References of "Queloz, D"
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See detailCHEOPS: A transit photometry mission for ESA's small mission programme
Broeg, C.; Fortier, A.; Ehrenreich, D. et al

in Saglia, Roberto (Ed.) European Physical Journal Web of Conferences (2013, April 01)

Ground based radial velocity (RV) searches continue to discover exoplanets below Neptune mass down to Earth mass. Furthermore, ground based transit searches now reach milli-mag photometric precision and ... [more ▼]

Ground based radial velocity (RV) searches continue to discover exoplanets below Neptune mass down to Earth mass. Furthermore, ground based transit searches now reach milli-mag photometric precision and can discover Neptune size planets around bright stars. These searches will find exoplanets around bright stars anywhere on the sky, their discoveries representing prime science targets for further study due to the proximity and brightness of their host stars. A mission for transit follow-up measurements of these prime targets is currently lacking. The first ESA S-class mission CHEOPS (CHaracterizing ExoPlanet Satellite) will fill this gap. It will perform ultra-high precision photometric monitoring of selected bright target stars almost anywhere on the sky with sufficient precision to detect Earth sized transits. It will be able to detect transits of RV-planets by photometric monitoring if the geometric configuration results in a transit. For Hot Neptunes discovered from the ground, CHEOPS will be able to improve the transit light curve so that the radius can be determined precisely. Because of the host stars' brightness, high precision RV measurements will be possible for all targets. All planets observed in transit by CHEOPS will be validated and their masses will be known. This will provide valuable data for constraining the mass-radius relation of exoplanets, especially in the Neptune-mass regime. During the planned 3.5 year mission, about 500 targets will be observed. There will be 20% of open time available for the community to develop new science programmes. [less ▲]

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See detailTRAPPIST-UCDTS: A prototype search for habitable planets transiting ultra-cool stars
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Fumel, A. et al

in Saglia, Roberto (Ed.) European Physical Journal Web of Conferences (2013, April 01)

The ˜1000 nearest ultra-cool stars (spectral type M6 and latter) represent a unique opportunity for the search for life outside solar system. Due to their small luminosity, their habitable zone is 30-100 ... [more ▼]

The ˜1000 nearest ultra-cool stars (spectral type M6 and latter) represent a unique opportunity for the search for life outside solar system. Due to their small luminosity, their habitable zone is 30-100 times closer than for the Sun, the corresponding orbital periods ranging from one to a few days. Thanks to this proximity, the transits of a habitable planet are much more probable and frequent than for an Earth-Sun analog, while their tiny size (˜1 Jupiter radius) leads to transits deep enough for a ground-based detection, even for sub-Earth size planets. Furthermore, a habitable planet transiting one of these nearby ultra-cool star would be amenable for a thorough atmospheric characterization, including the detection of possible biosignatures, notably with the near-to-come JWST. Motivated by these reasons, we have set up the concept of a ground-based survey optimized for detecting planets of Earth-size and below transiting the nearest Southern ultra-cool stars. To assess thoroughly the actual potential of this future survey, we are currently conducting a prototype mini-survey using the TRAPPIST robotic 60cm telescope located at La Silla ESO Observatory (Chile). We summarize here the preliminary results of this mini-survey that fully validate our concept. [less ▲]

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See detailThermal emission at 3.6-8 micron from WASP-19b: a hot Jupiter without a stratosphere orbiting an active star
Anderson, D. R.; Smith, A. M. S.; Madhusudhan, N. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2013), 430(4), 3422-3431

We report detection of thermal emission from the exoplanet WASP-19b at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 μm. We used the InfraRed Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope to observe two occultations of WASP-19b by ... [more ▼]

We report detection of thermal emission from the exoplanet WASP-19b at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 μm. We used the InfraRed Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope to observe two occultations of WASP-19b by its host star. We combine our new detections with previous measurements of WASP-19b's emission at 1.6 and 2.09 μm to construct a spectral energy distribution of the planet's dayside atmosphere. By comparing this with model-atmosphere spectra, we find that the dayside atmosphere of WASP-19b lacks a strong temperature inversion. As WASP-19 is an active star (log R'HK = -4.50 ± 0.03), this finding supports the hypothesis of Knutson, Howard and Isaacson that inversions are suppressed in hot Jupiters orbiting active stars. The available data are unable to differentiate between a carbon-rich and an oxygen-rich atmosphere. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-64b and WASP-72b: two new transiting highly irradiated giant planets
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Anderson, D. R.; Collier-Cameron, A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 552

We report the discovery by the WASP transit survey of two new highly irradiated giant planets. WASP-64 b is slightly more massive (1.271 ± 0.068 MJup) and larger (1.271 ± 0.039 RJup) than Jupiter, and is ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery by the WASP transit survey of two new highly irradiated giant planets. WASP-64 b is slightly more massive (1.271 ± 0.068 MJup) and larger (1.271 ± 0.039 RJup) than Jupiter, and is in very-short (a = 0.02648 ± 0.00024 AU, P = 1.5732918 ± 0.0000015 days) circular orbit around a V = 12.3 G7-type dwarf (1.004 ± 0.028 Msun, 1.058 ± 0.025 Rsun, Teff = 5500 ± 150 K). Its size is typical of hot Jupiters with similar masses. WASP-72 b has also a mass a bit higher than Jupiter's (1.461-0.056+0.059 MJup) and orbits very close (0.03708 ± 0.00050 AU, P = 2.2167421 ± 0.0000081 days) to a bright (V = 9.6) and moderately evolved F7-type star (1.386 ± 0.055 Msun, 1.98 ± 0.24 Rsun, Teff = 6250 ± 100 K). Despite its extreme irradiation (~5.5 × 109 erg s-1 cm-2), WASP-72 b has a moderate size (1.27 ± 0.20 RJup) that could suggest a significant enrichment in heavy elements. Nevertheless, the errors on its physical parameters are still too high to draw any strong inference on its internal structure or its possible peculiarity. [less ▲]

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See detailSearching for water in the atmosphere of the hot Saturn WASP-49b
Delrez, Laetitia ULg; Lendl, M.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

Poster (2013, March 11)

At the forefront of comparative exoplanetology, the atmospheric characterization of transiting exoplanets is revealing the intimate nature of these 'new worlds'. In this exciting context, we present here ... [more ▼]

At the forefront of comparative exoplanetology, the atmospheric characterization of transiting exoplanets is revealing the intimate nature of these 'new worlds'. In this exciting context, we present here some preliminary results of our VLT program that consisted in monitoring three transits of the new 'hot Saturn' WASP-49b (Lendl et al. 2012) with the FORS instrument in Multi-Object Spectroscopic mode (MXU). [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-54b, WASP-56b and WASP-57b: Three new sub-Jupiter mass planets from SuperWASP
Faedi, F.; Pollacco, D.; Barros, S. C. C. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 551

We present three newly discovered sub-Jupiter mass planets from the SuperWASP survey: WASP-54b is a heavily bloated planet of mass 0.636+0.025-0.024RJ. It orbits a F9 star, evolving off the main sequence ... [more ▼]

We present three newly discovered sub-Jupiter mass planets from the SuperWASP survey: WASP-54b is a heavily bloated planet of mass 0.636+0.025-0.024RJ. It orbits a F9 star, evolving off the main sequence, every 3.69 days. Our MCMC fit of the system yields a slightly eccentric orbit (e = 0.067+0.033-0.025) for WASP-54b. We investigated further the veracity of our detection of the eccentric orbit for WASP-54b, and we find that it could be real. However, given the brightness of WASP-54 V = 10.42 mag, we encourage observations of a secondary eclipse to draw robust conclusions on both the orbital eccentricity and the thermal structure of the planet. WASP-56b and WASP-57b have masses of 0.571+0.034-0.035MJ and 0.672+0.049-0.046MJ, respectively; and radii of 1.092+0.035-0.033RJ for WASP-56b and 0.916+0.017-0.014RJ for WASP-57b. They orbit main sequence stars of spectral type G6 every 4.67 and 2.84 days, respectively. WASP-56b and WASP-57b show no radius anomaly and a high density possibly implying a large core of heavy elements; possibly as high as ~50 M⊕ in the case of WASP-57b. However,the composition of the deep interior of exoplanets remains still undetermined. Thus, more exoplanet discoveries such as the ones presented in this paper, are needed to understand and constrain giant planets' physical properties. [less ▲]

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See detailThe CORALIE survey for southern extrasolar planets XVII. New and updated long period and massive planets
Marmier, M.; Ségransan, D.; Udry, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 551

Context. Since 1998, a planet-search program around main sequence stars within 50 pc in the southern hemisphere has been carried out with the CORALIE echelle spectrograph at La Silla Observatory. Aims ... [more ▼]

Context. Since 1998, a planet-search program around main sequence stars within 50 pc in the southern hemisphere has been carried out with the CORALIE echelle spectrograph at La Silla Observatory. Aims: With an observing time span of more than 14 years, the CORALIE survey is now able to unveil Jovian planets on Jupiter's period domain. This growing period-interval coverage is important for building formation and migration models since observational constraints are still weak for periods beyond the ice line. Methods: Long-term precise Doppler measurements with the CORALIE echelle spectrograph, together with a few additional observations made with the HARPS spectrograph on the ESO 3.6 m telescope, reveal radial velocity signatures of massive planetary companions on long-period orbits. Results: In this paper we present seven new planets orbiting HD 27631, HD 98649, HD 106515A, HD 166724, HD 196067, HD 219077, and HD 220689, together with the CORALIE orbital parameters for three already known planets around HD 10647, HD 30562, and HD 86226. The period range of the new planetary companions goes from 2200 to 5500 days and covers a mass domain between 1 and 10.5 MJup. Surprisingly, five of them present very high eccentricities above e > 0.57. A pumping scenario by Kozai mechanism may be invoked for HD 106515Ab and HD 196067b, which are both orbiting stars in multiple systems. Since the presence of a third massive body cannot be inferred from the data of HD 98649b, HD 166724b, and HD 219077b, the origin of the eccentricity of these systems remains unknown. Except for HD 10647b, no constraint on the upper mass of the planets is provided by Hipparcos astrometric data. Finally, the hosts of these long period planets show no metallicity excess. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-80b: a gas giant transiting a cool dwarf
Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 551

We report the discovery of a planet transiting the star <ASTROBJ>WASP-80</ASTROBJ> (<ASTROBJ>1SWASP J201240.26-020838.2</ASTROBJ>; <ASTROBJ>2MASS J20124017-0208391</ASTROBJ>; <ASTROBJ>TYC 5165-481-1 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a planet transiting the star <ASTROBJ>WASP-80</ASTROBJ> (<ASTROBJ>1SWASP J201240.26-020838.2</ASTROBJ>; <ASTROBJ>2MASS J20124017-0208391</ASTROBJ>; <ASTROBJ>TYC 5165-481-1</ASTROBJ>; <ASTROBJ>BPM 80815</ASTROBJ>; V = 11.9, K = 8.4). Our analysis shows this is a 0.55 ± 0.04 M[SUB]jup[/SUB], 0.95 ± 0.03 R[SUB]jup[/SUB] gas giant on a circular 3.07 day orbit around a star with a spectral type between K7V and M0V. This system produces one of the largest transit depths so far reported, making it a worthwhile target for transmission spectroscopy. We find a large discrepancy between the vsini[SUB]⋆[/SUB] inferred from stellar line broadening and the observed amplitude of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. This can be understood either by an orbital plane nearly perpendicular to the stellar spin or by an additional, unaccounted for source of broadening. Using WASP-South photometric observations, from Sutherland (South Africa), confirmed with the 60 cm TRAPPIST robotic telescope, EulerCam, and the CORALIE spectrograph on the Swiss 1.2 m Euler Telescope, and HARPS on the ESO 3.6 m (Prog ID 089.C-0151), all three located at La Silla Observatory, Chile.Radial velocity and photometric data are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr">cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr</A>(<A href="http://130.79.128.5">130.79.128.5</A>) or via <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/551/A80">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/551/A80</A> [less ▲]

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See detailAccurate spectroscopic parameters of WASP planet host stars
Doyle, Amanda P.; Smalley, B.; Maxted, P. F. L. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2013), 428(4), 3164-3172

We have made a detailed spectral analysis of eleven Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) planet host stars using high signal-to-noise (S/N) HARPS spectra. Our line list was carefully selected from the ... [more ▼]

We have made a detailed spectral analysis of eleven Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) planet host stars using high signal-to-noise (S/N) HARPS spectra. Our line list was carefully selected from the spectra of the Sun and Procyon, and we made a critical evaluation of the atomic data. The spectral lines were measured using equivalent widths. The procedures were tested on the Sun and Procyon prior to be being used on the WASP stars. The effective temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity and metallicity were determined for all the stars. We show that abundances derived from high S/N spectra are likely to be higher than those obtained from low S/N spectra, as noise can cause the equivalent width to be underestimated. We also show that there is a limit to the accuracy of stellar parameters that can be achieved, despite using high S/N spectra, and the average uncertainty in effective temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity and metallicity is 83 K, 0.11 dex, 0.11 km/s and 0.10 dex respectively. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-77 Ab: A Transiting Hot Jupiter Planet in a Wide Binary System
Maxted, P. F. L.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A. et al

in Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (2013), 125

We report the discovery of a transiting planet with an orbital period of 1.36 days orbiting the brighter component of the visual binary star BD 07 436. The host star, WASP-77 A, is a moderately bright G8 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a transiting planet with an orbital period of 1.36 days orbiting the brighter component of the visual binary star BD 07 436. The host star, WASP-77 A, is a moderately bright G8 V star (V=10.3) with a metallicity close to solar ([Fe/H] = 0.0 ± 0.1). The companion star, WASP-77 B, is a K-dwarf approximately 2 mag fainter at a separation of approximately 3″. The spectrum of WASP-77 A shows emission in the cores of the Caii H and K lines, indicative of moderate chromospheric activity. The Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) light curves show photometric variability with a period of 15.3 days and an amplitude of about 0.3% that is probably due to the magnetic activity of the host star. We use an analysis of the combined photometric and spectroscopic data to derive the mass and radius of the planet (1.76 ± 0.06 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB], 1.21 ± 0.02 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]). The age of WASP-77 A estimated from its rotation rate (˜1 Gyr) agrees with the age estimated in a similar way for WASP-77 B (˜0.6 Gyr) but is in poor agreement with the age inferred by comparing its effective temperature and density to stellar models (˜8 Gyr). Follow-up observations of WASP-77 Ab will make a useful contribution to our understanding of the influence of binarity and host star activity on the properties of hot Jupiters. [less ▲]

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See detailThe HARPS search for southern extra-solar planets: XXXI. The M-dwarf sample
Bonfils, X.; Delfosse, X.; Udry, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 549

(Abridged) Searching for planets around stars with different masses probes the outcome of planetary formation for different initial conditions. This drives observations of a sample of 102 southern nearby ... [more ▼]

(Abridged) Searching for planets around stars with different masses probes the outcome of planetary formation for different initial conditions. This drives observations of a sample of 102 southern nearby M dwarfs, using a fraction of our guaranteed time on the ESO/HARPS spectrograph (Feb. 11th, 2003 to Apr. 1st 2009). This paper makes available the sample's time series, presents their precision and variability. We apply systematic searches and diagnostics to discriminate whether the observed Doppler shifts are caused by stellar surface inhomogeneities or by the radial pull of orbiting planets. We recover the planetary signals corresponding to 9 planets already announced by our group (Gl176b, Gl581b, c, d & e, Gl674b, Gl433b, Gl 667Cb and c). We present radial velocities that confirm GJ 849 hosts a Jupiter-mass planet, plus a long-term radial-velocity variation. We also present RVs that precise the planetary mass and period of Gl 832b. We detect long-term RV changes for Gl 367, Gl 680 and Gl 880 betraying yet unknown long-period companions. We identify candidate signals in the radial-velocity time series and demonstrate they are most probably caused by stellar surface inhomogeneities. Finally, we derive a first estimate of the occurrence of M-dwarf planets as a function of their minimum mass and orbital period. In particular, we find that giant planets (m sin i = 100-1,000 Mearth) have a low frequency (e.g. f<1% for P=1-10 d and f=0.02^{+0.03}_{-0.01} for P=10-100 d), whereas super-Earths (m sin i = 1-10 Mearth) are likely very abundant (f=0.36^{+0.25}_{-0.10} for P=1-10 d and f=0.35^{+0.45}_{-0.11} for P=10-100 d). We also obtained eta_earth=0.41^{+0.54}_{-0.13}, the frequency of habitable planets orbiting M dwarfs (1<m sin i<10 Mearth). For the first time, eta_earth is a direct measure and not a number extrapolated from the statistic of more massive and/or shorter-period planets. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards a Transmission Spectrum of the Hot Saturn WASP-49b
Lendl, Monika ULg; Delrez, Laetitia ULg; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

Poster (2013)

Transiting extrasolar planets are so far the only planets for which atmospheres can be studied in detail. The spectro-photometric observation of transits allows to search for wavelength dependencies in ... [more ▼]

Transiting extrasolar planets are so far the only planets for which atmospheres can be studied in detail. The spectro-photometric observation of transits allows to search for wavelength dependencies in the effective planetary radius that are sensitive to signatures of chemical elements in the planetary atmosphere. We present first results from an observing campaign carried out using the FORS2 instrument to obtain spectro-photometric observations of transits of the low-density hot Saturn WASP-49b. [less ▲]

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See detailStudying the Atmospheres of the Most Intriguing WASP Hot Jupiters
Lendl, Monika ULg; Delrez, Laetitia ULg; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

Conference (2013)

Among the over 300 transiting planets confirmed to date, approximately 130 have been found by groundbased wide angle transit surveys such asWASP. While these surveys are not sensitive enough to detect ... [more ▼]

Among the over 300 transiting planets confirmed to date, approximately 130 have been found by groundbased wide angle transit surveys such asWASP. While these surveys are not sensitive enough to detect lowmass planets, they excel at picking out rare hot- Jupiters orbiting reasonably bright stars (V mag = 9 - 11) across the sky. These planets occupy a favorable region in parameter space, as they show frequent and deep transits. Due to the proximity to their host stars these gas giants possess hot extended atmospheres making them ideal targets for the study of their atmospheres via transmission and occultation spectrophotometry. During occultation, the flux emerging from the planetary dayside is eliminated. By comparing the flux in- and out-of occultation, the planet-to-star brightness ratio can be measured. Observations in different passbands yield a measure of the planetary spectral energy distribution and thereby allow to determine the atmospheric temperature structure, heat redistribution efficiency, albedo, and to place constraints on the atmospheric composition. From the spectro-photometric observation of transits, we can measure wavelength dependencies in the effective planetary radius that are sensitive to signatures of chemical elements in the planetary atmosphere. We present results of ongoing observing campaigns employing these methods to study the atmospheres of hot Jupiters discovered by the WASP survey. In particular we show results for the very short-period planet WASP-19b based on data from the 1m-class Euler-Swiss and TRAPPIST telescopes, as well as a transmission spectrum of the low-density hot Saturn WASP-49b obtained from FORS2 at the VLT/UT1. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission XXI. CoRoT-19b: A low density planet orbiting an old inactive F9V-star
Guenther, E. W.; Diaz, R. F.; Gazzano, J-C et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 537

Observations of transiting extrasolar planets are of key importance to our understanding of planets because their mass, radius, and mass density can be determined. The CoRoT space mission allows us to ... [more ▼]

Observations of transiting extrasolar planets are of key importance to our understanding of planets because their mass, radius, and mass density can be determined. The CoRoT space mission allows us to achieve a very high photometric accuracy. By combining CoRoT data with high-precision radial velocity measurements, we derive precise planetary radii and masses. We report the discovery of CoRoT-19b, a gas-giant planet transiting an old, inactive F9V-type star with a period of four days. After excluding alternative physical configurations mimicking a planetary transit signal, we determine the radius and mass of the planet by combining CoRoT photometry with high-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the echelle spectrographs SOPHIE, HARPS, FIES, and SANDIFORD. To improve the precision of its ephemeris and the epoch, we observed additional transits with the TRAPPIST and Euler telescopes. Using HARPS spectra obtained during the transit, we then determine the projected angle between the spin of the star and the orbit of the planet. We find that the host star of CoRoT-19b is an inactive F9V-type star close to the end of its main-sequence life. The host star has a mass M*=1.21+/-0.05 Msun and radius R*=1.65+/-0.04 Rsun. The planet has a mass of Mp=1.11+/-0.06 Mjup and radius of Rp=1.29+/-0.03 Rjup. The resulting bulk density is only rho=0.71+/-0.06 gcm-3, which is much lower than that for Jupiter. The exoplanet CoRoT-19b is an example of a giant planet of almost the same mass as Jupiter but a 30% larger radius. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalysis of Spin-Orbit Alignment in the WASP-32, WASP-38, and HAT-P-27/WASP-40 Systems
Brown, D. J. A.; Collier Cameron, A.; Díaz, R. F. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2012), 760

We present measurements of the spin-orbit alignment angle, λ, for the hot Jupiter systems WASP-32, WASP-38, and HAT-P-27/WASP-40, based on data obtained using the HARPS spectrograph. We analyze the ... [more ▼]

We present measurements of the spin-orbit alignment angle, λ, for the hot Jupiter systems WASP-32, WASP-38, and HAT-P-27/WASP-40, based on data obtained using the HARPS spectrograph. We analyze the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for all three systems and also carry out Doppler tomography for WASP-32 and WASP-38. We find that WASP-32 (T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 6140[SUP]+90[/SUP] [SUB]- 100[/SUB] K) is aligned, with an alignment angle of λ = 10fdg5[SUP] + 6.4[/SUP] [SUB] - 6.5[/SUB] obtained through tomography, and that WASP-38 (T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 6180[SUP]+40[/SUP] [SUB]- 60[/SUB] K) is also aligned, with tomographic analysis yielding λ = 7fdg5[SUP] + 4.7[/SUP] [SUB] - 6.1[/SUB]. The latter result provides an order-of-magnitude improvement in the uncertainty in λ compared to the previous analysis of Simpson et al. We are only able to loosely constrain the angle for HAT-P-27/WASP-40 (T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5190[SUP]+160[/SUP] [SUB]- 170[/SUB] K) to λ = 24fdg2[SUP] + 76.0[/SUP] [SUB] - 44.5[/SUB], owing to the poor signal-to-noise ratio of our data. We consider this result a non-detection under a slightly updated version of the alignment test of Brown et al. We place our results in the context of the full sample of spin-orbit alignment measurements, finding that they provide further support for previously established trends. Based on observations (under proposal 087.C-0649) made using the HARPS High Resolution Échelle Spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6 m at the ESO La Silla observatory. [less ▲]

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See detailA hot Uranus transiting the nearby M dwarf GJ 3470. Detected with HARPS velocimetry. Captured in transit with TRAPPIST photometry
Bonfils, X.; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Udry, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 546

We report on the discovery of GJ 3470 b, a transiting hot Uranus of mass m[SUB]p[/SUB] = 14.0 ± 1.8 M[SUB]⊕[/SUB], radius R[SUB]p[/SUB] = 4.2 ± 0.6 R[SUB]⊕[/SUB] and period P = 3.3371 ± 0.0002 day. Its ... [more ▼]

We report on the discovery of GJ 3470 b, a transiting hot Uranus of mass m[SUB]p[/SUB] = 14.0 ± 1.8 M[SUB]⊕[/SUB], radius R[SUB]p[/SUB] = 4.2 ± 0.6 R[SUB]⊕[/SUB] and period P = 3.3371 ± 0.0002 day. Its host star is a nearby (d = 25.2 ± 2.9 pc) M1.5 dwarf of mass M[SUB]⋆[/SUB] = 0.54 ± 0.07 M[SUB]&sun;[/SUB] and radius R[SUB]⋆[/SUB] = 0.50 ± 0.06 R[SUB]&sun;[/SUB]. The detection was made during a radial-velocity campaign with Harps that focused on the search for short-period planets orbiting M dwarfs. Once the planet was discovered and the transit-search window narrowed to about 10% of an orbital period, a photometric search started with Trappist and quickly detected the ingress of the planet. Additional observations with Trappist, EulerCam and Nites definitely confirmed the transiting nature of GJ 3470b and allowed the determination of its true mass and radius. The star's visible or infrared brightness (V[SUP]mag[/SUP] = 12.3, K[SUP]mag[/SUP] = 8.0), together with a large eclipse depth D = 0.57 ± 0.05%, ranks GJ 3470 b among the most suitable planets for follow-up characterizations. Based on observations made with the HARPS instrument on the ESO 3.6 m telescope under the program IDs 183.C-0437 at Cerro La Silla (Chile).Our radial-velocity and photometric time series are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/546/A27">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/546/A27</A> [less ▲]

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See detailSeven transiting hot-Jupiters from WASP-South, Euler and TRAPPIST: WASP-47b, WASP-55b, WASP-61b, WASP-62b, WASP-63b, WASP-66b & WASP-67b
Hellier, Coel; Anderson, D R; Collier Cameron, A et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2012), 426

We present seven new transiting hot Jupiters from the WASP-South survey. The planets are all typical hot Jupiters orbiting stars from F4 to K0 with magnitudes of V = 10.3 to 12.5. The orbital periods are ... [more ▼]

We present seven new transiting hot Jupiters from the WASP-South survey. The planets are all typical hot Jupiters orbiting stars from F4 to K0 with magnitudes of V = 10.3 to 12.5. The orbital periods are all in the range 3.9--4.6 d, the planetary masses range from 0.4--2.3 Mjup and the radii from 1.1--1.4 Mjup. In line with known hot Jupiters, the planetary densities range from Jupiter-like to inflated (rho = 0.13--1.07 rho_jup). We use the increasing numbers of known hot Jupiters to investigate the distribution of their orbital periods and the 3--4-d "pile-up". [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in the CoRoT LRa01 field
Carone, L.; Gandolfi, D.; Cabrera, J. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 538

Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission whose primary goals are stellar seismology and extrasolar planets search. Its surveys of large stellar fields generate numerous planetary candidates whose ... [more ▼]

Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission whose primary goals are stellar seismology and extrasolar planets search. Its surveys of large stellar fields generate numerous planetary candidates whose lightcurves have transit-like features. An extensive analytical and observational follow-up effort is undertaken to classify these candidates. Aims: The list of planetary transit candidates from the CoRoT LRa01 star field in the Monoceros constellation towards the Galactic anti-center is presented. The CoRoT observations of LRa01 lasted from 24 October 2007 to 3 March 2008. Methods: 7470 chromatic and 3938 monochromatic lightcurves were acquired and analysed. Instrumental noise and stellar variability were treated with several filtering tools by different teams from the CoRoT community. Different transit search algorithms were applied to the lightcurves. Results: Fifty-one stars were classified as planetary transit candidates in LRa01. Thirty-seven (i.e., 73 % of all candidates) are "good" planetary candidates based on photometric analysis only. Thirty-two (i.e., 87 % of the "good" candidates) have been followed-up. At the time of this writing twenty-two cases have been solved and five planets have been discovered: three transiting hot-Jupiters (CoRoT-5b, CoRoT-12b, and CoRoT-21b), the first terrestrial transiting planet (CoRoT-7b), and another planet in the same system (CoRoT-7c, detected by radial velocity survey only). Evidences of another non-transiting planet in the CoRoT-7 system, namely CoRoT-7d, have been recently found. [less ▲]

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See detailImproved precision on the radius of the nearby super-Earth 55 Cnc e
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Demory, B.-O.; Benneke, B. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 539

We report on new transit photometry for the super-Earth 55 Cnc e obtained with Warm Spitzer/IRAC at 4.5 microns. An individual analysis of these new data leads to a planet radius of 2.21-0.16+0.15 Rearth ... [more ▼]

We report on new transit photometry for the super-Earth 55 Cnc e obtained with Warm Spitzer/IRAC at 4.5 microns. An individual analysis of these new data leads to a planet radius of 2.21-0.16+0.15 Rearth, in good agreement with the values previously derived from the MOST and Spitzer transit discovery data. A global analysis of both Spitzer transit time-series improves the precision on the radius of the planet at 4.5 microns to 2.20+-0.12 Rearth. We also performed an independent analysis of the MOST data, paying particular attention to the influence of the systematic effects of instrumental origin on the derived parameters and errors by including them in a global model instead of performing a preliminary detrending-filtering processing. We deduce from this reanalysis of MOST data an optical planet radius of 2.04+-0.15 Rearth that is consistent with our Spitzer infrared radius. Assuming the achromaticity of the transit depth, we performed a global analysis combining Spitzer and MOST data that results in a planet radius of 2.17+-0.10 Rearth (13,820+-620 km). These results confirm that the most probable composition of 55 Cnc e is an envelope of supercritical water above a rocky nucleus. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-36b: A new transiting planet around a metal-poor G-dwarf, and an analysis of correlated noise in transit light curves
Smith, A. M. S.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A. et al

in Astronomical Journal (The) (2012), 143(4), 10

We report the discovery, from WASP and CORALIE, of a transiting exoplanet in a 1.54-d orbit. The host star, WASP-36, is a magnitude 12.7, metal-poor G2 dwarf (Teff = 5881 +/- 137 K), with [Fe/H] = -0.31 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery, from WASP and CORALIE, of a transiting exoplanet in a 1.54-d orbit. The host star, WASP-36, is a magnitude 12.7, metal-poor G2 dwarf (Teff = 5881 +/- 137 K), with [Fe/H] = -0.31 +/- 0.12. We determine the planet to have mass and radius respectively 2.27 +/- 0.07 and 1.27 +/- 0.03 times that of Jupiter. We have eight partial or complete transit light curves, from four different observatories, which allows us to investigate the extent to which red noise in follow-up light curves affects the fitted system parameters. We find that the solutions obtained by analysing each of these light curves independently are consistent with our global fit to all the data, despite the apparent presence of correlated noise in at least two of the light curves. [less ▲]

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