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See detailWASP-54b, WASP-56b and WASP-57b: Three new sub-Jupiter mass planets from SuperWASP
Faedi, F.; Pollacco, D.; Barros, S. C. C. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 551

We present three newly discovered sub-Jupiter mass planets from the SuperWASP survey: WASP-54b is a heavily bloated planet of mass 0.636+0.025-0.024RJ. It orbits a F9 star, evolving off the main sequence ... [more ▼]

We present three newly discovered sub-Jupiter mass planets from the SuperWASP survey: WASP-54b is a heavily bloated planet of mass 0.636+0.025-0.024RJ. It orbits a F9 star, evolving off the main sequence, every 3.69 days. Our MCMC fit of the system yields a slightly eccentric orbit (e = 0.067+0.033-0.025) for WASP-54b. We investigated further the veracity of our detection of the eccentric orbit for WASP-54b, and we find that it could be real. However, given the brightness of WASP-54 V = 10.42 mag, we encourage observations of a secondary eclipse to draw robust conclusions on both the orbital eccentricity and the thermal structure of the planet. WASP-56b and WASP-57b have masses of 0.571+0.034-0.035MJ and 0.672+0.049-0.046MJ, respectively; and radii of 1.092+0.035-0.033RJ for WASP-56b and 0.916+0.017-0.014RJ for WASP-57b. They orbit main sequence stars of spectral type G6 every 4.67 and 2.84 days, respectively. WASP-56b and WASP-57b show no radius anomaly and a high density possibly implying a large core of heavy elements; possibly as high as ~50 M⊕ in the case of WASP-57b. However,the composition of the deep interior of exoplanets remains still undetermined. Thus, more exoplanet discoveries such as the ones presented in this paper, are needed to understand and constrain giant planets' physical properties. [less ▲]

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See detailThe CORALIE survey for southern extrasolar planets XVII. New and updated long period and massive planets
Marmier, M.; Ségransan, D.; Udry, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 551

Context. Since 1998, a planet-search program around main sequence stars within 50 pc in the southern hemisphere has been carried out with the CORALIE echelle spectrograph at La Silla Observatory. Aims ... [more ▼]

Context. Since 1998, a planet-search program around main sequence stars within 50 pc in the southern hemisphere has been carried out with the CORALIE echelle spectrograph at La Silla Observatory. Aims: With an observing time span of more than 14 years, the CORALIE survey is now able to unveil Jovian planets on Jupiter's period domain. This growing period-interval coverage is important for building formation and migration models since observational constraints are still weak for periods beyond the ice line. Methods: Long-term precise Doppler measurements with the CORALIE echelle spectrograph, together with a few additional observations made with the HARPS spectrograph on the ESO 3.6 m telescope, reveal radial velocity signatures of massive planetary companions on long-period orbits. Results: In this paper we present seven new planets orbiting HD 27631, HD 98649, HD 106515A, HD 166724, HD 196067, HD 219077, and HD 220689, together with the CORALIE orbital parameters for three already known planets around HD 10647, HD 30562, and HD 86226. The period range of the new planetary companions goes from 2200 to 5500 days and covers a mass domain between 1 and 10.5 MJup. Surprisingly, five of them present very high eccentricities above e > 0.57. A pumping scenario by Kozai mechanism may be invoked for HD 106515Ab and HD 196067b, which are both orbiting stars in multiple systems. Since the presence of a third massive body cannot be inferred from the data of HD 98649b, HD 166724b, and HD 219077b, the origin of the eccentricity of these systems remains unknown. Except for HD 10647b, no constraint on the upper mass of the planets is provided by Hipparcos astrometric data. Finally, the hosts of these long period planets show no metallicity excess. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-80b: a gas giant transiting a cool dwarf
Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 551

We report the discovery of a planet transiting the star <ASTROBJ>WASP-80</ASTROBJ> (<ASTROBJ>1SWASP J201240.26-020838.2</ASTROBJ>; <ASTROBJ>2MASS J20124017-0208391</ASTROBJ>; <ASTROBJ>TYC 5165-481-1 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a planet transiting the star <ASTROBJ>WASP-80</ASTROBJ> (<ASTROBJ>1SWASP J201240.26-020838.2</ASTROBJ>; <ASTROBJ>2MASS J20124017-0208391</ASTROBJ>; <ASTROBJ>TYC 5165-481-1</ASTROBJ>; <ASTROBJ>BPM 80815</ASTROBJ>; V = 11.9, K = 8.4). Our analysis shows this is a 0.55 ± 0.04 M[SUB]jup[/SUB], 0.95 ± 0.03 R[SUB]jup[/SUB] gas giant on a circular 3.07 day orbit around a star with a spectral type between K7V and M0V. This system produces one of the largest transit depths so far reported, making it a worthwhile target for transmission spectroscopy. We find a large discrepancy between the vsini[SUB]⋆[/SUB] inferred from stellar line broadening and the observed amplitude of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. This can be understood either by an orbital plane nearly perpendicular to the stellar spin or by an additional, unaccounted for source of broadening. Using WASP-South photometric observations, from Sutherland (South Africa), confirmed with the 60 cm TRAPPIST robotic telescope, EulerCam, and the CORALIE spectrograph on the Swiss 1.2 m Euler Telescope, and HARPS on the ESO 3.6 m (Prog ID 089.C-0151), all three located at La Silla Observatory, Chile.Radial velocity and photometric data are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr">cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr</A>(<A href="http://130.79.128.5">130.79.128.5</A>) or via <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/551/A80">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/551/A80</A> [less ▲]

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See detailAccurate spectroscopic parameters of WASP planet host stars
Doyle, Amanda P.; Smalley, B.; Maxted, P. F. L. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2013), 428(4), 3164-3172

We have made a detailed spectral analysis of eleven Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) planet host stars using high signal-to-noise (S/N) HARPS spectra. Our line list was carefully selected from the ... [more ▼]

We have made a detailed spectral analysis of eleven Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) planet host stars using high signal-to-noise (S/N) HARPS spectra. Our line list was carefully selected from the spectra of the Sun and Procyon, and we made a critical evaluation of the atomic data. The spectral lines were measured using equivalent widths. The procedures were tested on the Sun and Procyon prior to be being used on the WASP stars. The effective temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity and metallicity were determined for all the stars. We show that abundances derived from high S/N spectra are likely to be higher than those obtained from low S/N spectra, as noise can cause the equivalent width to be underestimated. We also show that there is a limit to the accuracy of stellar parameters that can be achieved, despite using high S/N spectra, and the average uncertainty in effective temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity and metallicity is 83 K, 0.11 dex, 0.11 km/s and 0.10 dex respectively. [less ▲]

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See detailThe HARPS search for southern extra-solar planets: XXXI. The M-dwarf sample
Bonfils, X.; Delfosse, X.; Udry, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 549

(Abridged) Searching for planets around stars with different masses probes the outcome of planetary formation for different initial conditions. This drives observations of a sample of 102 southern nearby ... [more ▼]

(Abridged) Searching for planets around stars with different masses probes the outcome of planetary formation for different initial conditions. This drives observations of a sample of 102 southern nearby M dwarfs, using a fraction of our guaranteed time on the ESO/HARPS spectrograph (Feb. 11th, 2003 to Apr. 1st 2009). This paper makes available the sample's time series, presents their precision and variability. We apply systematic searches and diagnostics to discriminate whether the observed Doppler shifts are caused by stellar surface inhomogeneities or by the radial pull of orbiting planets. We recover the planetary signals corresponding to 9 planets already announced by our group (Gl176b, Gl581b, c, d & e, Gl674b, Gl433b, Gl 667Cb and c). We present radial velocities that confirm GJ 849 hosts a Jupiter-mass planet, plus a long-term radial-velocity variation. We also present RVs that precise the planetary mass and period of Gl 832b. We detect long-term RV changes for Gl 367, Gl 680 and Gl 880 betraying yet unknown long-period companions. We identify candidate signals in the radial-velocity time series and demonstrate they are most probably caused by stellar surface inhomogeneities. Finally, we derive a first estimate of the occurrence of M-dwarf planets as a function of their minimum mass and orbital period. In particular, we find that giant planets (m sin i = 100-1,000 Mearth) have a low frequency (e.g. f<1% for P=1-10 d and f=0.02^{+0.03}_{-0.01} for P=10-100 d), whereas super-Earths (m sin i = 1-10 Mearth) are likely very abundant (f=0.36^{+0.25}_{-0.10} for P=1-10 d and f=0.35^{+0.45}_{-0.11} for P=10-100 d). We also obtained eta_earth=0.41^{+0.54}_{-0.13}, the frequency of habitable planets orbiting M dwarfs (1<m sin i<10 Mearth). For the first time, eta_earth is a direct measure and not a number extrapolated from the statistic of more massive and/or shorter-period planets. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-77 Ab: A Transiting Hot Jupiter Planet in a Wide Binary System<xref ref-type="fn" rid="fn1">1</xref>
Maxted, P. F. L.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A. et al

in Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (2013), 125

We report the discovery of a transiting planet with an orbital period of 1.36 days orbiting the brighter component of the visual binary star BD 07 436. The host star, WASP-77 A, is a moderately bright G8 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a transiting planet with an orbital period of 1.36 days orbiting the brighter component of the visual binary star BD 07 436. The host star, WASP-77 A, is a moderately bright G8 V star (V=10.3) with a metallicity close to solar ([Fe/H] = 0.0 ± 0.1). The companion star, WASP-77 B, is a K-dwarf approximately 2 mag fainter at a separation of approximately 3″. The spectrum of WASP-77 A shows emission in the cores of the Caii H and K lines, indicative of moderate chromospheric activity. The Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) light curves show photometric variability with a period of 15.3 days and an amplitude of about 0.3% that is probably due to the magnetic activity of the host star. We use an analysis of the combined photometric and spectroscopic data to derive the mass and radius of the planet (1.76 ± 0.06 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB], 1.21 ± 0.02 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]). The age of WASP-77 A estimated from its rotation rate (˜1 Gyr) agrees with the age estimated in a similar way for WASP-77 B (˜0.6 Gyr) but is in poor agreement with the age inferred by comparing its effective temperature and density to stellar models (˜8 Gyr). Follow-up observations of WASP-77 Ab will make a useful contribution to our understanding of the influence of binarity and host star activity on the properties of hot Jupiters. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalysis of Spin-Orbit Alignment in the WASP-32, WASP-38, and HAT-P-27/WASP-40 Systems
Brown, D. J. A.; Collier Cameron, A.; Díaz, R. F. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2012), 760

We present measurements of the spin-orbit alignment angle, λ, for the hot Jupiter systems WASP-32, WASP-38, and HAT-P-27/WASP-40, based on data obtained using the HARPS spectrograph. We analyze the ... [more ▼]

We present measurements of the spin-orbit alignment angle, λ, for the hot Jupiter systems WASP-32, WASP-38, and HAT-P-27/WASP-40, based on data obtained using the HARPS spectrograph. We analyze the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for all three systems and also carry out Doppler tomography for WASP-32 and WASP-38. We find that WASP-32 (T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 6140[SUP]+90[/SUP] [SUB]- 100[/SUB] K) is aligned, with an alignment angle of λ = 10fdg5[SUP] + 6.4[/SUP] [SUB] - 6.5[/SUB] obtained through tomography, and that WASP-38 (T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 6180[SUP]+40[/SUP] [SUB]- 60[/SUB] K) is also aligned, with tomographic analysis yielding λ = 7fdg5[SUP] + 4.7[/SUP] [SUB] - 6.1[/SUB]. The latter result provides an order-of-magnitude improvement in the uncertainty in λ compared to the previous analysis of Simpson et al. We are only able to loosely constrain the angle for HAT-P-27/WASP-40 (T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5190[SUP]+160[/SUP] [SUB]- 170[/SUB] K) to λ = 24fdg2[SUP] + 76.0[/SUP] [SUB] - 44.5[/SUB], owing to the poor signal-to-noise ratio of our data. We consider this result a non-detection under a slightly updated version of the alignment test of Brown et al. We place our results in the context of the full sample of spin-orbit alignment measurements, finding that they provide further support for previously established trends. Based on observations (under proposal 087.C-0649) made using the HARPS High Resolution Échelle Spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6 m at the ESO La Silla observatory. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission XXI. CoRoT-19b: A low density planet orbiting an old inactive F9V-star
Guenther, E. W.; Diaz, R. F.; Gazzano, J*-C et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 537

Observations of transiting extrasolar planets are of key importance to our understanding of planets because their mass, radius, and mass density can be determined. The CoRoT space mission allows us to ... [more ▼]

Observations of transiting extrasolar planets are of key importance to our understanding of planets because their mass, radius, and mass density can be determined. The CoRoT space mission allows us to achieve a very high photometric accuracy. By combining CoRoT data with high-precision radial velocity measurements, we derive precise planetary radii and masses. We report the discovery of CoRoT-19b, a gas-giant planet transiting an old, inactive F9V-type star with a period of four days. After excluding alternative physical configurations mimicking a planetary transit signal, we determine the radius and mass of the planet by combining CoRoT photometry with high-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the echelle spectrographs SOPHIE, HARPS, FIES, and SANDIFORD. To improve the precision of its ephemeris and the epoch, we observed additional transits with the TRAPPIST and Euler telescopes. Using HARPS spectra obtained during the transit, we then determine the projected angle between the spin of the star and the orbit of the planet. We find that the host star of CoRoT-19b is an inactive F9V-type star close to the end of its main-sequence life. The host star has a mass M*=1.21+/-0.05 Msun and radius R*=1.65+/-0.04 Rsun. The planet has a mass of Mp=1.11+/-0.06 Mjup and radius of Rp=1.29+/-0.03 Rjup. The resulting bulk density is only rho=0.71+/-0.06 gcm-3, which is much lower than that for Jupiter. The exoplanet CoRoT-19b is an example of a giant planet of almost the same mass as Jupiter but a 30% larger radius. [less ▲]

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See detailA hot Uranus transiting the nearby M dwarf GJ 3470. Detected with HARPS velocimetry. Captured in transit with TRAPPIST photometry
Bonfils, X.; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Udry, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 546

We report on the discovery of GJ 3470 b, a transiting hot Uranus of mass m[SUB]p[/SUB] = 14.0 ± 1.8 M[SUB]⊕[/SUB], radius R[SUB]p[/SUB] = 4.2 ± 0.6 R[SUB]⊕[/SUB] and period P = 3.3371 ± 0.0002 day. Its ... [more ▼]

We report on the discovery of GJ 3470 b, a transiting hot Uranus of mass m[SUB]p[/SUB] = 14.0 ± 1.8 M[SUB]⊕[/SUB], radius R[SUB]p[/SUB] = 4.2 ± 0.6 R[SUB]⊕[/SUB] and period P = 3.3371 ± 0.0002 day. Its host star is a nearby (d = 25.2 ± 2.9 pc) M1.5 dwarf of mass M[SUB]⋆[/SUB] = 0.54 ± 0.07 M[SUB]&sun;[/SUB] and radius R[SUB]⋆[/SUB] = 0.50 ± 0.06 R[SUB]&sun;[/SUB]. The detection was made during a radial-velocity campaign with Harps that focused on the search for short-period planets orbiting M dwarfs. Once the planet was discovered and the transit-search window narrowed to about 10% of an orbital period, a photometric search started with Trappist and quickly detected the ingress of the planet. Additional observations with Trappist, EulerCam and Nites definitely confirmed the transiting nature of GJ 3470b and allowed the determination of its true mass and radius. The star's visible or infrared brightness (V[SUP]mag[/SUP] = 12.3, K[SUP]mag[/SUP] = 8.0), together with a large eclipse depth D = 0.57 ± 0.05%, ranks GJ 3470 b among the most suitable planets for follow-up characterizations. Based on observations made with the HARPS instrument on the ESO 3.6 m telescope under the program IDs 183.C-0437 at Cerro La Silla (Chile).Our radial-velocity and photometric time series are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/546/A27">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/546/A27</A> [less ▲]

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See detailSeven transiting hot-Jupiters from WASP-South, Euler and TRAPPIST: WASP-47b, WASP-55b, WASP-61b, WASP-62b, WASP-63b, WASP-66b & WASP-67b
Hellier, Coel; Anderson, D R; Collier Cameron, A et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2012), 426

We present seven new transiting hot Jupiters from the WASP-South survey. The planets are all typical hot Jupiters orbiting stars from F4 to K0 with magnitudes of V = 10.3 to 12.5. The orbital periods are ... [more ▼]

We present seven new transiting hot Jupiters from the WASP-South survey. The planets are all typical hot Jupiters orbiting stars from F4 to K0 with magnitudes of V = 10.3 to 12.5. The orbital periods are all in the range 3.9--4.6 d, the planetary masses range from 0.4--2.3 Mjup and the radii from 1.1--1.4 Mjup. In line with known hot Jupiters, the planetary densities range from Jupiter-like to inflated (rho = 0.13--1.07 rho_jup). We use the increasing numbers of known hot Jupiters to investigate the distribution of their orbital periods and the 3--4-d "pile-up". [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in the CoRoT LRa01 field
Carone, L.; Gandolfi, D.; Cabrera, J. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 538

Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission whose primary goals are stellar seismology and extrasolar planets search. Its surveys of large stellar fields generate numerous planetary candidates whose ... [more ▼]

Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission whose primary goals are stellar seismology and extrasolar planets search. Its surveys of large stellar fields generate numerous planetary candidates whose lightcurves have transit-like features. An extensive analytical and observational follow-up effort is undertaken to classify these candidates. Aims: The list of planetary transit candidates from the CoRoT LRa01 star field in the Monoceros constellation towards the Galactic anti-center is presented. The CoRoT observations of LRa01 lasted from 24 October 2007 to 3 March 2008. Methods: 7470 chromatic and 3938 monochromatic lightcurves were acquired and analysed. Instrumental noise and stellar variability were treated with several filtering tools by different teams from the CoRoT community. Different transit search algorithms were applied to the lightcurves. Results: Fifty-one stars were classified as planetary transit candidates in LRa01. Thirty-seven (i.e., 73 % of all candidates) are "good" planetary candidates based on photometric analysis only. Thirty-two (i.e., 87 % of the "good" candidates) have been followed-up. At the time of this writing twenty-two cases have been solved and five planets have been discovered: three transiting hot-Jupiters (CoRoT-5b, CoRoT-12b, and CoRoT-21b), the first terrestrial transiting planet (CoRoT-7b), and another planet in the same system (CoRoT-7c, detected by radial velocity survey only). Evidences of another non-transiting planet in the CoRoT-7 system, namely CoRoT-7d, have been recently found. [less ▲]

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See detailImproved precision on the radius of the nearby super-Earth 55 Cnc e
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Demory, B.-O.; Benneke, B. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 539

We report on new transit photometry for the super-Earth 55 Cnc e obtained with Warm Spitzer/IRAC at 4.5 microns. An individual analysis of these new data leads to a planet radius of 2.21-0.16+0.15 Rearth ... [more ▼]

We report on new transit photometry for the super-Earth 55 Cnc e obtained with Warm Spitzer/IRAC at 4.5 microns. An individual analysis of these new data leads to a planet radius of 2.21-0.16+0.15 Rearth, in good agreement with the values previously derived from the MOST and Spitzer transit discovery data. A global analysis of both Spitzer transit time-series improves the precision on the radius of the planet at 4.5 microns to 2.20+-0.12 Rearth. We also performed an independent analysis of the MOST data, paying particular attention to the influence of the systematic effects of instrumental origin on the derived parameters and errors by including them in a global model instead of performing a preliminary detrending-filtering processing. We deduce from this reanalysis of MOST data an optical planet radius of 2.04+-0.15 Rearth that is consistent with our Spitzer infrared radius. Assuming the achromaticity of the transit depth, we performed a global analysis combining Spitzer and MOST data that results in a planet radius of 2.17+-0.10 Rearth (13,820+-620 km). These results confirm that the most probable composition of 55 Cnc e is an envelope of supercritical water above a rocky nucleus. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-36b: A new transiting planet around a metal-poor G-dwarf, and an analysis of correlated noise in transit light curves
Smith, A. M. S.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A. et al

in Astronomical Journal (The) (2012), 143(4), 10

We report the discovery, from WASP and CORALIE, of a transiting exoplanet in a 1.54-d orbit. The host star, WASP-36, is a magnitude 12.7, metal-poor G2 dwarf (Teff = 5881 +/- 137 K), with [Fe/H] = -0.31 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery, from WASP and CORALIE, of a transiting exoplanet in a 1.54-d orbit. The host star, WASP-36, is a magnitude 12.7, metal-poor G2 dwarf (Teff = 5881 +/- 137 K), with [Fe/H] = -0.31 +/- 0.12. We determine the planet to have mass and radius respectively 2.27 +/- 0.07 and 1.27 +/- 0.03 times that of Jupiter. We have eight partial or complete transit light curves, from four different observatories, which allows us to investigate the extent to which red noise in follow-up light curves affects the fitted system parameters. We find that the solutions obtained by analysing each of these light curves independently are consistent with our global fit to all the data, despite the apparent presence of correlated noise in at least two of the light curves. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XXIII. CoRoT-21b: a doomed large Jupiter around a faint subgiant star
Pätzold, M.; Endl, M.; Csizmadia, Sz et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 545

CoRoT-21, a F8IV star of magnitude V = 16 mag, was observed by the space telescope CoRoT during the Long Run 01 (LRa01) in the first winter field (constellation Monoceros) from October 2007 to March 2008 ... [more ▼]

CoRoT-21, a F8IV star of magnitude V = 16 mag, was observed by the space telescope CoRoT during the Long Run 01 (LRa01) in the first winter field (constellation Monoceros) from October 2007 to March 2008. Transits were discovered during the light curve processing. Radial velocity follow-up observations, however, were performed mainly by the 10-m Keck telescope in January 2010. The companion CoRoT-21b is a Jupiter-like planet of 2.26 ± 0.33 Jupiter masses and 1.30 ± 0.14 Jupiter radii in an circular orbit of semi-major axis 0.0417 ± 0.0011 AU and an orbital period of 2.72474 ± 0.00014 days. The planetary bulk density is (1.36 ± 0.48) × 10[SUP]3[/SUP] kg m[SUP]-3[/SUP], very similar to the bulk density of Jupiter, and follows an M[SUP]1/3[/SUP] - R relation like Jupiter. The F8IV star is a sub-giant star of 1.29 ± 0.09 solar masses and 1.95 ± 0.2 solar radii. The star and the planet exchange extremetidal forces that will lead to orbital decay and extreme spin-up of the stellar rotation within 800 Myr if the stellar dissipation is Q[SUB]∗[/SUB]/k[SUB]2∗[/SUB] ≤ 10[SUP]7[/SUP]. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailXX. CoRoT-20b: A very high density, high eccentricity transiting giant planet
Deleuil, M.; Bonomo, A. S.; Ferraz-Mello, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 538

We report the discovery by the CoRoT space mission of a new giant planet, CoRoT-20b. The planet has a mass of 4.24 +/- 0.23 MJ and a radius of 0.84 +/- 0.04 RJ. With a mean density of 8.87 +/- 1.10 g/cm^3 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery by the CoRoT space mission of a new giant planet, CoRoT-20b. The planet has a mass of 4.24 +/- 0.23 MJ and a radius of 0.84 +/- 0.04 RJ. With a mean density of 8.87 +/- 1.10 g/cm^3, it is among the most compact planets known so far. Evolution models for the planet suggest a mass of heavy elements of the order of 800 ME if embedded in a central core, requiring a revision either of the planet formation models or of planet evolution and structure models. We note however that smaller amounts of heavy elements are expected from more realistic models in which they are mixed throughout the envelope. The planet orbits a G-type star with an orbital period of 9.24 days and an eccentricity of 0.56. The star's projected rotational velocity is vsini = 4.5 +/- 1.0 km/s, corresponding to a spin period of 11.5 +/- 3.1 days if its axis of rotation is perpendicular to the orbital plane. In the framework of Darwinian theories and neglecting stellar magnetic breaking, we calculate the tidal evolution of the system and show that CoRoT-20b is presently one of the very few Darwin-stable planets that is evolving towards a triple synchronous state with equality of the orbital, planetary and stellar spin periods. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-42 b and WASP-49 b: two new transiting sub-Jupiters
Lendl, M; Anderson, D R; Collier-Cameron, A et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 544

We report the discovery of two new transiting planets from the WASP survey. WASP-42 b is a 0.500 +- 0.035 M_J planet orbiting a K1 star at a separation of 0.0548 +- 0.0017 AU with a period of 4.9816872 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of two new transiting planets from the WASP survey. WASP-42 b is a 0.500 +- 0.035 M_J planet orbiting a K1 star at a separation of 0.0548 +- 0.0017 AU with a period of 4.9816872 +- 0.0000073 days. The radius of WASP-42 is 1.080 +- 0.057 R_J while its equilibrium temperature is T_eq = 995 +- 34 K. We detect some evidence of a small but non-zero eccentricity of e = 0.060 +- 0.013. WASP-49 b is a 0.378 +- 0.027 M_J planet around an old G6 star. It has a period of 2.7817387 +- 5.6 x 10-6 days and a separation of 0.0379 +- 0.0011 AU. This planet is slightly bloated, having a radius of 1.115 +- 0.056 R_J and an equilibrium temperature of T_eq = 1369 +- 42 K. Both planets have been followed up intensively in photometry, in total we have obtained 5 full and one partial transit light curves of WASP-42 and 4 full and one partial light curves of WASP-49 using the Euler-Swiss, TRAPPIST and Faulkes South telescopes. [less ▲]

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See detailThe TRAPPIST survey of southern transiting planets. I. Thirty eclipses of the ultra-short period planet WASP-43 b
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Triaud, A H M J; Fortney, J. J. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 542

We present twenty-three transit light curves and seven occultation light curves for the ultra-short period planet WASP-43 b, in addition to eight new measurements of the radial velocity of the star ... [more ▼]

We present twenty-three transit light curves and seven occultation light curves for the ultra-short period planet WASP-43 b, in addition to eight new measurements of the radial velocity of the star. Thanks to this extensive data set, we improve significantly the parameters of the system. Notably, the largely improved precision on the stellar density (2.41 ± 0.08 ρsun) combined with constraining the age to be younger than a Hubble time allows us to break the degeneracy of the stellar solution mentioned in the discovery paper. The resulting stellar mass and size are 0.717 ± 0.025 Msun and 0.667 ± 0.011 Rsun. Our deduced physical parameters for the planet are 2.034 ± 0.052 MJup and 1.036 ± 0.019 RJup. Taking into account its level of irradiation, the high density of the planet favors an old age and a massive core. Our deduced orbital eccentricity, 0.0035-0.0025+0.0060, is consistent with a fully circularized orbit. We detect the emission of the planet at 2.09 μm at better than 11-σ, the deduced occultation depth being 1560 ± 140 ppm. Our detection of the occultation at 1.19 μm is marginal (790 ± 320 ppm) and more observations are needed to confirm it. We place a 3-σ upper limit of 850 ppm on the depth of the occultation at ~0.9 μm. Together, these results strongly favor a poor redistribution of the heat to the night-side of the planet, and marginally favor a model with no day-side temperature inversion. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-78b and WASP-79b: Two highly-bloated hot Jupiter-mass exoplanets orbiting F-type stars in Eridanus
Smalley, B; Anderson, D R; Collier-Cameron, A et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 547

We report the discovery of WASP-78b and WASP-79b, two highly-bloated Jupiter-mass exoplanets orbiting F-type host stars. WASP-78b orbits its V=12.0 host star (TYC 5889-271-1) every 2.175 days and WASP-79b ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of WASP-78b and WASP-79b, two highly-bloated Jupiter-mass exoplanets orbiting F-type host stars. WASP-78b orbits its V=12.0 host star (TYC 5889-271-1) every 2.175 days and WASP-79b orbits its V=10.1 host star (CD-30 1812) every 3.662 days. A simultaneous fit to WASP and TRAPPIST transit photometry and CORALIE radial-velocity measurements yields planetary masses of 0.89 +/- 0.08 M_Jup and 0.90 +/- 0.08 M_Jup, and radii of 1.70 +/- 0.11 R_Jup and 2.09 +/- 0.14 R_Jup, for WASP-78b and WASP-79b, respectively. The planetary equilibrium temperature of T_P = 2350 +/- 80 K for WASP-78b makes it one of the hottest of the currently known exoplanets. The radius of WASP-79b suggests that it is potentially the largest known exoplanet. [less ▲]

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See detailThe HARPS search for southern extra-solar planets XXXV. Super-Earths around the M-dwarf neighbors Gl433 and Gl667C
Delfosse, X.; Bonfils, X.; Forveille, T. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 553

Context. M dwarfs have often been found to have super-Earth planets with short orbital periods. These stars are thus preferential targets in searches for rocky or ocean planets in the solar neighborhood ... [more ▼]

Context. M dwarfs have often been found to have super-Earth planets with short orbital periods. These stars are thus preferential targets in searches for rocky or ocean planets in the solar neighborhood. Aims: Our research group recently announced the discovery of one and two low-mass planets around the M1.5V stars Gl 433 and Gl 667C, respectively. We found these planets with the HARPS spectrograph on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla Observatory, from observations obtained during the guaranteed time observing program of that instrument. Methods: We obtained additional HARPS observations of those two stars, for a total of 67 and 179 radial velocity measurements for Gl 433 and Gl 667C, respectively, and present here an orbital analysis of these extended data sets and our main conclusions about both planetary systems. Results: One of the three planets, Gl 667Cc, has a mass of only M2sini ~ 4.25 M⊕ and orbits in the central habitable zone of its host star. It receives only 10% less stellar energy from Gl 667C than the Earth receives from the Sun. However, planet evolution in the habitable zone can be very different if the host star is a M dwarf or a solar-like star, without necessarily questioning the presence of water. The two other planets, Gl 433b and Gl 667Cb, both have M2sini of ~5.5 M⊕ and periods of ~7 days. The radial velocity measurements of both stars contain longer timescale signals, which we fit with longer period Keplerians. For Gl 433, the signal probably originates in a magnetic cycle, while data of longer time span will be needed before conclusive results can be obtained for Gl 667C. The metallicity of Gl 433 is close to solar, while Gl 667C is metal poor with [Fe/H] ~ -0.6. This reinforces the recent conclusion that the occurrence of super-Earth planets does not strongly correlate with the stellar metallicity. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XXII. CoRoT-16b: a hot Jupiter with a hint of eccentricity around a faint solar-like star
Ollivier, M; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Santerne, A et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 541

<BR /> Aims: We report the discovery of CoRoT-16b, a low density hot jupiter that orbits a faint G5V star (mV = 15.63) in 5.3523 ± 0.0002 days with slight eccentricity. A fit of the data with no a priori ... [more ▼]

<BR /> Aims: We report the discovery of CoRoT-16b, a low density hot jupiter that orbits a faint G5V star (mV = 15.63) in 5.3523 ± 0.0002 days with slight eccentricity. A fit of the data with no a priori assumptions on the orbit leads to an eccentricity of 0.33 ± 0.1. We discuss this value and also derive the mass and radius of the planet. <BR /> Methods: We analyse the photometric transit curve of CoRoT-16 given by the CoRoT satellite, and radial velocity data from the HARPS and HIRES spectrometers. A combined analysis using a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm is used to get the system parameters. <BR /> Results: CoRoT-16b is a 0.535 -0.083/+0.085 M[SUB]J[/SUB], 1.17 -0.14/+0.16 R[SUB]J[/SUB] hot Jupiter with a density of 0.44 -0.14/+0.21 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]. Despite its short orbital distance (0.0618 ± 0.0015 AU) and the age of the parent star (6.73 ± 2.8 Gyr), the planet orbit exhibits significantly non-zero eccentricity. This is very uncommon for this type of objects as tidal effects tend to circularise the orbit. This value is discussed taking into account the characteristics of the star and the observation accuracy. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006, has been developed and is operated by the CNES with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brasil, ESA, Germany, and Spain.Observations made with the HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (HARPS programs 083.C-0186 and 184.C-0639) and the HIRES spectrograph at the Keck Observatory (NASA-Keck programs N035Hr, N143Hr and N095Hr). [less ▲]

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