References of "Quinton, Loïc"
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See detailDe novo sequencing of unusual non tryptic peptides thanks to 4-sulfophenylisothiocyanate derivatization by post-source decay MALDI-MS.
Echterbille, Julien ULg; Quinton, Loïc ULg; Escoubas, Pierre et al

Poster (2013, June 11)

Introduction Due to the specificity of trypsin, tryptic peptides contain basic residues on the C-terminal side. This feature provides good ionization efficiency, and facilitates fragmentation processes ... [more ▼]

Introduction Due to the specificity of trypsin, tryptic peptides contain basic residues on the C-terminal side. This feature provides good ionization efficiency, and facilitates fragmentation processes. In the case of non tryptic peptides, the absence of basic residues at one extremity implicates lower fragmentation ratio and poor MS/MS spectra. Several methods have been developed to circumvent this drawback. Derivatization of peptides with compounds containing positive charge has been studied; Chen et al. (RCMS, 2004, 18, 191) demonstrated the simplification of CID spectra of tryptic peptides modified by 4-sulfophenylisothiocyanate. The result is a predominance of y-type ions. In this work, we evaluate the potential of SPITC for the de novo sequencing of unknown non-tryptic peptides containing disulfide bridges, i.e. peptide toxins from animal venoms. Methods 2µL of peptide solution (100 µM) were diluted in 6µL NH4HCO3 50mM (pH 8.7). As peptide toxins often contain disulfide bridges, reduction (2µL DTT 50mM, 1h at 56°C) and alkylation (2µL IAA 500mM, 1h in darkness at RT) of peptides were performed before the derivatization reaction. Peptides were then adsorbed on a C18 ZipTip micro-column followed by 10 µL of 4-sulfophenylisothiocyanate (SPITC) 50mM. The column was then incubated for 6h at 56°C. Peptides were washed by TFA 0.2% and eluted in 10µL 50/50 ACN/FA 0.1%, before being spotted in 2,5-DHB. MS experiments were performed using a Bruker Ultraflex II MALDI-TOF/TOF. FlexControl 3.0, FlexAnalysis 3.0, BioTools 3.2 and SequenceEditor 3.2 softwares (Bruker Daltonics, Bremen) were used for data acquisition and interpretation. Preliminary data According to our first results, SPITC derivatization allows in positive mode to direct the fragmentation thanks to the acidic character of the sulfonate moiety present on the modified molecule. Indeed, a large series of y-type ions is found in the CID spectra allowing determining easily large sequence tags. Moreover, the number of C-terminus ions (b- and a-type ions) decreases, which improve the simplification of MS/MS spectra. Due to this fragmentation pattern, SPITC derivatization is clearly valuable for the sequencing of peptides that are not described in databases (de novo sequencing). For example, animal venoms are composed of several hundreds of peptides that are poorly studied, up to now. These peptides display a high importance for pharmaceutical applications and their sequencing is, as a consequence, of prime interest. Peptide toxins, which are not resulting from an enzymatic digestion, are however difficult to sequence by classical MS/MS methods. In this work, we demonstrate that the modification of peptide toxins with SPITC reagent is suitable for “real” de novo sequencing. The method was applied to isolated peptides as well as chromatographic fractions that contain up to 30 toxins. The perspectives of this work rest on the study of the SPITC modified peptides in negative mode. We expect to obtain a better sensitivity due to the presence of the negative sulfonic acid group at the N-terminus extremity, and also interesting MS/MS spectra including mainly a- or b-type ions. The final challenge will be the application of the protocol to high throughput sequencing of peptide toxins from a large variety of animal venoms. Novel aspect De novo sequencing of unusual non-tryptic peptides thanks to 4-sulfophenylisothiocyanate derivatization by post-source decay MALDI-MS [less ▲]

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See detailLes venins animaux sont-ils les pharmaciens du futur?
Quinton, Loïc ULg

in Chimie Nouvelle (2013)

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See detailLes venins d'animaux, nouvelle panacée?
Echterbille, Julien ULg; Quinton, Loïc ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg

in Athena (2013)

Araignées, serpents, scorpions,… autant d’animaux ayant une place particulière dans l’imaginaire collectif. Fascinants, horripilants voire même terrifiants, les adjectifs ne manquent pas pour qualifier ... [more ▼]

Araignées, serpents, scorpions,… autant d’animaux ayant une place particulière dans l’imaginaire collectif. Fascinants, horripilants voire même terrifiants, les adjectifs ne manquent pas pour qualifier les réactions qu’ils suscitent auprès des populations. Que dire alors de la peur engendrée par leur venin. Une simple piqûre, morsure ou contact peut s’avérer extrêmement dangereux voire létal... [less ▲]

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See detailAdvances in proteomics for the FP7 Venomics project
Degueldre, Michel ULg; Quinton, Loïc ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg

Scientific conference (2013, April)

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See detailBcsTx3 is a founder of a novel sea anemone toxin family of potassium channel blocker
Orts, Diego; Moran, Yehu; Cologna, Camila et al

in FEBS Journal (2013), 280

Sea anemone venoms have become a rich source of peptide toxins which are invaluable tools for studying the structure and functions of ion channels. In this work, BcsTx3, a toxin found in the venom of a ... [more ▼]

Sea anemone venoms have become a rich source of peptide toxins which are invaluable tools for studying the structure and functions of ion channels. In this work, BcsTx3, a toxin found in the venom of a Bunodosoma caissarum (population captured at the Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago, Brazil) was purified and biochemically and pharmacologically characterized. The pharmacological effects were studied on 12 different subtypes of voltage-gated potassium channels (KV1.1–KV1.6; KV2.1; KV3.1; KV4.2; KV4.3; hERG and Shaker IR) and three cloned voltagegated sodium channel isoforms (NaV1.2, NaV1.4 and BgNaV1.1) expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. BcsTx3 shows a high affinity for Drosophila Shaker IR channels over rKv1.2, hKv1.3 and rKv1.6, and is not active on NaV channels. Biochemical characterization reveals that BcsTx3 is a 50 amino acid peptide crosslinked by four disulfide bridges, and sequence comparison allowed BcsTx3 to be classified as a novel type of sea anemone toxin acting on KV channels. Moreover, putative toxins homologous to BcsTx3 from two additional actiniarian species suggest an ancient origin of this newly discovered toxin family. [less ▲]

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See detailMALDI In-Source Decay, from sequencing to imaging
Debois, Delphine ULg; Smargiasso, Nicolas ULg; Demeure, Kevin ULg et al

in Topics in Current Chemistry (2013), 331

MALDI is now a mature method allowing the identification and, more challenging, the quantification of biopolymers (proteins, nucleic acids, glycans…). MALDI spectra show mostly intact singly charged ions ... [more ▼]

MALDI is now a mature method allowing the identification and, more challenging, the quantification of biopolymers (proteins, nucleic acids, glycans…). MALDI spectra show mostly intact singly charged ions. To obtain fragments, the activation of singly charged precursors is necessary, but not efficient above 3.5 kDa thus making MALDI MS/MS difficult for large species. In-source decay (ISD) is a prompt fragmentation reaction that can be induced thermally or by radicals. As fragments are formed in the source, precursor ions cannot be selected; however, the technique is not limited by the mass of the analyzed compounds and pseudo MS/MS can be performed on intense fragments. The discovery of new matrices that enhance the ISD yield, combined with the high sensitivity of MALDI mass spectrometers, and software development, opens new perspectives. We first review the mechanisms involved in the ISD processes, then discuss ISD applications like top-down sequencing and post-translational modifications studies, and finally review MALDI-ISD tissue imaging applications. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of a protease of biotechnological interest cloned from C. d. collilineatus venom gland
Boldrini-Franca, Johaha; Rodrigues, RS; Santos-Silva, LK et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailPeptide backbone fragmentation initiated by side-chain loss at cysteine residue in matrixassisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay mass spectrometry
Asakawa, Daiki; Smargiasso, Nicolas ULg; Quinton, Loïc ULg et al

in Journal of Mass Spectrometry [=JMS] (2013), 48

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) is initiated by hydrogen transfer from matrix molecules to the carbonyl oxygen of peptide backbone with subsequent radical-induced ... [more ▼]

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) is initiated by hydrogen transfer from matrix molecules to the carbonyl oxygen of peptide backbone with subsequent radical-induced cleavage leading to c0/z• fragments pair. MALDI-ISD is a very powerful method to obtain long sequence tags from proteins or to do de novo sequencing of peptides. Besides classical fragmentation, MALDI-ISD also shows specific fragments for which the mechanism of formation enlightened the MALDI-ISD process. In this study, the MALDI-ISD mechanism is reviewed, and a specific mechanism is studied in details: the N-terminal side of Cys residue (Xxx-Cys) is described to promote the generation of c0 and w fragments in MALDI-ISD. Our data suggest that for sequences containing Xxx-Cys motifs, the N–Ca bond cleavage occurs following the hydrogen attachment to the thiol group of Cys side-chain. The c•/w fragments pair is formed by side-chain loss of the Cys residue with subsequent radical-induced cleavage at the N–Ca bond located at the left side (N-terminal direction) of the Cys residue. This fragmentation pathway preferentially occurs at free Cys residue and is suppressedwhen the cysteines are involved in disulfide bonds. Hydrogen attachment to alkylated Cys residues using iodoacetamide gives free Cys residue by the loss of •CH2CONH2 radical. The presence of alkylated Cys residue also suppress the formation of c•/w fragments pair via the (Cb)-centered radical, whereas w fragment is still observed as intense signal. In this case, the z• fragment formed by hydrogen attachment of carbonyl oxygen followed side-chain loss at alkylated Cys leads to a w fragment. Hydrogen attachment on peptide backbone and side-chain of Cys residue occurs therefore competitively during MALDI-ISD process. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification and functional characterization of a novel αlpha-conotoxin (EIIA) from Conus ermineus
Quinton, Loïc ULg; Servent, Denis; Girard, Emmanuelle et al

in Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry (2013), 405

Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are one of the most important families in the ligand-gated ion channel superfamily due to their involvement in primordial brain functions and in several ... [more ▼]

Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are one of the most important families in the ligand-gated ion channel superfamily due to their involvement in primordial brain functions and in several neurodegenerative pathologies. The discovery of new ligands which can bind with high affinity and selectivity to nAChR subtypes is of prime interest in order to study these receptors and to potentially discover new drugs for treating various pathologies. Predatory cone snails of the genus Conus hunt their prey using venoms containing a large number of small, highly structured peptides called conotoxins. Conotoxins are classified in different structural families and target a large panel of receptors and ion channels. Interestingly, nAChRs represent the only subgroup for which Conus has developed seven distinct families of conotoxins. Conus venoms have thus received much attention as they could represent a potential source of selective ligands of nAChR subtypes. We describe the mass spectrometric based approaches which led to the discovery of a novel α-conotoxin targeting muscular nAChR from the venom of Conus ermineus. The presence of several posttranslational modifications complicated the N-terminal sequencing. To discriminate between the different possible sequences, analogs with variable N-terminus were synthesized and fragmented by MS/MS. Understanding the fragmentation pathways in the low m/z range appeared crucial to determine the right sequence. The biological activity of this novel α-conotoxin (α-EIIA) that belongs to the unusual α4/4 subfamily was determined by binding experiments. The results revealed not only its selectivity for the muscular nAChR, but also a clear discrimination between the two binding sites described for this receptor. [less ▲]

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See detailIon-Mobility mass spectrometry as a potential tool to assign disulfide bonds arrangements in peptides with multiple disulfide bridges.
Echterbille, Julien ULg; Quinton, Loïc ULg; Gilles, Nicolas et al

in Analytical Chemistry (2013)

Disulfide bridges play a major role in defining the structural properties of peptides and proteins. However, the determination of the cysteine pairing is still challenging. Peptide sequences are usually ... [more ▼]

Disulfide bridges play a major role in defining the structural properties of peptides and proteins. However, the determination of the cysteine pairing is still challenging. Peptide sequences are usually achieved using MS/MS spectra of the totally reduced unfolded species but the cysteine pairing information is lost. On the other hand, MS/MS experiments performed on native folded species show complex spectra composed of non-classical ions. MS/MS alone does not allow the cysteine pairing nor the full sequence of an unknown peptide to be determined. The major goal of this work is to set up a strategy for the full structural characterization of peptides including disulfide bridges annotation in the sequence. This strategy was developed by combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS)and Collision Induced Dissociation(CID). It is assumed that the opening of one S-S bridges in a peptide leads to a structural evolution which results in a modification of IMS drift time. In the presence of multiple S-S bridges, the shift in arrival time will depend on which disulfide(s) has (have) been reduced and on the shape adopted by the generated species. Due to specific fragmentations observed for each species, CID experiments performed after the mobility separation could provide not only information on peptide sequence, but also on the localization of the disulfide bridges. To achieve this goal, synthetic peptides containing two disulfides were studied. The openings of the bridges were carried out following different experimental conditions such as reduction, reduction/alkylation or oxidation. Due to disulfide scrambling highlighted with the reduction approaches, oxidation of S-S bonds into cysteic acids appeared to be the best strategy. Cysteines connectivity was then unambiguously determined for the two peptides, without any disulfide scrambling interference. [less ▲]

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See detailSecretion and maturation of conotoxins in the venom ducts of Conus textile
Dobson, Rowan ULg; Collodoro, Mike; Gilles, Nicolas et al

in Toxicon (2012), 60(8), 1370-1379

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See detailAdvances in proteomics for the FP7 Venomics project
Degueldre, Michel ULg; Quinton, Loïc ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg

Scientific conference (2012, April)

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See detailDisulfide bond scrambling in partially reduced and alkylated peptides revealed by Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry
Echterbille, Julien ULg; Quinton, Loïc ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg

Poster (2012, March 29)

Animal venoms are mainly composed of peptide toxins, which are highly structured by many disulfide bridges. In these toxins, disulfides play different major roles such as increasing the toxins efficiency ... [more ▼]

Animal venoms are mainly composed of peptide toxins, which are highly structured by many disulfide bridges. In these toxins, disulfides play different major roles such as increasing the toxins efficiency by lowering their immunogenicity or providing the adequate conformation to efficiently bind to the biological receptor. Peptide sequencing followed by determination of the cysteine pairings is still challenging and, therefore, an important step in structural analysis. This work was, in its beginning, focused on the development of ion mobility (IMS) based methodology used to assign disulfides. The strategy relies on the analysis of partially reduced/alkylated disulfide containing peptides. The resulting mixture is analyzed by ion mobility, followed by MS/MS acquisition on each mobility resolved species. Surprisingly, first investigations revealed, after partial reduction, a disulfide rearrangement phenomenon. Indeed, some of the cystein pairings were not those expected to be. These experiments were conducted on ¿-CnI and ¿-GI toxins purified from the venoms of Conus consors and Conus geographus marine snails, respectively. Each toxin contains four cysteines linked together with two disulfide bridges. Peptides were partially reduced by an excess of dithiothreitol and then alkylated by a large excess of iodoacetamide. The resulting mixture was purified on a microcolumn before being analyzed by nanoESI-Synapt-G2. Fragmentation was performed after the mobility cell, to obtain specific fragments of each species. Each toxin partially reduced/alkylated results, theoretically, in a mixture of fully oxidized (two disulfides oxidized), fully reduced (two disulfides reduced) and partially reduced forms (one of the two disulfides reduced). Thanks to the mass shift created by the alkylation, an isolation of the species which m/z ratio corresponds to one disulfide reduced and alkylated has been done in the quadrupole before the mobility separation. The arrival time distribution of triply charged ions reveals the presence of different species (4 in the case of ¿-GI and 2 for ¿-CnI), characterized by different relative cross sections in the gas-phase. As ion mobility resolved species give characteristic fragments upon fragmentation (after IMS), we were able to identify a scrambling of the disulfides (isomerization). In simple words, other disulfide bonds than expected ones were characterized. We suppose that the scrambling phenomenon occurs in solution,during the reduction step, since the alkylation cannot avoid rearrangement. The method is now being applied to more complex systems containing 3 or 4 disulfide bridges. The influence of the charge state on the mobility separation is systematically analyzed in terms of structural implications. [less ▲]

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See detailG protein-coupled receptors, an unexploited animal toxin targets: Exploration of green mamba venom for novel drug candidates active against adrenoceptors
Maïga, Arhamatoulaye; Mourier, Gilles; Quinton, Loïc ULg et al

in Toxicon (2012), 59

At a time when pharmaceutical companies are having trouble finding new low MW drugs and when biologics are becoming more common, animal venoms could constitute an underexploited source of novel drug ... [more ▼]

At a time when pharmaceutical companies are having trouble finding new low MW drugs and when biologics are becoming more common, animal venoms could constitute an underexploited source of novel drug candidates. We looked for identifying novel animal toxins active against G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), the most frequently exploited class of treatment targets, with the aim to develop novel research tools and drug candidates. Screening of green mamba (Dendroaspis angusticeps) venom against adrenoceptors identified two novel venom peptides. r-Da1a shown an affinity of 0.35 nM for the a1a-AR while r-Da1b displayed affinities between 14 and 73 nM for the three a2-ARs. These two venom peptides have sequences similar to those of muscarinic toxins and belong to the three-finger-fold protein family. a1a-AR is the primary target for the treatment of prostate hypertrophy. In vitro and in vivo tests demonstrated that r-Da1a reduced prostatic muscle tone as efficiently as tamsulosin (an antagonist presently used), but with fewer cardiovascular side effects. a2-ARs are the prototype of GPCRs not currently used as treatment targets due to a lack of specific ligands. Blockage of these receptors increases intestinal motility, which may be compromised by abdominal surgery and reduces orthosteric hypotension. In vitro and in vivo tests demonstrated that r-Da1b antagonizes a2-ARs in smooth muscles and increased heart rate and blood catecholamine concentrations. These results highlight possible exploitation of r-Da1a and r-Da1b in important pathologies. [less ▲]

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See detailThe usefulness of Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry for Small Molecules Analysis
Far, Johann ULg; Goscinny, Séverine ULg; Joly, Laure et al

Conference (2012, March)

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See detailMALDI In-Source Decay for High Throughput sequencing of peptide animal toxins
Quinton, Loïc ULg; Degueldre, Michel ULg; Gilles, Nicolas et al

Poster (2012)

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