References of "Quinton, Loïc"
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See detailMass-spectrometry-based method for screening of new peptide ligands for G-protein-coupled receptors
Cologna Takeno, Camila; Gilles, Nicolas; Echterbille, Julien ULg et al

in Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry (in press)

G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of transmembrane proteins. Although implicated in almost all physiological processes in the human body, most of them remain unexploited ... [more ▼]

G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of transmembrane proteins. Although implicated in almost all physiological processes in the human body, most of them remain unexploited, mostly because of the lack of specific ligands. The objective of this work is to develop a new mass-spectrometry-based technique capable of identifying new peptide ligands for GPCRs. The strategy is based on the incubation of cellular membranes overexpressing GPCRs with a mixture of peptides that contains potential ligands. Peptide ligands bind to the receptors, whereas other peptides remain in the binding buffer. Bound peptides are eluted from membranes and directly detected, identified, and characterized by MALDI TOF–TOF. The results reveal the efficacy of the procedure for selecting a specific ligand of GPCRs in both simple and complex mixtures of peptides. This new approach may offer direct purification, identification, and characterization of the new ligand in a single workflow. The proposed method is labeling-free and, unlike radio-binding and other techniques, it does not require a previously known labeled ligand of the studied GPCR. All these properties greatly reduce the experimental constraints. Moreover, because it is not based on the principle of a competitive specific binding, this technique constitutes a new tool to discover new ligands not only for known GPCRs, but also for orphan GPCRs [less ▲]

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See detailCombined use of Ion Mobility and Collision-Induced Dissociation to investigate the opening of disulfide bridges by Electron-Transfer Dissociation in peptides bearing two disulfide bonds
Massonnet, Philippe ULg; Upert, Gregory; Smargiasso, Nicolas ULg et al

in Analytical Chemistry (in press)

Disulfide bonds are post-translational modifications (PTMs) often found in peptides and proteins. They increase their stability towards enzymatic degradations, and provide the structure and (consequently ... [more ▼]

Disulfide bonds are post-translational modifications (PTMs) often found in peptides and proteins. They increase their stability towards enzymatic degradations, and provide the structure and (consequently) the activity of such folded proteins. The characterization of disulfide patterns, i.e the cysteine connectivity, is crucial to achieve a global picture of the active conformation of the protein of interest. Electron Transfer Dissociation (ETD) constitutes a valuable tool to cleave the disulfide bonds in the gas phase, avoiding chemical reduction/alkylation in solution. To characterize the cysteine pairing, the present work proposes (i) to reduce by ETD one of the two disulfide bridges of model peptides , resulting in the opening of the cyclic structures, (ii) to separate the generated species by ion-mobility and, (iii) to characterize the species using CID. Results of this strategy applied to several peptides show different behaviors depending on the connectivity. The loss of SH• radical species, observed for all the peptides, confirms the cleavage of the disulfides during the ETD process. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of Venom Peptides using Microfluidic Separation Techniques coupled to Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS and CE-MS)
Degueldre, Michel ULg; Delvaux, Cédric ULg; Far, Johann ULg et al

Poster (2015, March)

More than the half of the principal sub-kingdoms of the animal world contains species that produce venom whose purposes are to immobilize, kill and pre-digest the preys. These venoms represent an ... [more ▼]

More than the half of the principal sub-kingdoms of the animal world contains species that produce venom whose purposes are to immobilize, kill and pre-digest the preys. These venoms represent an exceptionally rich source of various biologically active peptides, both in their structures and their effects, which are more and more useful for human being1. Yet, the total characterization of such complex samples require advanced analytical techniques mainly due to the complexity of the sample (hundreds of compounds), the limited quantities usually available and the presence of numerous PTMs, especially disulfide bridges and specific folding. Here we present a method that combines LC and CE separation techniques coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) to characterize the peptide composition of the snake venom Naja atra. The characterization will not only focus on the toxin sequencing (LC-MS and LC-MS/MS), but will also aim at analyzing the folding of the toxins (CE-MS). To this end, native and reduced/alkylated toxins will be analyzed by both techniques. Final result targets the determination of the global hydrophobic pattern and native tridimensional folding of these strongly reticulated peptides. (1) Richard J. Lewis & Maria L. Garcia, Therapeutic potential of venom peptides. Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 2003, 2, 790-802. [less ▲]

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See detailAdvances in proteomics for the FP7 Venomics project
Degueldre, Michel ULg; Quinton, Loïc ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg

Conference (2014, December 03)

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See detailDevelopment of a high throughput de novo sequencing platform for peptidic toxins combining proteomics and transcriptomics
Degueldre, Michel ULg; Verdenaud, Marion; Zuniga, Sheila et al

Poster (2014, November 07)

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See detailIon mobility-mass spectrometry to perform structural classifications of disulfide-bridged-peptides
Massonnet, Philippe ULg; Upert, Gregory; Morsa, Denis ULg et al

Poster (2014, November)

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See detailNew mass spectrometry based methodology to sequence a whole snake venom
Echterbille, Julien ULg; Boulanger, Madeleine; Degueldre, Michel ULg et al

Poster (2014, February 10)

Animal venoms are complex chemical cocktails, comprising wide ranges of biologically active reticulated peptides that target with high selectivity and efficacy varieties of membrane receptors. Assuming ... [more ▼]

Animal venoms are complex chemical cocktails, comprising wide ranges of biologically active reticulated peptides that target with high selectivity and efficacy varieties of membrane receptors. Assuming the fact that each of the 170,000 venomous species reported can produce more than 250 bioactive toxins, at least 40,000,000 bioactive peptides and proteins may be discovered. Among the four described species of mambas, Eastern Jameson’s mamba (Dendroaspis jamesonii kaimosae) venom is the less characterized since only 9 peptides are referenced in database. This work aims at developing a new strategy devoted to the deep analysis of animal venoms. Our approach consists in a first separation of the venom using cation exchange chromatography. Each primary fraction is then purified a second time by classical RP-HPLC. A total of 328 fractions, containing amongst 1 and 4 toxins, are finally collected. MALDI-MS analysis of each fraction is done in order (1) to obtain information about masses and (2) to obtain sequences of toxins thanks to MALDI-In Source Decay (ISD) dissociation coupled with on MALDI target plate reduction of the peptides. ISD has already been demonstrated efficient for toxin sequencing, and especially when using 1,5-DAN as reducing matrix. ISD yields to sequences that cover more than 50% of peptide sequences by series of singly charged c-type ions. Thanks to this methodology, we were able to obtain 85% of satisfactory results i.e. spectra giving quite long tags of amino acids (up to 20 residues). As a way to validate our method, a tag coming from ISD spectrum interpretation has found a match in database for an Eastern Jameson’s mamba toxin. The global sequence has then been obtained by extrapolation on the ISD spectrum. Since ISD spectra are simpler than classical MS/MS spectra, automation of spectra interpretation, difficult with other fragmentation techniques (CID, ETD…), is implementable. In the near future, sequences obtained with this approach will be used to direct tests of biological activity through sequence homologies with already known ligands for different kinds of membrane receptors. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluences of proline and cysteine residues on fragment yield in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay mass spectrometry
Asakawa, Daiki; Smargiasso, Nicolas ULg; Quinton, Loïc ULg et al

in Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry (2014)

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See detailAdvances in proteomics for the FP7 Venomics project - Disulfide bridge assignement task
Massonnet, Philippe ULg; Upert, Gregory; Pastor, Alexandra et al

Scientific conference (2013, December 18)

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See detailAttribution of Cysteine Connectivities in small toxins - New Prospects Based on Partial Oxidation/Reduction Experiments and Ion-Mobility Mass Spectrometry
Quinton, Loïc ULg; Massonnet, Philippe ULg; Echterbille, Julien ULg et al

Conference (2013, December)

Disulfide bonds are post-translational modifications often found in biological compounds and especially in animal toxins. Disulfide bonds participate in the formation of specific folding of peptides and ... [more ▼]

Disulfide bonds are post-translational modifications often found in biological compounds and especially in animal toxins. Disulfide bonds participate in the formation of specific folding of peptides and proteins, directly related to their biological activity. Cystein pairing determinations are primordial for the synthesis of chemical homologous displaying the same bioactivity than the natural compound. This task appears already difficult when the cysteine pairings have to be determined from large proteins. The combination of physical and chemical techniques such as NMR, enzymatic proteolysis, liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, is needed to circumvent this difficulty. However, when the work concerns small compounds such as conotoxins, the problem is much more complex due to the low amount of available compound and to the lack of enzymatic cleavage sites between cysteines. In this study, we investigate the case of small peptides that contain two disulphide bonds. The idea is to determine the cystein pairings in such compounds by a chemical partial reduction (or oxidation) of the peptides, followed by the separation of the generated species by ion-mobility mass spectrometry, and their characterisation by tandem mass spectrometry. Up to now, we have investigated the partial reduction not only in solution (with DTT and TCEP) but also in the gas-phase (Electron transfer dissociation), and partial oxidation in solution (with 3-CPBA). The results demonstrate an unexpected complexity of the data, including low fragmentation ratios of peptides and disulfide scramblings. [less ▲]

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See detailPeptidomic comparison and characterization of the major components of the venom of the giant ant Dinoponera quadriceps collected in four different areas of Brazil.
Cologna, Camila Takeno; Cardoso, Jaqueline Dos Santos; Jourdan, Emmanuel et al

in Journal of Proteomics (2013), 94

Despite the noxious effects inflicted by Dinoponera ant's envenomation, the information about the biological properties and composition of their venom is still very limited. Ants from the genus Dinoponera ... [more ▼]

Despite the noxious effects inflicted by Dinoponera ant's envenomation, the information about the biological properties and composition of their venom is still very limited. Ants from the genus Dinoponera are believed to be the world's largest living ants with a body length of 3cm. Their occurrence is restricted to tropical areas of South America. In this work, we study the venom of the giant Dinoponera quadriceps ant collected in 4 different regions of Brazil. By using a combination of complementary mass spectrometric approaches, we aim at: (i) characterizing the venom composition of these ants; (ii) establishing a comparative analysis of the venom from four geographically different regions in Brazil. This approach demonstrates that ant venom is a copious source of new compounds. Several peptides were identified and selected for "de novo sequencing". Since most of the new peptides showed similarities with antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), antimicrobial assays were performed with the purpose of evaluating their activity. In regard to the comparative study of the four regions, we observed not only major differences in the venom compositions, but also that the venoms collected in closest areas are more similar than the ones collected in distant regions. These observations seem to highlight an adaption of the ant venoms to the local environment. Concerning the biological assays, the peptides called Dq-3162 and Da-3177 showed a wide-ranging antimicrobial activity. The characterization of new AMPs with a broad spectrum of activity and different scaffolds may aid scientists to design new therapeutic agents and understand the mechanisms of those peptides to interact with microbial membranes. The results obtained betoken the biotechnological potential of ant's venom. BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE: For the first time this manuscript describes an extensive proteomics characterization of the D. quadriceps venom. In addition this study reports the variation in venom composition of primitive ants from 4 geographically different areas of Brazil. The results reveal the presence of ~335 compounds for each venom/area and inter-colony variations were observed. 16 new peptides were characterized and 2 of them were synthesized and biologically assayed. These findings highlight the considerable and still unexplored diversity of ant's venom which could be used as valuable research tools in different areas of knowledge. [less ▲]

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See detailStructural characterization of disulfide-bridged-peptides by a combined use of ETD, CID and Ion-Mobility mass spectrometry
Massonnet, Philippe ULg; Upert, Gregory; Pastor, Alexandra et al

Conference (2013, September 05)

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See detailUse of 1,5-diaminonaphthalene to combine matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay fragmentation with hydrogen/deuterium exchange
Lemaire, Pascale; Debois, Delphine ULg; Smargiasso, Nicolas ULg et al

in Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry [=RCM] (2013), 27(16), 1837-1846

In-Source Decay (ISD) in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry is a fast and easy top-down activation method. Our objective is to find a suitable matrix to locate the ... [more ▼]

In-Source Decay (ISD) in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry is a fast and easy top-down activation method. Our objective is to find a suitable matrix to locate the deuterons following in-solution hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX). This matrix must circumvent the commonly encountered undesired back-exchange reactions, in order to preserve the regioselective deuteration pattern. The 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (1,5-DAN) matrix is known to be suitable for MALDI-ISD fragmentation. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) was employed to compare 1,5-DAN and other commonly used MALDI matrices with respect to the extent of back-exchange and the uniformity of the H/D exchange profiles within the MALDI spots. We tested the back-exchange on the highly sensitive amyloid-beta peptide (1-40), and proved the regioselectivity on ubiquitin and b-endorphin. MALDI-MSI results show that 1,5-DAN leads to the least back-exchange over all the spot. MALDI-ISD fragmentation combined with H/D exchange using 1,5-DAN matrix was validated by localizing deuterons in native ubiquitin. Results agree with previous data obtained by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Electron Transfer Dissociation (ETD). Moreover, 1,5-DAN matrix was used to study the H/D exchange profile of the methanol-induced helical structure of b-endorphin, and the relative protection can be explained by the polarity of residues involved in hydrogen bond formation. We found that controlling crystallization is the most important parameter when combining H/D exchange with MALDI. The 1,5-DAN matrix is characterized by a fast crystallization kinetics, and therefore gives robust and reliable H/D exchange profiles using MALDI-ISD. [less ▲]

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