novel biological agent for the treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women with increased risk of fractures. With limited healthcare resources, economic evaluations are increasingly being used by decision-makers to optimize healthcare resource allocation. The cost-effectiveness of denosumab has been evaluated in various studies, and a systematic literature study was conducted up to April 2012 to identify all published research articles and research abstracts presented at various congresses. This article provides a systematic review of four articles and eight abstracts reporting on the cost-effectiveness of denosumab in the treatment of osteoporosis. In most economic evaluations, denosumab has been considered as a cost-effective treatment compared with first-line and second-line options (including generic alendronate) in the treatment of women with high risk of fractures. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailErratum to : Recommendations for the health economics analysis to be performed with a drug to be registered in prevention or treatment of osteoporosis
Dere, W; Avouac, B; Boers, M et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2013), 93

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat do we know about the safety of corticosteroids in rheumatoid arthritis?
Ethgen, Olivier ULg; De Lemos Esteves, Frédéric ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Current Medical Research & Opinion (2013), 29(9), 1147-60

Abstract Background: Clear information is still lacking on the safety of corticosteroids (GCs) therapy in RA despite six decades of clinical experience. Scope: We performed a literature search in Ovid ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background: Clear information is still lacking on the safety of corticosteroids (GCs) therapy in RA despite six decades of clinical experience. Scope: We performed a literature search in Ovid MEDLINE from January 2000 to December 2012. Our Population Intervention Comparator Outcomes (PICO) strategy search was: rheumatoid arthritis [Population], corticosteroids or glucocorticoids [Intervention], any comparison [Comparator], adverse effects [Outcome]. Studies were selected if they reported any measure of association between GCs intake and potential adverse effects in RA patients. Findings: We identified 1030 papers and selected for analysis 26 observational studies and six systematic reviews. The major side effects of GCs in RA are bone loss, risk of cardiovascular events and risk of infections as evidenced by large observational studies and not necessarily RCTs. Others associations were reported with herpes zoster, tuberculosis, hyperglycemia, cutaneous abnormalities, gastrointestinal perforation, respiratory infection and self-reported health problems such as cushingoid phenotype, ecchymosis, parchment-like skin, epistaxis, weight gain and sleep disturbance. Other potential adverse effects of GCs were studied but no association was found. These included psychological disorders, dermatophytosis, brain diseases, interstitial lung disease, memory deficit, metabolic syndrome, lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, renal function and cerebrovascular accidents. Most of the evidence emanates from observational researches and the inherent limitations of such data should be kept in mind. Conclusion: Recent observational data and systematic reviews suggest that GCs can lead to relatively alarming and burdensome side effects in RA. This is particularly true for patients who have longer term and higher dose therapies. GCs are largely used in RA and knowing their safety profile is essential to improve patients care. The design of new therapeutic strategies intended to minimize the daily dosing of GCs while conserving their beneficial effect should be encouraged. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (17 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTools in the assessment of sarcopenia.
Cooper, C.; Fielding, R.; Visser, M. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2013), 93(3), 201-10

This review provides a framework for the development of an operational definition of sarcopenia and of the potential end points that might be adopted in clinical trials among older adults. While the ... [more ▼]

This review provides a framework for the development of an operational definition of sarcopenia and of the potential end points that might be adopted in clinical trials among older adults. While the clinical relevance of sarcopenia is widely recognized, there is currently no universally accepted definition of the disorder. The development of interventions to alter the natural history of sarcopenia also requires consensus on the most appropriate end points for determining outcomes of clinical importance which might be utilized in intervention studies. We review current approaches to the definition of sarcopenia and the methods used for the assessment of various aspects of physical function in older people. The potential end points of muscle mass, muscle strength, muscle power, and muscle fatigue, as well as the relationships between them, are explored with reference to the availability and practicality of the available methods for measuring these end points in clinical trials. Based on current evidence, none of the four potential outcomes in question is sufficiently comprehensive to recommend as a uniform single outcome in randomized clinical trials. We propose that sarcopenia may be optimally defined (for the purposes of clinical trial inclusion criteria as well as epidemiological studies) using a combination of measures of muscle mass and physical performance. The choice of outcome measures for clinical trials in sarcopenia is more difficult; co-primary outcomes, tailored to the specific intervention in question, may be the best way forward in this difficult but clinically important area. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCost-effectiveness of bazedoxifene compared with raloxifene in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporotic women.
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Ben Sedrine, Wafa ULg; REGINSTER, Jean-Yves ULg

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2013), 28(4), 807-15

Bazedoxifene is a novel selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. In addition to the therapeutic value of a new agent, evaluation of the cost ... [more ▼]

Bazedoxifene is a novel selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. In addition to the therapeutic value of a new agent, evaluation of the cost-effectiveness compared with relevant alternative treatment(s) is an important consideration to facilitate healthcare decision making. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of bazedoxifene compared with raloxifene for the treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. The cost-effectiveness of treatment for 3 years with bazedoxifene was compared with raloxifene using an updated version of a previously validated Markov microsimulation model. Analyses were conducted from a Belgian healthcare payer perspective and, the base-case population was women (aged 70 years) with bone mineral density T-score </= -2.5. The effects of bazedoxifene and raloxifene on fracture risk were derived from the 3-year results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled and active-controlled study, including postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. The cost-effectiveness analysis based on efficacy data from the overall clinical trial indicated that bazedoxifene and raloxifene were equally cost-effective. When the results were examined based on the subgroup analysis of women at higher risk of fractures, bazedoxifene was dominant (lower cost for higher effectiveness) compared with raloxifene in most of the simulations. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of the results, which were largely independent of starting age of treatment, fracture risk, cost, and disutility. In addition, when the cost of raloxifene was reduced by one-half or when incorporating the raloxifene effects on reducing breast cancer, bazedoxifene remained cost-effective, at a threshold of euro35,000 per quality-adjusted life-years gained, in 85% and 68% of the simulations, respectively. Under the assumption of improved antifracture efficacy of bazedoxifene over raloxifene in women with high risk of fractures, this study suggests that bazedoxifene can be considered cost-effective, and even dominant, when compared with raloxifene in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporotic women. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNutrition and bone health : turning beliefs into knowledge for healthy behaviour
Brandi, ML; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 388-389

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInhibition of sclerostin with romosozumab in postmenopausal women with low BMD : phase 2 trial results
McClung, M; Grauer, A; Boonen, S et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 38-39

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPatients' preferences for osteoporosis drug therapy : a discrete choice experiment
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Dellaert, B; Dirksen, C et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 53

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPharmacological management : osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, similarities and differences
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 75-76

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe general approach to the patient with osteoarthritis : is a treatment algorithm feasible ?
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 385

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStrontium ranelate effect on knee osteoarthritis progression : a MRI analysis
Genant, HK; Zaim, S; Guermazi, A et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 312-313

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStrontium ranelate prevents radiological progression in patients with primary knee osteoarthritis
Cooper, C; Berembaum, F; Nash, P et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 306-307

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIndirect comparison of bazedoxifene vs. oral bisphosphonates for the prevention of vertebral fractures in postmenopausal osteoporotic women
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Ellis, AG; Luo, X et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 37

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailACP Journal Club: supplementation with vitamin D did not reduce cartilage volume loss or pain in knee osteoarthritis.
REGINSTER, Jean-Yves ULg; Pelousse, Franz

in Annals of Internal Medicine (2013), 158(8), 9

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (5 ULg)