References of "Radioti, Aikaterini"
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See detailBursty magnetic reconnection at Saturn's magnetosphere
Badman, S. V.; Masters, A.; Hasegawa, H. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2013)

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See detailAuroral signatures of multiple magnetopause reconnection at Saturn
Radioti, Aikaterini ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2013)

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See detailUnraveling electron acceleration mechanisms in Ganymede's space environment through N-S conjugate imagery of Jupiter's aurora
Grodent, Denis ULg; Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

E-print/Working paper (2013)

There is strong scientific interest in Ganymede (Jupiter's third Galilean moon) and its surrounding environment, which stems from the likely presence of a liquid water ocean underneath its icy crust and ... [more ▼]

There is strong scientific interest in Ganymede (Jupiter's third Galilean moon) and its surrounding environment, which stems from the likely presence of a liquid water ocean underneath its icy crust and from its internally driven magnetic field. The interaction of the latter with Jupiter's magnetospheric plasma and its magnetic field gives rise to a unique situation in our solar system implying a mini-magnetosphere embedded within a giant-magnetosphere. This interaction generates Ganymede's ultraviolet auroral footprint in Jupiter's atmosphere. We propose to investigate the strong auroral connection between Jupiter and Ganymede and the variable characteristics of Ganymede's magnetosphere with an innovative approach, taking advantage of the large scale north-south asymmetries of Jupiter's magnetic field. The results obtained for Ganymede will be compared with the case of small injected hot plasma bubbles observed by the Galileo spacecraft and whose size and location are similar to those of Ganymede's magnetosphere. HST is currently the sole instrument capable of obtaining this information which pins down the proposed mechanisms linking the source and sink regions of auroral particles in the giant planets' magnetospheres. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative magnetotail flapping: An overview of selectec events ad Earth, Jupiter and Saturn
Volwerk, M.; Andre, N.; Arridge, C. et al

in Annales Geophysicae [= ANGEO] (2013)

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See detailEffects of methane on giant planet’s UV emissions and implications for the auroral characteristics
Gustin, Jacques ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

in Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy (2013)

This study reviews methods used to determine important characteristics of giant planet’s UV aurora (brightness,energy of the precipitating particles, altitude of the emission peak,. . .), based on the ... [more ▼]

This study reviews methods used to determine important characteristics of giant planet’s UV aurora (brightness,energy of the precipitating particles, altitude of the emission peak,. . .), based on the absorbing properties of methane and other hydrocarbons. Ultraviolet aurorae on giant planets are mostly caused by inelastic collisions between energetic magnetospheric electrons and the ambient atmospheric H2 molecules. The auroral emission is situated close to a hydrocarbon layer and may be attenuated by methane (CH4), ethane (C2H6) and acetylene (C2H2) at selected wavelengths. As methane is the most abundant hydrocarbon, it is the main UV absorber and attenuates the auroral emission shorward of 1350 Å. The level of absorption is used to situate the altitude/pressure level of the aurora, hence the energy of the precipitated electrons, whose penetration depth is directly related to their mean energy. Several techniques are used to determine these characteristics, from the color ratio method which measures the level of absorption from the ratio between an absorbed and an unabsorbed portion of the observed auroral spectrum, to more realistic methods which combine theoretical distributions of the precipitating electrons with altitude dependent atmospheric models. The latter models are coupled with synthetic or laboratory H2 spectra and the simulated emergent spectra are compared to observations to determine the best auroral characteristics. Although auroral characteristics may be very variable with time and locations, several typical properties may be highlighted from these methods: the Jovian aurora is the most powerful, with brightness around 120 kR produced by electrons of mean energy 100 keV and an emission situated near the 1 lbar level ( 250 km above the 1 bar level) while Saturn’s aurora is fainter ( 10 kR), produced by electrons less than 20 keV and situated near the 0.2 lbar level ( 1100 km). [less ▲]

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See detailSignatures of magnetospheric injections in Saturn's aurora
Radioti, Aikaterini ULg; Roussos, E.; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2013)

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See detailOn the origin of Saturn's polar auroral arcs
Radioti, Aikaterini ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

Conference (2012, September 27)

Saturn’s main auroral emission similarly to Earth’s is suggested to be associated with the open-closed field line boundary. The polar auroral emissions at Saturn, emissions located poleward of the main ... [more ▼]

Saturn’s main auroral emission similarly to Earth’s is suggested to be associated with the open-closed field line boundary. The polar auroral emissions at Saturn, emissions located poleward of the main emission consist of several arc-like and spotty features. In this study we focus on the arc-like structures observed with the UVIS instrument onboard Cassini and we characterize them into three groups: ‘bending arcs’ arcs whose one end is connected to the main emision, ‘oval aligned arcs’ arcs oriented parallel to the main emission and ‘moving arcs’ arcs which move with time inside the main emission. We study their occurrence rate, location, size as well as their associated expansion or contraction of the main emission. Finally, we compare the auroral arcs at Saturn with those in the terrestrial aurora and we examine their relation to a combination of solar wind parameters such as northward IMF, strong IMF magnitude and high solar wind speed. [less ▲]

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See detailAuroral counterpart of magnet ic dipolarizations in Saturn’s tail
Jackman, Caitriona; Achilleos, Nicholas; Cowley, Stan et al

Poster (2012, September 27)

Following magnetic reconnection in a planetary magnetotail, newly closed field lines can be rapidly accelerated back towards the planet, becoming “dipolarized” in the process. At Saturn, dipolarizations ... [more ▼]

Following magnetic reconnection in a planetary magnetotail, newly closed field lines can be rapidly accelerated back towards the planet, becoming “dipolarized” in the process. At Saturn, dipolarizations are initially identified in magnetometer data by looking for a southward turning of the magnetic field, indicating the transition from a radially stretched configuration to a more dipolar field topology. The highly stretched geometry of the kronian magnetotail lobes gives rise to a tail current which flows eastward (dusk to dawn) in the near equatorial plane across the centre of the tail. During reconnection and associated dipolarization of the field, the inner edge of this tail current can be diverted through the ionosphere, in a situation analogous to the substorm current wedge picture at Earth. We present a picture of the current circuit arising from this tail reconfiguration, and outline the equations which govern the field- current relationship. We show the first in situ example of a dipolarization identified in the Cassini magnetometer data and use this formalism to estimate the ionospheric current density that would arise for this example and the implications for auroral electron acceleration in regions of upward directed field-aligned current. We then present a separate example of data from the Cassini UVIS instrument where we observe small ‘spots’ of auroral emission lying near the main oval; features suggested to be associated with dipolarizations in the tail. In the example shown, such auroral features are the precursor to more intense activity associated with recurrent energisation via particle injections from the tail following reconnection. [less ▲]

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See detailObservations of equatorward patchy auroral ultraviolet emissions
Dumont, Maïté ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Radioti, Aikaterini ULg et al

Conference (2012, May 25)

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See detailSaturn's temperature profiles at high, medium and low latitudes derived from UVIS occultations
Gustin, Jacques ULg; Moses, Julie; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

Conference (2012, May 24)

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See detailEquatorward auroral features: auroral signatures of injections
Radioti, Aikaterini ULg; Roussos, Elias; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

Scientific conference (2012, May)

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See detailExpansion of the main auroral oval at Jupiter : evidence for Io’s control over the Jovian magnetosphere
Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

Poster (2012, April)

In spring 2007, New Horizons' Jupiter fly-by provided a unique opportunity for the largest observation campaign dedicated to the Jovian aurora ever carried out by the Hubble Space Telescope. UV images of ... [more ▼]

In spring 2007, New Horizons' Jupiter fly-by provided a unique opportunity for the largest observation campaign dedicated to the Jovian aurora ever carried out by the Hubble Space Telescope. UV images of the aurora have been acquired on a quasi-daily basis from mid-February to mid-June 2007. Polar projection of the auroral emissions clearly show a continuous long-term expansion of main oval additionally to day by day variations. The main oval moved so much that the Ganymede footprint, which is usually located equatorward of the main emissions, has even been observed inside of it. Simultaneously, the occurrence rate of large equatorward isolated auroral features increased over the season. These emission patches are generally attributed to injections of depleted flux tubes. On 6th June, one of these features exceptionally moved down to the Io footpath. The Io footprint seemed to disappear while the footprint moved through this patch of emission. This disappearance is a unique case among all the UV images of the aurora acquired during the last 12 years. We suggest that all these changes seen in the Jovian aurora are evidence for a major reconfiguration of the magnetosphere induced by increased volcanic activity on Io. Indeed, New Horizons observed particularly intense activity from the Tvashtar volcano in late February 2007. Moreover, sodium cloud brightening caused by volcanic outbursts have also been seen in late May 2007. According to our interpretation, repeated volcanic outbursts beefed up the plasma torus density and its mass outflow rate. This caused the corotation breakdown boundary to migrate closer to Jupiter. Consequently, the main auroral oval moved equatorward. As heavy flux tubes move outward, sparsely filled ones should be injected into the inner magnetosphere in order to conserve the magnetic flux in this region. This phenomenon could explain the large number of injection signatures observed in May-June 2007. Such a cloud of depleted flux tubes probably disrupted the Io-magnetosphere interaction, leading to an abnormally faint Io footprint. [less ▲]

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