References of "REGINSTER, Jean-Yves"
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See detailFemoro-tibial joint space width, assessed by standard X-Ray, is associated with tibial cartilage volume and thickness, assessed by magnetic resonance imaging
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Kothari, M.; Zaim, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 46

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See detailAn indirect comparison of the efficacies of vitamin D and its hydroxylated analogs in postmenopausal and corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis
Richy, Florent; Schacht, E.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 29

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See detailKnee whole-organ MRI score (WORMS) as a surrogate marker for X-ray joint space narrowing
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Kothari, M.; Zaim, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 6

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See detailNew serum biochemical markers (Coll 2-1 and Coll 2-1 NO2) for studying oxidative-related type II collagen network degradation in patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis
Deberg, Michelle ULg; Labasse, Alain ULg; Christgau, S. et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2005), 13(3), 258-265

Objective: Protein nitration is a prominent feature of inflammatory processes in the joint. We have developed immunoassays specific for a peptide of the alpha-helical region of type II collagen (108 ... [more ▼]

Objective: Protein nitration is a prominent feature of inflammatory processes in the joint. We have developed immunoassays specific for a peptide of the alpha-helical region of type II collagen (108)HRGYPGLDG(116) (Coll 2-1) and its nitrated form (108)HRGY(NO2)PGLDG(116) (Coll 2-1 NO2) in biological fluids. Design: Coll 2-1 and Coll 2-1 NO2 peptides were injected into rabbits. Two antisera (D3 and D37) were selected for their specificity and affinity and used to develop specific immunoassays. Coll 2-1 and Coll 2-1 NO2 were measured in sera of 242 healthy subjects (N), 67 patients with primary knee osteoarthritis (OA) and 19 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Results: In healthy subjects, Coll 2-1 and Coll 2-1 NO2 concentrations were 125.13 +/- 3.71 nM and 0.16 +/- 0.08 nM, respectively. In OA and RA, Coll 2-1 and Coll 2-1 NO2 serum levels were found to be significantly increased compared to controls of the same range of age (Coll 2-1: OA: 200.80 +/- 8.98 nM, RA: 172.30 +/- 19.05 nM, normal: 126.60 +/- 6.70 nM and Coll 2-1 NO2: OA: 0.26 +/- 0.02, RA: 0.38 +/- 0.05, normal: 0.12 +/- 0.01 nM). Coll 2-1 NO2 levels were significantly more elevated in RA than in OA patients (P < 0.05). As a consequence, the ratio Coll 2-1 NO2/Coll 2-1 was 1.6 times higher in RA than in OA subjects. No relationship was found between the radiological OA severity and the levels of Coll 2-1 and Coll 2-1 NO2 in serum. Coll 2-1 NO2, but not Coll 2-1, was correlated with C-reactive protein in the sera of OA and RA patients. Conclusions: The determination of both Coll 2-1 and Coll 2-1 NO2 in serum of arthritic patients seems to be a promising useful tool for the detection of oxidative-related cartilage degradation episode. Further, these markers could be helpful for monitoring the effects of anti-inflammatory or antioxidant drugs on cartilage degradation. (c) 2004 OsteoArthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence-based guidelines for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis: a consensus document of the Belgian Bone Club
Boonen, S.; Body, Jean-Jacques; Boutsen, Y. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005), 16(3), 239-254

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See detailVitamin D analogs versus native vitamin D in preventing bone loss and osteoporosis-related fractures: A comparative meta-analysis
Richy, F.; Schacht, E.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2005), 76(3), 176-186

It has been suggested that early postmenopausal women and patients treated with steroids should receive preventive therapy (calcium, vitamin D, vitamin D analogs, estrogens, or bisphosphonates) to ... [more ▼]

It has been suggested that early postmenopausal women and patients treated with steroids should receive preventive therapy (calcium, vitamin D, vitamin D analogs, estrogens, or bisphosphonates) to preserve their bone mineral density (BMD) and to avoid fragility fractures. We designed the present study to compare the effects of native vitamin D to its hydroxylated analogs alfacalcidol 1-alpha(OH)D and calcitriol 1,25(OH)(2)D. All randomized, controlled, double-blinded trials comparing oral native vitamin D and its analogs, alfacalcidol or calcitriol, to placebo or head-to-head trials in primary or corticosteroids-induced osteoporosis were included in the meta-analysis. Sources included the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and a hand search of abstracts and references lists. The study period January 1985 to January 2003. Data were abstracted by two investigators, and methodological quality was assessed in a similar manner. Heterogeneity was extensively investigated. Results were expressed as effect-size (ES) for bone loss and as rate difference (RD) for fracture while allocated to active treatment or control. Publication bias was investigated. Fourteen studies of native vitamin D, nine of alfacalcidol, and ten of calcitriol fit the inclusion criteria. The two vitamin D analogs appeared to exert a higher preventive effect on bone loss and fracture rates in patients not exposed to glucocorticoids. With respect to BMD, vitamin D analogs versus placebo studies had an ES of 0.36 (P < 0.0001), whereas native vitamin D versus placebo had an ES of 0.17 (P = 0.0005), the interclass difference being highly significant (ANOVA-1, P < 0.05). When restricted to the lumbar spine, this intertreatment difference remained significant: ES = 0.43 (P = 0.0002) for vitamin D analogs and ES = 0.21 (P = 0.001) for native vitamin D (analysis of variance [ANOVA-1], P = 0.047). There were no significant differences regarding their efficacies on other measurement sites (ANOVA-1, P = 0.36). When comparing the adjusted global relative risks for fracture when allocated to vitamin D analogs or native vitamin D, alfacalcidol and calcitriol provided a more marked preventive efficacy against fractures: RD = 10% (95% Confidence interval [CI-2] to 17) compared to RD = 2% (95% CI, 1 to 2), respectively. The analysis of the spinal and nonspinal showed that fracture rates differed between the two classes, thereby confirming the benefits of vitamin D analogs, with significant 13.4% (95% CI 7.7 to 19.8) and. 6% (95% CI 1 to 12) lower fracture rates for vitamin D analogs, respectively. In patients receiving corticosteroid therapy, both treatments provided similar global ESs for BMD: ES = 0.38 for vitamin D analogs and ES = 0.41 for native vitamin D (ANOVA-1, P = 0.88). When restriced to spinal BMD, D analogs provided significant effects, whereas native vitamin D did not: ES = 0.43 (P < 0.0001) and ES = 0.33 (P = 0.21), respectively. The intertreatment difference was nonsignificant (ANOVA-1, P = 0.52). Neither D analogs for native vitamin D significantly prevented fractures in this subcategory of patients: RD = 2.6 (95%CI, -9.5 to 4.3) and RD = 6.4 (95%CI, -2.3 to 10), respectively. In head-to-head studies comparing D analogs and native vitamin D in patients receiving corticosteroids, significant effects favoring D analogs were found for femoral neck BMD: ES = 0.31 at P = 0.02 and spinal fractures: RD = 15% (95%CI, 6.5 to 25). Publication bias was not significant. Our analysis demonstrates a superiority of the D analogs atfacalcidol and calcitriol in preventing bone loss and spinal fractures in primary osteoporosis, including postmenopausal women. In corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis, the efficacy of D analogs differed depending on the comparative approach: indirect comparisons led to nonsignificant differences, whereas direct comparison did provide significant differences. In this setting, D analogs seem to prevent spinal fractures to a greater extent than do native vitamin D, but this assumption should be confirmed on a comprehensive basis in multiarm studies including an inactive comparator. [less ▲]

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See detailControlled whole body vibration to decrease fall risk and improve health-related quality of life of nursing home residents
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Wuidart, M. A.; Di Palma, E. et al

in Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (2005), 86(2), 303-307

Objective: To investigate the effects of whole body vibration in the elderly. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Nursing home. Participants: Forty-two elderly volunteers. Interventions: Six ... [more ▼]

Objective: To investigate the effects of whole body vibration in the elderly. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Nursing home. Participants: Forty-two elderly volunteers. Interventions: Six-week vibration intervention plus physical therapy (PT) (n=22) or PT alone (n=20). Main Outcome Measures: We assessed gait and body balance using the Tinetti test (maximum scores of 12 for gait, 16 for body balance, 28 for global score), motor capacity using the Timed Up & Go (TUG) test, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results: After 6 weeks, the vibration intervention group improved by a mean +/- standard deviation of 2.4 +/- 2.3 points on the gait score compared with no score change in the control group (P<.001). The intervention group improved by 3.5 +/- 2.1 points on the body balance score compared with a decrease of 03 +/- 1.2 points in the control group (P<.001). TUG test time decreased by 11.0 +/- 8.6 seconds in the treated group compared with an increase of 2.6 +/- 8.8 seconds in the control group (P<.001). The intervention group had significantly greater improvements from baseline on 8 of 9 items on the SF-36 compared with the control group. Conclusions: Controlled whole body vibration can improve elements of fall risk and HRQOL in elderly patients. [less ▲]

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See detailTotal joint replacement of hip or knee as an outcome measure for structure modifying trials in osteoarthritis
Altman, R. D.; Abadie, Eric ULg; Avouac, B. et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2005), 13(1), 13-19

Objective: The Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science (GREES) organized a working group to assess the value of time to joint surgery as a potential therapeutic failure outcome criterion ... [more ▼]

Objective: The Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science (GREES) organized a working group to assess the value of time to joint surgery as a potential therapeutic failure outcome criterion for osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee in the assessment of potential structure modifying agents. Methods: PubMed was searched for manuscripts from 1976 to 2004. Relevant studies were discussed at a 1-day meeting. Results: There are no accepted guidelines for 'time to' and 'indications for' joint replacement surgery. A limited number of trials have examined joint replacement surgery within the study population. Several parameters, particularly joint space narrowing (interbone distance), correlate with surgical intervention. However, at the level of the knee, none of the parameters have positive predictive value for joint replacement surgery better than 30%. In contrast, lack of significant joint space narrowing has a strong negative predictive value for joint replacement surgery (> 90%), that remains after controlling for OA pain severity. Conclusion: At this time, GREES cannot recommend time to joint surgery as a primary endpoint of failure for structure modifying trials of hip or knee OA-as the parameter has sensitivity but lacks specificity. In contrast, in existing trials, a lack of progression of joint space narrowing has predictive value of > 90% for not having surgery. GREES suggests utilizing joint space narrowing (e.g., > 0.3-0.7 mm) combined with a lack of clinically relevant improvement in symptoms (e.g., greater than or equal to 20-25%) for 'failure' of a secondary outcome in structure modifying trials of the hip and knee. (C) 2004 OsteoArthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailTreatment of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis is worthwhile. The position of the International Osteoporosis Foundation
Delmas, P. D.; Rizzoli, R.; Cooper, C. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005), 16(1), 1-5

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See detailFractures in osteoporosis: the challenge for the new millennium
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Sarlet, Nathalie ULg; Lecart, Marie-Paule ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2005), 16(Suppl. 1), 1-3

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See detailMéthodologie de l'enquête MISSION (Ménopause, risque de cancer du sein, morbidité et prévalence)
Chevalier, T.; Daures, J. P.; Micheletti, M. C. et al

in Journal de Gynécologie, Obstétrique et Biologie de la Reproduction (2005), 34(7-C1), 658-665

Objective. The ambition of this article is to detail and to explain the methodology of the study named MISSION (Menopause: breast cancer risk, morbidity and prevalence). The aims of MISSION are to ... [more ▼]

Objective. The ambition of this article is to detail and to explain the methodology of the study named MISSION (Menopause: breast cancer risk, morbidity and prevalence). The aims of MISSION are to determine the prevalence of breast cancer and global morbidity in France among menopausal women treated or not with hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and followed by a gynecologist. Material and method. 6600 menopausal women [3300 with HRT — ie for estrogen: only estradiol via oral or transdermal administration; for progestogen: natural progesterone or assimiled or one pregnane derived (excluding medroxyprogesterone acetate) or non-pregnane derived — and 3300 without HRT] will be enrolled in France between January 5 2004 and February 28 2005 by 825 gynecologists, members or not of the National Federation of Medical Gynecologists (FNCGM). This study design is a historico-prospective with case randomization. MISSION is conducted by a Theramex-Merck Laboratories initiative in collaboration with a WHO (World Health Organization) Collaborating Center for Public Health Aspects of Rheumatic Diseases and a multidisciplinary expert group. Conclusion. First results of this study will contribute to better knowledge of women health. [less ▲]

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See detailFollowing up on patients with osteoporosis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in BONE (2005), 36(S2), 474-5

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See detailStrontium ranelate reduces the risk of vertebral fractures in osteoporotic postmenopausal women whatever the baseline vertebral fracture status
Fardellone, P.; Roux, C.; Fechtenbaum, J. et al

in BONE (2005), 36(S2), 403

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See detailMonthly oral ibandronate is at least as effective as daily oral ibandronate in increasing hip BMD in postmenopausal osteoporosis : 1-year results from mobile
Cooper, C.; Stepan, J. J.; Lorenc, R. et al

in BONE (2005), 36(S2), 417

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See detailVitamin D inadequacy : global prevalence and skeletal implications
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Richy, F.; Rabenda, Véronique ULg et al

in BONE (2005), 36(S2), 462

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See detailwhat are the effects of treatments to prevent fractures in postmenopausal osteoporosis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Edwards, J.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in BMJ Clinical evidence (2005), 13

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See detailFracture prevention in postmenopausal women
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Edwards, John; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Clinical Evidence (2005), 13

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See detailLe ranélate de strontium est efficace quel que soit le nombre de fractures vertébrales prévalentes
Roux, C.; Fechtenbaum, J.; Kolta, S. et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2005), 72

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