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See detailNoise properties of the CoRoT data. A planet-finding perspective
Aigrain, S.; Pont, F.; Fressin, F. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

In this short paper, we study the photometric precision of stellar light curves obtained by the CoRoT satellite in its planet-finding channel, with a particular emphasis on the time scales characteristic ... [more ▼]

In this short paper, we study the photometric precision of stellar light curves obtained by the CoRoT satellite in its planet-finding channel, with a particular emphasis on the time scales characteristic of planetary transits. Together with other articles in the same issue of this journal, it forms an attempt to provide the building blocks for a statistical interpretation of the CoRoT planet and eclipsing binary catch to date. After pre-processing the light curves so as to minimise long-term variations and outliers, we measure the scatter of the light curves in the first three CoRoT runs lasting more than 1 month, using an iterative non-linear filter to isolate signal on the time scales of interest. The behaviour of the noise on 2 h time scales is described well by a power-law with index 0.25 in R-magnitude, ranging from 0.1 mmag at R=11.5 to 1 mmag at R=16, which is close to the pre-launch specification, though still a factor 2-3 above the photon noise due to residual jitter noise and hot pixel events. There is evidence of slight degradation in the performance over time. We find clear evidence of enhanced variability on hour time scales (at the level of 0.5 mmag) in stars identified as likely giants from their R magnitude and B-V colour, which represent approximately 60 and 20% of the observed population in the directions of Aquila and Monoceros, respectively. On the other hand, median correlated noise levels over 2 h for dwarf stars are extremely low, reaching 0.05 mmag at the bright end. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006, has been developed and is operated by the CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany, and Spain. CoRoT data become publicly available one year after release to the Co-Is of the mission from the CoRoT archive: http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr/. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in CoRoT-LRc01 field
Cabrera, J.; Fridlund, M.; Ollivier, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

Aims: We present here the list of planetary transit candidates detected in the first long run observed by CoRoT: LRc01, towards the galactic center in the direction of Aquila, which lasted from May to ... [more ▼]

Aims: We present here the list of planetary transit candidates detected in the first long run observed by CoRoT: LRc01, towards the galactic center in the direction of Aquila, which lasted from May to October 2007. <BR />Methods: we analyzed 3719 (33%) sources in the chromatic bands and 7689 in the monochromatic band. Instrumental noise and the stellar variability were treated with several detrending tools, on which subsequently several transit search algorithms were applied. <BR />Results: Forty two sources were classified as planetary transit candidates and up to now 26 cases have been solved. One planet (CoRoT-2b) and one brown-dwarf (CoRoT-3b) have been the subjects of detailed publications. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27 2006, was developed and is operated by CNES, with contributions from Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany and Spain. The first CoRoT data are available to the community from the CoRoT archive: http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. VII. The ``hot-Jupiter''-type planet CoRoT-5b
Rauer, H.; Queloz, D.; Csizmadia, Szilard et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

Aims: The CoRoT space mission continues to photometrically monitor about 12 000 stars in its field-of-view for a series of target fields to search for transiting extrasolar planets ever since 2007. Deep ... [more ▼]

Aims: The CoRoT space mission continues to photometrically monitor about 12 000 stars in its field-of-view for a series of target fields to search for transiting extrasolar planets ever since 2007. Deep transit signals can be detected quickly in the â alarm-modeâ in parallel to the ongoing target field monitoring. CoRoT's first planets have been detected in this mode. <BR />Methods: The CoRoT raw lightcurves are filtered for orbital residuals, outliers, and low-frequency stellar signals. The phase folded lightcurve is used to fit the transit signal and derive the main planetary parameters. Radial velocity follow-up observations were initiated to secure the detection and to derive the planet mass. <BR />Results: We report the detection of CoRoT-5b, detected during observations of the LRa01 field, the first long-duration field in the galactic anti-center direction. CoRoT-5b is a â hot Jupiter-typeâ planet with a radius of 1.388[SUP]+0.046[/SUP][SUB]-0.047[/SUB] R_Jup, a mass of 0.467[SUP]+0.047[/SUP][SUB]-0.024[/SUB] M_Jup, and therefore, a mean density of 0.217[SUP]+0.031[/SUP][SUB]-0.025[/SUB] g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]. The planet orbits an F9V star of 14.0 mag in 4.0378962 ± 0.0000019 days at an orbital distance of 0.04947[SUP]+0.00026[/SUP][SUB]-0.00029[/SUB] AU. Observations made with SOPHIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute Provence (07B.PNP.MOUT), France, and HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (072.C-0488(E), 082.C-0312(A)), and partly based on observations made at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006, was developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brasil, ESA, Germany, and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailThe CoRoT-7 planetary system: two orbiting super-Earths
Queloz, D.; Bouchy, F.; Moutou, C. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

We report on an intensive observational campaign carried out with HARPS at the 3.6 m telescope at La Silla on the star CoRoT-7. Additional simultaneous photometric measurements carried out with the Euler ... [more ▼]

We report on an intensive observational campaign carried out with HARPS at the 3.6 m telescope at La Silla on the star CoRoT-7. Additional simultaneous photometric measurements carried out with the Euler Swiss telescope have demonstrated that the observed radial velocity variations are dominated by rotational modulation from cool spots on the stellar surface. Several approaches were used to extract the radial velocity signal of the planet(s) from the stellar activity signal. First, a simple pre-whitening procedure was employed to find and subsequently remove periodic signals from the complex frequency structure of the radial velocity data. The dominant frequency in the power spectrum was found at 23 days, which corresponds to the rotation period of CoRoT-7. The 0.8535 day period of CoRoT-7b planetary candidate was detected with an amplitude of 3.3 m s[SUP]-1[/SUP]. Most other frequencies, some with amplitudes larger than the CoRoT-7b signal, are most likely associated with activity. A second approach used harmonic decomposition of the rotational period and up to the first three harmonics to filter out the activity signal from radial velocity variations caused by orbiting planets. After correcting the radial velocity data for activity, two periodic signals are detected: the CoRoT-7b transit period and a second one with a period of 3.69 days and an amplitude of 4 m s[SUP]-1[/SUP]. This second signal was also found in the pre-whitening analysis. We attribute the second signal to a second, more remote planet CoRoT-7c . The orbital solution of both planets is compatible with circular orbits. The mass of CoRoT-7b is 4.8±0.8 (M[SUB]â [/SUB]) and that of CoRoT-7c is 8.4± 0.9 (M[SUB]â [/SUB]), assuming both planets are on coplanar orbits. We also investigated the false positive scenario of a blend by a faint stellar binary, and this may be rejected by the stability of the bisector on a nightly scale. According to their masses both planets belong to the super-Earth planet category. The average density of CoRoT-7b is Ï =5.6± 1.3 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP], similar to the Earth. The CoRoT-7 planetary system provides us with the first insight into the physical nature of short period super-Earth planets recently detected by radial velocity surveys. These planets may be denser than Neptune and therefore likely made of rocks like the Earth, or a mix of water ice and rocks. Based on observations made with HARPS spectrograph on the 3.6-m ESO telescope and the EULER Swiss telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile. The HARPS results presented in this paper (Appendix A) are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org and at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/506/303 [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in the CoRoT initial run: resolving their nature
Moutou, C.; Pont, F.; Bouchy, F. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

With the release of CoRoT lightcurves of the Initial Run IRa01, 50 transiting planetary candidates have been published in a companion paper. About twenty of them were identified as binary stars from the ... [more ▼]

With the release of CoRoT lightcurves of the Initial Run IRa01, 50 transiting planetary candidates have been published in a companion paper. About twenty of them were identified as binary stars from the CoRoT lightcurve itself. Complementary observations were conducted for 29 candidates, including ground-based photometry and radial-velocity measurements. Two giant planets were identified and fully characterized. Nineteen binaries are recognized, from which 10 are background eclipsing binaries in the CoRoT mask or triple systems, diluted by the main CoRoT target. Eight cases remain of unclear origin, one of them still being a planetary candidate. Comparison with simulations shows that the actual threshold of confirmed planet detection in this field does not yet fulfill the expectations, and a number of reasons are invoked, like the ranking process based on lightcurve analyses, and the strategy and limits of follow-up observations for targets fainter than magnitude 15. Based on data obtained at Observatoire de Haute Provence with SOPHIE and with HARPS on the ESO 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil , ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. Tables 2 to 13, 15 to 17 and Figs. 4 to 7 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org [less ▲]

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See detailRate and nature of false positives in the CoRoT exoplanet search
Almenara, J. M.; Deeg, H. J.; Aigrain, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

Context: The CoRoT satellite searches for planets by applying the transit method, monitoring up to 12 000 stars in the galactic plane for 150 days in each observing run. This search is contaminated by a ... [more ▼]

Context: The CoRoT satellite searches for planets by applying the transit method, monitoring up to 12 000 stars in the galactic plane for 150 days in each observing run. This search is contaminated by a large fraction of false positives, caused by different eclipsing binary configurations that might be confused with a transiting planet. <BR />Aims: We evaluate the rates and nature of false positives in the CoRoT exoplanets search and compare our results with semiempirical predictions. <BR />Methods: We consider the detected binary and planet candidates in the first three extended CoRoT runs, and classify the results of the follow-up observations completed to verify their planetary nature. We group the follow-up results into undiluted binaries, diluted binaries, and planets and compare their abundances with predictions from the literature. <BR />Results: 83% of the initial detections are classified as false positives using only the CoRoT light-curves, the remaining 17% require follow-up observations. Finally, 12% of the candidates in the follow-up program are planets. The shape of the overall distribution of the false positive rate follows previous predictions, except for candidates with transit depths below about 0.4%. For candidates with transit depths in the range from 0.1-0.4%, CoRoT detections are nearly complete, and this difference from predictions is probably real and dominated by a lower than expected abundance of diluted eclipsing binaries. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil , ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailThe secondary eclipse of CoRoT-1b
Alonso, R.; Alapini, A.; Aigrain, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

The transiting planet CoRoT-1b is thought to belong to the pM-class of planets, in which the thermal emission dominates in the optical wavelengths. We present a detection of its secondary eclipse in the ... [more ▼]

The transiting planet CoRoT-1b is thought to belong to the pM-class of planets, in which the thermal emission dominates in the optical wavelengths. We present a detection of its secondary eclipse in the CoRoT white channel data, whose response function goes from ~400 to ~1000 nm. We used two different filtering approaches, and several methods to evaluate the significance of a detection of the secondary eclipse. We detect a secondary eclipse centered within 20 min at the expected times for a circular orbit, with a depth of 0.016 ± 0.006%. The center of the eclipse is translated in a 1-Ï upper limit to the planet's eccentricity of e cosÏ < 0.014. Under the assumption of a zero Bond Albedo and blackbody emission from the planet, it corresponds to a T_CoRoT = 2330[SUP]+120[/SUP][SUB]-140[/SUB] K. We provide the equilibrium temperatures of the planet as a function of the amount of reflected light. If the planet is in thermal equilibrium with the incident flux from the star, our results imply an inefficient transport mechanism of the flux from the day to the night sides. Based on observations obtained with CoRoT, a space project operated by the French Space Agency, CNES, with participation of the Science Programme of ESA, ESTEC/RSSD, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailRemoving systematics from the CoRoT light curves. I. Magnitude-dependent zero point
Mazeh, T.; Guterman, P.; Aigrain, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

This paper presents an analysis that searched for systematic effects within the CoRoT exoplanet field light curves. The analysis identified a systematic effect that modified the zero point of most CoRoT ... [more ▼]

This paper presents an analysis that searched for systematic effects within the CoRoT exoplanet field light curves. The analysis identified a systematic effect that modified the zero point of most CoRoT exposures as a function of stellar magnitude. We could find this effect only after preparing a set of learning light curves that were relatively free of stellar and instrumental noise. Correcting for this effect, rejecting outliers that appear in almost every exposure, and applying SysRem, reduced the stellar RMS by about 20%, without attenuating transit signals. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany, and Spain. CoRoT data become publicly available one year after release to the Co-Is of the mission from the CoRoT archive: http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr/. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-16b: A New Jupiter-Like Planet Transiting a Southern Solar Analog
Lister, T. A.; Anderson, D. R.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2009), 703

We report the discovery from WASP-South of a new Jupiter-like extrasolar planet, WASP-16b, which transits its solar analog host star every 3.12 days. Analysis of the transit photometry and radial velocity ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery from WASP-South of a new Jupiter-like extrasolar planet, WASP-16b, which transits its solar analog host star every 3.12 days. Analysis of the transit photometry and radial velocity spectroscopic data leads to a planet with R [SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.008 ± 0.071 R [SUB]Jup[/SUB] and M [SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.855 ± 0.059 M [SUB]Jup[/SUB], orbiting a host star with R [SUB]*[/SUB] = 0.946 ± 0.054 R [SUB]sun[/SUB] and M [SUB]*[/SUB] = 1.022 ± 0.101 M [SUB]sun[/SUB]. Comparison of the high resolution stellar spectrum with synthetic spectra and stellar evolution models indicates the host star is a near-solar metallicity ([Fe/H] =0.01 ± 0.10) solar analog (T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5700 ± 150 K and log g = 4.5 ± 0.2) of intermediate age (tau = 2.3[SUP]+5.8[/SUP] [SUB]--2.2[/SUB] Gyr). [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission VIII. CoRoT-7b: the first Super-Earth with measured radius
Leger, A.; Rouan, D.; Schneider, J. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

We report the discovery of very shallow (DF/F = 3.4 10-4), periodic dips in the light curve of an active V = 11.7 G9V star observed by the CoRoT satellite, which we interpret as due to the presence of a ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of very shallow (DF/F = 3.4 10-4), periodic dips in the light curve of an active V = 11.7 G9V star observed by the CoRoT satellite, which we interpret as due to the presence of a transiting companion. We describe the 3-colour CoRoT data and complementary ground-based observations that support the planetary nature of the companion. Methods. We use CoRoT color information, good angular resolution ground-based photometric observations in- and out- of transit, adaptive optics imaging, near-infrared spectroscopy and preliminary results from Radial Velocity measurements, to test the diluted eclipsing binary scenarios. The parameters of the host star are derived from optical spectra, which were then combined with the CoRoT light curve to derive parameters of the companion. We examine carefully all conceivable cases of false positives, and all tests performed support the planetary hypothesis. Blends with separation larger than 0.40 arcsec or triple systems are almost excluded with a 8 10-4 risk left. We conclude that, as far as we have been exhaustive, we have discovered a planetary companion, named CoRoT-7b, for which we derive a period of 0.853 59 +/- 3 10-5 day and a radius of Rp = 1.68 +/- 0.09 REarth. Analysis of preliminary radial velocity data yields an upper limit of 21 MEarth for the companion mass, supporting the finding. CoRoT-7b is very likely the first Super-Earth with a measured radius. [less ▲]

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See detailAn orbital period of 0.94days for the hot-Jupiter planet WASP-18b
Hellier, Coel; Anderson, D. R.; Cameron, A Collier et al

in Nature (2009), 460

The `hot Jupiters' that abound in lists of known extrasolar planets are thought to have formed far from their host stars, but migrate inwards through interactions with the proto-planetary disk from which ... [more ▼]

The `hot Jupiters' that abound in lists of known extrasolar planets are thought to have formed far from their host stars, but migrate inwards through interactions with the proto-planetary disk from which they were born, or by an alternative mechanism such as planet-planet scattering. The hot Jupiters closest to their parent stars, at orbital distances of only ~0.02 astronomical units, have strong tidal interactions, and systems such as OGLE-TR-56 have been suggested as tests of tidal dissipation theory. Here we report the discovery of planet WASP-18b with an orbital period of 0.94days and a mass of ten Jupiter masses (10M[SUB]Jup[/SUB]), resulting in a tidal interaction an order of magnitude stronger than that of planet OGLE-TR-56b. Under the assumption that the tidal-dissipation parameter Q of the host star is of the order of 10[SUP]6[/SUP], as measured for Solar System bodies and binary stars and as often applied to extrasolar planets, WASP-18b will be spiralling inwards on a timescale less than a thousandth that of the lifetime of its host star. Therefore either WASP-18 is in a rare, exceptionally short-lived state, or the tidal dissipation in this system (and possibly other hot-Jupiter systems) must be much weaker than in the Solar System. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscovery and characterization of WASP-6b, an inflated sub-Jupiter mass planet transiting a solar-type star
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Anderson, D. R.; Triaud, A H M J et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 501

We report the discovery of WASP-6b, an inflated sub-Jupiter mass planet transiting every 3.3610060[SUP]+ 0.0000022 [/SUP][SUB]- 0.0000035 [/SUB] days a mildly metal-poor solar-type star of magnitude V ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of WASP-6b, an inflated sub-Jupiter mass planet transiting every 3.3610060[SUP]+ 0.0000022 [/SUP][SUB]- 0.0000035 [/SUB] days a mildly metal-poor solar-type star of magnitude V = 11.9. A combined analysis of the WASP photometry, high-precision followup transit photometry and radial velocities yield a planetary mass M[SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.503[SUP]+0.019[/SUP][SUB]-0.038[/SUB] M[SUB]J[/SUB] and radius R[SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.224[SUP]+0.051[/SUP][SUB]-0.052[/SUB] R_J, resulting in a density rho[SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.27 ± 0.05 rho_J. The mass and radius for the host star are M_ast = 0.88[SUP]+0.05[/SUP][SUB]-0.08[/SUB] M_o and R_ast = 0.870[SUP]+0.025[/SUP][SUB]-0.036[/SUB] R_o. The non-zero orbital eccentricity e = 0.054^+0.018[SUB]-0.015[/SUB] that we measure suggests that the planet underwent a massive tidal heating 1 Gyr ago that could have contributed to its inflated radius. High-precision radial velocities obtained during a transit allow us to measure a sky-projected angle between the stellar spin and orbital axis beta = 11[SUP]+14[/SUP][SUB]-18[/SUB] deg. In addition to similar published measurements, this result favors a dominant migration mechanism based on tidal interactions with a protoplanetary disk. Based on data collected with the HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory in the programs 082.C-0040(E) and 082.C-0608. The photometric time-series and radial velocities (Tables 4, 5) used in this work are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/501/785 [less ▲]

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See detailThe Low Density Transiting Exoplanet WASP-15b
West, R. G.; Anderson, D. R.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Astronomical Journal (The) (2009), 137

We report the discovery of a low-density exoplanet transiting an 11th magnitude star in the Southern hemisphere. WASP-15b, which orbits its host star with a period P = 3.7520656 ± 0.0000028 d, has a mass ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a low-density exoplanet transiting an 11th magnitude star in the Southern hemisphere. WASP-15b, which orbits its host star with a period P = 3.7520656 ± 0.0000028 d, has a mass M [SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.542 ± 0.050 M [SUB]J[/SUB] and radius R [SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.428 ± 0.077 R [SUB]J[/SUB], and is therefore one of the least dense transiting exoplanets so far discovered (rho[SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.247 ± 0.035 g cm[SUP]--3[/SUP]). An analysis of the spectrum of the host star shows it to be of spectral type around F5, with an effective temperature T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 6300 ± 100 K and [Fe/H] = --0.17 ± 0.11. [less ▲]

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See detailImproved parameters for the transiting hot Jupiters WASP-4b and WASP-5b
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Smalley, B.; Hebb, L. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 496

The gaseous giant planets WASP-4b and WASP-5b are transiting 12-magnitude solar-type stars in the Southern hemisphere. The aim of the present work is to refine the parameters of these systems using high ... [more ▼]

The gaseous giant planets WASP-4b and WASP-5b are transiting 12-magnitude solar-type stars in the Southern hemisphere. The aim of the present work is to refine the parameters of these systems using high cadence VLT/FORS2 z-band transit photometry and high-resolution VLT/UVES spectroscopy. For WASP-4, the new estimates for the planet radius and mass from a combined analysis of our VLT data with previously published transit photometry and radial velocities are R[SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.30[SUP]+0.05[/SUP][SUB]-0.04[/SUB] R[SUB]J[/SUB] and M[SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.21[SUP]+0.13[/SUP][SUB]-0.08[/SUB] M_J, resulting in a density rho[SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.55[SUP]+0.04[/SUP][SUB]-0.02[/SUB] rho_J. The radius and mass for the host star are R_* = 0.87[SUP]+0.04[/SUP][SUB]-0.03[/SUB] R_o and M_* = 0.85[SUP]+0.11[/SUP][SUB]-0.07[/SUB] M_o. Our ground-based photometry reaches 550 ppm at time sampling of ~50 s. Nevertheless, we also report the presence of an instrumental effect on the VLT that degraded our photometry for the WASP-5 observations. This effect could be a major problem for similar programs. Our new estimates for the parameters of the WASP-5 system are R[SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.09 ± 0.07 R_J, M[SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.58[SUP]+0.13[/SUP][SUB]-0.10[/SUB] M_J, rho[SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.23 [SUP]+0.26[/SUP][SUB]-0.16[/SUB] rho_J, R_* = 1.03[SUP]+0.06[/SUP][SUB]-0.07[/SUB] R_o, and M_* = 0.96[SUP]+0.13[/SUP][SUB]-0.09[/SUB] M_o. The measured size of WASP-5b agrees well with the basic models of irradiated planets, while WASP-4b is clearly an ``anomalously'' large planet. Based on data collected with the FORS2 imager at the VLT-UT4 telescope and with the UVES spectrograph at the VLT-UT2 telescope (Paranal Observatory, ESO, Chile) in the programme 280.C-5003. [less ▲]

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See detailGJ 436c? The contribution of transit timings
Demory, B*-O; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Waelkens, C. et al

in IAU Symposium 253: Transiting planets (2009, February 01)

From recent high-accuracy transit timings measurements, we discard the 5 M_earth planet recently proposed by Ribas et al. (2008). Thanks to a combined radial-velocity and transit timings overview we also ... [more ▼]

From recent high-accuracy transit timings measurements, we discard the 5 M_earth planet recently proposed by Ribas et al. (2008). Thanks to a combined radial-velocity and transit timings overview we also define a mass/period domain in which a secondary planet may be found in the system. We also show that timings obtained until now, although not sufficient to remove degeneracies on mass and period, can still restrict the parameter space of the potential secondary planet. [less ▲]

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See detailThe HARPS search for southern extra-solar planets. XIV. Gl 176b, a super-Earth rather than a Neptune, and at a different period
Forveille, T.; Bonfils, X.; Delfosse, X. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 493

A 10.24-day Neptune-mass planet was recently announced as orbiting the nearby M2 dwarf Gl 176, based on 28 radial velocities measured with the HRS spectrograph on the Hobby-Heberly Telescope. We obtained ... [more ▼]

A 10.24-day Neptune-mass planet was recently announced as orbiting the nearby M2 dwarf Gl 176, based on 28 radial velocities measured with the HRS spectrograph on the Hobby-Heberly Telescope. We obtained 57 radial velocities of Gl 176 with the ESO 3.6 m telescope and the HARPS spectrograph, which is known for its sub-m s[SUP]-1[/SUP] stability. The median photon-noise standard error of our measurements is 1.1 m s[SUP]-1[/SUP], significantly lower than the 4.7 m s[SUP]-1[/SUP] of the HET velocities, and the 4-year period over which they were obtained overlaps considerably with the epochs of the HET measurements. The HARPS measurements show no evidence of a signal at the period of the putative HET planet, suggesting that its detection was spurious. We do find, on the other hand, strong evidence of a lower mass 8.4 M_Earth planet, in a quasi-circular orbit and at the different period of 8.78 days. The host star has moderate magnetic activity and rotates on a 39-day period, which we confirm through modulation of both contemporaneous photometry and chromospheric indices. We detect that period, as well, in the radial velocities, but it is well removed from the orbital period and offers no cause for confusion. This new detection of a super-Earth (2 M_Earth < M sin (i) < 10 M_Earth) around an M dwarf adds to the growing evidence that such planets are common around very low-mass stars. A third of the 20 known planets with M sin (i)< 0.1 M_Jup and 3 of the 7 known planets with M sin (i) < 10 M_Earth orbit an M dwarf, in contrast to just 4 of the ~300 known Jupiter-mass planets. Based on observations made with the HARPS instrument on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla Observatory under program ID 072.C-0488. [less ▲]

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See detailWasp-7: A Bright Transiting-Exoplanet System in the Southern Hemisphere
Hellier, Coel; Anderson, D. R.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2009), 690

We report that a Jupiter-mass planet, WASP-7b, transits the V = 9.5 star HD 197286 every 4.95 d. This is the brightest discovery from the WASP-South transit survey so far and is currently the brightest ... [more ▼]

We report that a Jupiter-mass planet, WASP-7b, transits the V = 9.5 star HD 197286 every 4.95 d. This is the brightest discovery from the WASP-South transit survey so far and is currently the brightest transiting-exoplanet system in the southern hemisphere. WASP-7b is among the densest of the known Jupiter-mass planets, suggesting that it has a massive core. The planet mass is 0.96[SUP]+0.12[/SUP] [SUB]--0.18[/SUB] M [SUB]Jup[/SUB], the radius is 0.915[SUP]+0.046[/SUP] [SUB]--0.040[/SUB] R [SUB]Jup[/SUB], and the density is 1.26[SUP]+0.25[/SUP] [SUB]--0.21[/SUB] rho[SUB]Jup[/SUB] (1.67[SUP]+0.33[/SUP] [SUB]--0.28[/SUB] g cm[SUP]--3[/SUP]). [less ▲]

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See detailThe Masses and Radii of HD186753B and TYC7096-222-1B: The First M-dwarfs known to Eclipse A-type Stars
Bentley, S. J.; Smalley, B.; Maxted, P. F. L. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009)

We present observations of two new single-lined eclipsing binaries, both consisting of an Am star and an M-dwarf, discovered by the Wide Angle Search for Planets transit photometry survey. Using WASP ... [more ▼]

We present observations of two new single-lined eclipsing binaries, both consisting of an Am star and an M-dwarf, discovered by the Wide Angle Search for Planets transit photometry survey. Using WASP photometry and spectroscopic measurements we find that HD186753B has an orbital period of $P=1.9194$ days, a mass of $M=0.24\pm0.02 M_{\odot}$ and radius of $R=0.31^{+0.06}_{-0.06} R_{\odot}$; and that TCY7096-222-1B has an orbital period of $P=8.9582$ days, a mass of between 0.29 and 0.54 $M_{\odot}$ depending on eccentricity and radius of $R=0.263^{+0.02}_{-0.07} R_{\odot}$. We find that the Am stars have relatively low rotational velocities that closely match the orbital velocities of the M-dwarfs, suggesting that they have been "spun-down" by the M-dwarfs. [less ▲]

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See detailVLT transit and occultation photometry for the bloated planet CoRoT-1b
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Demory, B.-O.; Triaud, A.H.M.J. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

We present VLT eclipse photometry for the giant planet CoRoT-1b. We observed a transit in the R-band filter and an occultation in a narrow filter centered on 2.09 microns. Our analysis of this new ... [more ▼]

We present VLT eclipse photometry for the giant planet CoRoT-1b. We observed a transit in the R-band filter and an occultation in a narrow filter centered on 2.09 microns. Our analysis of this new photometry and published radial velocities, in combination with stellar-evolutionary modeling, leads to a planetary mass and radius of 1.07 (+0.13,-0.18) M_Jup and 1.45 (+0.07,-0.13) R_Jup, confirming the very low density previously deduced from CoRoT photometry. The large occultation depth that we measure at 2.09 microns (0.278 (+0.043,-0.066) %) is consistent with thermal emission and is better reproduced by an atmospheric model with no redistribution of the absorbed stellar flux to the night side of the planet. [less ▲]

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See detailGround-based photometry of space-based transit detections: Photometric follow-up of the CoRoT mission
Deeg, H. J.; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Shporer, A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

The motivation, techniques and performance of the ground-based photometric follow-up of transit detections by the CoRoT space mission are presented. Its principal raison d’être arises from the much higher ... [more ▼]

The motivation, techniques and performance of the ground-based photometric follow-up of transit detections by the CoRoT space mission are presented. Its principal raison d’être arises from the much higher spatial resolution of common ground-based telescopes in comparison to CoRoT’s cameras. This allows the identification of many transit candidates as arising from eclipsing binaries that are contaminating CoRoT’s lightcurves, even in low-amplitude transit events that cannot be detected with ground-based obervations. For the ground observations, “on” – “off” photometry is now largely employed, in which only a short timeseries during a transit and a section outside a transit is observed and compared photometrically. CoRoTplanet candidates’ transits are being observed by a dedicated team with access to telescopes with sizes ranging from 0.2 to 2 m. As an example, the process that led to the rejection of contaminating eclipsing binaries near the host star of the Super-Earth planet CoRoT-7b is shown. Experiences and techniques from this work may also be useful for other transit-detection experiments, when the discovery instrument obtains data with a relatively low angular resolution. [less ▲]

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