References of "REGINSTER, Jean-Yves"
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See detailLes nouveaux médicaments de l'arthrose
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Henrotin, Yves ULg

in Pharma-Sphère (2004), 85

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See detailTraitement structurel de l'arthrose : le point en 2004
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; LECART, Marie-Paule ULg; SARLET, Nathalie ULg

in Ortho-Rhumato (2004), 2(3), 52-54

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See detailL'ostéodensitométrie
Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Ortho-Rhumato (2004), 2

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See detailValidation of OSIRIS, a prescreening tool for the identification of women with an increased risk of osteoporosis.
REGINSTER, Jean-Yves ULg; Ben Sedrine, Wafa ULg; Viethel, P. et al

in Gynecological Endocrinology : The Official Journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology (2004), 18(1), 3-8

According to the recent recommendations of the European Community and the World Health Organization, identification of risk factors for fracture or low bone mineral density (BMD) should help health ... [more ▼]

According to the recent recommendations of the European Community and the World Health Organization, identification of risk factors for fracture or low bone mineral density (BMD) should help health professionals to make a better use of bone densitometry. This includes helping patients to modify their behaviour and act on modifiable risk factors (correction of low calcium intake and vitamin D deficiencies, etc.) and also to provide evidence-based guidance for starting a treatment when necessary. In this context, we previously developed a clinical scoring index, OSIRIS (OSteoporosis Index of RISk), for classifying women into three categories of risk of osteoporosis. In order to evaluate the discriminatory performance of OSIRIS, we performed the present prospective study in a sample of 889 postmenopausal women from France. The osteoporosis risk depends on the OSIRIS category. Thus, 62% of women in the 'high-risk' category (OSIRIS < or = -3) were osteoporotic, compared to 34% of women in the 'intermediate-risk' category (OSIRIS ranged between -3 and +1) and only 16.8% of women in the 'low-risk' category (score OSIRIS > 1). These results might contribute to the development of more efficient screening strategies for osteoporosis. The patients in the low-risk category do not require immediate BMD testing; women with 'intermediate risk' have to be carefully followed by their doctor with BMD testing decided on a case-by-case basis; for those within the high-risk category, treatment may be initiated immediately and BMD testing performed either to assess the efficacy of the treatment or to increase the long-term compliance of the patient. In conclusion, for clinical practice, a user-friendly tool has been developed. This tool, called OSIRIS, as far as a simple rule allows, identifies the level of osteoporosis risk in women. [less ▲]

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See detailOsteoporosis prevalence in men varies by the normative reference
Richy, F.; Gourlay, M. L.; Garrett, J. et al

in Journal of Clinical Densitometry (2004), 7

Controversy surrounds which normative data should be used to estimate osteoporosis prevalence in men. Prevalence estimates may vary significantly when different normative standards are applied. Five ... [more ▼]

Controversy surrounds which normative data should be used to estimate osteoporosis prevalence in men. Prevalence estimates may vary significantly when different normative standards are applied. Five normative datasets (NHANES female norms, local female norms, Hologic densitometer manufacturer female norms, NHANES male norms, Hologic male norms) were used to estimate the prevalence of osteoporosis by World Health Organization diagnostic criteria in a study population of 311 consecutive men between the age of 30 and 91 (mean 60.3 yr) referred to an outpatient osteoporosis center between January 1996 and December 1998. Statistically significant variations were seen in osteoporosis prevalence measured at three anatomical sites. The greatest relative variation was seen for the total femur, where osteoporosis prevalence ranged from 7.0% (NHANES and Hologic female norms) to 15.6% (NHANES male norms). The least relative variation was seen at the lumbar spine, where prevalence ranged from 18.1% (Hologic female norms) to 29.6% (local female norms). When considering osteoporosis at any site, prevalence was lowest (23.5%) based on Hologic female norms and highest (35.8%) based on local female norms. Interpretation of prevalence data should include an assessment of how normative standards influence reporting of the population at high risk of fracture. [less ▲]

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See detailTreatment of osteoporosis with biphosphonates - Do compliance and persistence matter ?
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; LECART, Marie-Paule ULg

in Business briefing : Long-term Healthcare (2004), 5

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See detailFrom sample size to effect-size : small study effect investigation (SSEi)
Richy, F.; Ethgen, Olivier ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Internet Journal of Epidemiology (2004), 1(2),

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See detailResponders to glucosamine sulfate in knee osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Pavelka, K.; Richy, F. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2004), 12(SB), 76

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See detailOnce-monthly oral ibandronate a new bisphosphonate dosing concept
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Miller, P.; Delmas, P. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2004), 74(S1), 85

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See detailStrontium ranelate reduces the risk of vertebral fractures in postmenopausal women with osteopenia
Sawicki, A.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Roux, C. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2004), 74(S1), 84

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See detailPatients at high risk of hip fracture benefit from treatment with strontium ranelate
Rizzoli, R.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Diaz-Curiel, M. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2004), 74(S1), 83-84

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See detailStrontium ranelate reduces the risk of vertebral fractures in osteoporotic postmenopausal women without prevalent vertebral fracture
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Rizzoli, R.; Balogh, A. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2004), 74(S1), 83

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See detailResponders to glucosamine sulfate in knee osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Pavelka, Karel; Richy, Florent et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2004), 50(suppl.1), 29

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See detailA critical analysis of the efficacy of estrogens on spinal and non-spinal fracture reduction
REGINSTER, Jean-Yves ULg; Richy, Florent; Bruyère, Olivier ULg

in Reproduction Humaine et Hormones (2004), XVII(5), 419-423

During more than 20 years, estrogens replacement therapy (ERT) has been consistently regarded as the first choice for prevention of trabecular and cortical bone loss in postmenopausal women. However ... [more ▼]

During more than 20 years, estrogens replacement therapy (ERT) has been consistently regarded as the first choice for prevention of trabecular and cortical bone loss in postmenopausal women. However, there are more doubts upon the unequivocal demonstration of the anti-fracture efficacy of ERT, at the spine and hip. Controlled clinical trials and systematic reviews were retrieved, using Medline 1970-2002 and EMBASE 1980-2002. There is a convergent body of evidence that estrogens could significantly reduce the risk of vertebral and non-vertebral fractures, providing this treatment is started early after the menopause and pursued indefinitely. In the recent perspective of the published studies, reevaluating the non-skeletal benefits and harms of ERT in post-menopausal women, other chemical entities might be better options to be used for the specific purpose of preventing or treating post-menopausal osteoporosis. [less ▲]

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See detailOsteoarthritic patients with high cartilage turnover show increased responsiveness to the cartilage protecting effects of glucosamine sulphate
Christgau, Stephan; Henrotin, Yves ULg; Tanko, Laszlo B et al

in Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology (2004), 22(1, JAN-FEB), 36-42

Objective Glucosamine sulphate has been shown in a large double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to prevent structural damage and improve clinical symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated ... [more ▼]

Objective Glucosamine sulphate has been shown in a large double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to prevent structural damage and improve clinical symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated whether early response in a newly developed biochemical marker of collagen type II degradation (CTX-II, CartiLaps ELISA) could reflect the long-term preservation of hyaline cartilage. Methods Study subjects comprised 212 knee OA patients participating in a clinical trial of the effects of glucosamine sulphate. Disease symptoms were assessed quarterly by WOMAC scoring and X-ray analysis was performed at baseline and after 3 years. Urine samples were obtained at baseline and after 1, 2 and 3 years for measurement in the CartiLaps assay. The measurements were corrected for creatinine. Results At baseline the patients had an average concentration of urinary CTX-II of 222.4 +/- 159.5 ng/mmol creatinine. This was significantly above the CTX-II levels measured in urine samples from 415 healthy controls (169.1 +/- 92.3 ng/mmol, p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the CTX-II response in the placebo group and the glucosamine treated group. However, those with high cartilage turnover presented a significant decrease in CTX-II after 12-month glucosamine treatment. Thus, thee group with CTX II concentrations above normal average + ISD decreased 15.5 % after 12-month therapy. The 12 months change in CTX-II in OA patients with elevated CTX-II at baseline correlated with the change in average joint space width observed after 36 months (R = 0.43, p < 0.05). Increased baseline levels of CTX-II were associated with a worsening of the WOMAC index (p < 0.01). Conclusion The data indicate that measurement of urinary collagen type H C-telopeptide fragments enables the identification of OA patients with high cartilage turnover who at the same time are most responsive to therapy with structure modifying drugs. [less ▲]

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See detailGlucosamine sulfate reduces osteoarthritis progression in postmenopausal women with knee osteoarthritis: evidence from two 3-year studies
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Pavelka, K.; Rovati, Lucio C et al

in Menopause (2004), 11(2), 138-143

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of glucosamine sulfate on long-term symptoms and structure progression in postmenopausal women with knee osteoarthritis (OA). DESIGN: This study consisted of a ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of glucosamine sulfate on long-term symptoms and structure progression in postmenopausal women with knee osteoarthritis (OA). DESIGN: This study consisted of a preplanned combination of two three-year, randomized, placebo-controlled, prospective, independent studies evaluating the effect of glucosamine sulfate on symptoms and structure modification in OA and post-hoc analysis of the results obtained in postmenopausal women with knee OA. Minimal joint space width was assessed at baseline and after 3 years from standing anteroposterior knee radiographs. Symptoms were scored by the algo-functional WOMAC index at baseline and after 3 years. All primary statistical analyses were performed in intention-to-treat, comparing joint space width and WOMAC changes between groups by ANOVA. RESULTS: Of 414 participants randomized in the two studies, 319 were postmenopausal women. At baseline, glucosamine sulfate and placebo groups were comparable for demographic and disease characteristics, both in the general population and in the postmenopausal women subset. After 3 years, postmenopausal participants in the glucosamine sulfate group showed no joint space narrowing [joint space change of +0.003 mm (95% CI, -0.09 to 0.11)], whereas participants in the placebo group experienced a narrowing of -0.33 mm (95% CI, -0.44 to -0.22; P < 0.0001 between the two groups). Percent changes after 3 years in the WOMAC index showed an improvement in the glucosamine sulfate group [-14.1% (95%, -22.2 to -5.9)] and a trend for worsening in the placebo group (5.4% (95% CI, -4.9 to 15.7) (P = 0.003 between the two groups). CONCLUSION: This analysis, focusing on a large cohort of postmenopausal women, demonstrated for the first time that a pharmacological intervention for OA has a disease-modifying effect in this particular population, the most frequently affected by knee OA. [less ▲]

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See detailAge- and sex-stratified prevalence of physical disabilities and handicap in the general population.
Ethgen, Olivier ULg; Gillain, Daniel ULg; Gillet, Pierre ULg et al

in Aging Clinical & Experimental Research (2004), 16(5), 389-97

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Our aim was to provide age- and sex-stratified prevalence estimates of physical disabilities and handicap in the general Belgian population. METHODS: A cross-sectional and ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Our aim was to provide age- and sex-stratified prevalence estimates of physical disabilities and handicap in the general Belgian population. METHODS: A cross-sectional and demographically representative health interview survey was conducted nationwide in Belgium in 1997. The 8836 persons aged 15 years and over who answered the health interview were included in this study. Seventeen items from the survey encompassing main activities of daily living (ADL) and confining were analyzed. To provide prevalence estimates as detailed as possible, neither aggregation nor dichotomization were applied. RESULTS: Women consistently reported more disability than men: mobility (p < 0.001), transfer in-out bed (p < 0.001), transfer in-out chair (p < 0.001), dressing (p = 0.004), washing hands and face (p = 0.029), getting to and using toilet (p = 0.003), continence (p < 0.001), seeing (p < 0.001) and mastication (p < 0.001). As expected, there was a marked trend for increased prevalence of disability with increasing age for both sexes. Moderate disability arose mainly from the 25-34 age group for both sexes. For both genders, severe disability appeared mainly at higher ages, particularly for the 65-74 age group. Nevertheless, the data suggest that continence problems for women, mobility and transfer issues for men, as well as mastication problems for both genders, clearly emerge earlier than age 65. Regarding handicap, observed prevalence rates were increasing, in age as was the case for disability, but no differences were found between men or women, except for confinement to house/garden, for which women presented a higher rate in general (p < 0.001) and in the 75-84 age group (p = 0.036) in particular. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows the wide range of disability types in the general population and their association with handicap. While elderly individuals consistently report higher degrees of disability and handicap, attention should also be paid to younger age groups. Disability calls for wide, coherent and relevant medical as well as social responses. [less ▲]

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