References of "Phillips, Christophe"
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See detailFASST- a FMRI Artefact rejection and Sleep Scoring Toolbox
Schrouff, Jessica ULg; Leclercq, Yves ULg; Noirhomme, Quentin ULg et al

Poster (2011, June 28)

We started writing the “fMRI artefact rejection and sleep scoring toolbox”, or “FASST”, to process our sleep EEG-fMRI data, that is, the simultaneous recording of electroencephalographic and functional ... [more ▼]

We started writing the “fMRI artefact rejection and sleep scoring toolbox”, or “FASST”, to process our sleep EEG-fMRI data, that is, the simultaneous recording of electroencephalographic and functional magnetic resonance imaging data acquired while a subject is asleep. FAST tackles three crucial issues typical of this kind of data: (1) data manipulation (viewing, comparing, chunking, etc.) of long continuous M/EEG recordings, (2) rejection of the fMRI-induced artefact in the EEG signal, and (3)manual sleep-scoring of the M/EEG recording. Currently, the toolbox can efficiently deal with these issues via a GUI, SPM8 batching system or handwritten script. The tools developed are, of course, also useful for other EEG applications, for example, involving simultaneous EEG-fMRI acquisition, continuous EEG eye-balling, and manipulation. Even though the toolbox was originally devised for EEG data, it will also gracefully handle MEG data without any problem. “FAST” is developed in Matlab as an add-on toolbox for SPM8 and, therefore, internally uses its SPM8-meeg data format. “FAST” is available for free, under the GNU-GPL. [less ▲]

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See detailDecoding Directed Brain Activity in fMRI using Support Vector Machines and Gaussian Processes
Schrouff, Jessica ULg; Kussé, Caroline ULg; Wehenkel, Louis ULg et al

Poster (2011, June 26)

Predicting a particular cognitive state from a specific pattern of fMRI voxel values is still a methodological challenge. Decoding brain activity is usually performed in highly controlled experimental ... [more ▼]

Predicting a particular cognitive state from a specific pattern of fMRI voxel values is still a methodological challenge. Decoding brain activity is usually performed in highly controlled experimental paradigms characterized by a series of distinct states induced by a temporally constrained experimental design. In more realistic conditions, the number, sequence and duration of mental states are unpredictably generated by the individual, resulting in complex and imbalanced fMRI data sets. This study tests the classification of brain activity, acquired on 16 volunteers using fMRI, during mental imagery, a condition in which the number and duration of mental events were not externally imposed but self-generated. To deal with these issues, two classification techniques were considered (Support Vector Machines, SVM, and Gaussian Processes, GP), as well as different feature extraction methods (General Linear Model, GLM and SVM). These techniques were combined in order to identify the procedures leading to the highest accuracy measures. Our results showed that 12 data sets out of 16 could be significantly modeled by either SVM or GP. Model accuracies tended to be related to the degree of imbalance between classes and to task performance of the volunteers. We also conclude that the GP technique tends to be more robust than SVM to model unbalanced data sets. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain functional integration decreases during propofol-induced loss of consciousness.
Schrouff, Jessica ULg; Perlbarg, Vincent; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2011), 57(1), 198-205

Consciousness has been related to the amount of integrated information that the brain is able to generate. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that the loss of consciousness caused by propofol ... [more ▼]

Consciousness has been related to the amount of integrated information that the brain is able to generate. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that the loss of consciousness caused by propofol anesthesia is associated with a significant reduction in the capacity of the brain to integrate information. To assess the functional structure of the whole brain, functional integration and partial correlations were computed from fMRI data acquired from 18 healthy volunteers during resting wakefulness and propofol-induced deep sedation. Total integration was significantly reduced from wakefulness to deep sedation in the whole brain as well as within and between its constituent networks (or systems). Integration was systematically reduced within each system (i.e., brain or networks), as well as between networks. However, the ventral attentional network maintained interactions with most other networks during deep sedation. Partial correlations further suggested that functional connectivity was particularly affected between parietal areas and frontal or temporal regions during deep sedation. Our findings suggest that the breakdown in brain integration is the neural correlate of the loss of consciousness induced by propofol. They stress the important role played by parietal and frontal areas in the generation of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailPropofol anesthesia and sleep: a high-density EEG study.
Murphy, Michael; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Riedner, Brady A et al

in Sleep (2011), 34(3), 283-91

STUDY OBJECTIVES: The electrophysiological correlates of anesthetic sedation remain poorly understood. We used high-density electroencephalography (hd-EEG) and source modeling to investigate the cortical ... [more ▼]

STUDY OBJECTIVES: The electrophysiological correlates of anesthetic sedation remain poorly understood. We used high-density electroencephalography (hd-EEG) and source modeling to investigate the cortical processes underlying propofol anesthesia and compare them to sleep. DESIGN: 256-channel EEG recordings in humans during propofol anesthesia. SETTING: Hospital operating room. PATIENTS OR PARTICIPANTS: 8 healthy subjects (4 males) INTERVENTIONS: N/A MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Initially, propofol induced increases in EEG power from 12-25 Hz. Loss of consciousness (LOC) was accompanied by the appearance of EEG slow waves that resembled the slow waves of NREM sleep. We compared slow waves in propofol to slow waves recorded during natural sleep and found that both populations of waves share similar cortical origins and preferentially propagate along the mesial components of the default network. However, propofol slow waves were spatially blurred compared to sleep slow waves and failed to effectively entrain spindle activity. Propofol also caused an increase in gamma (25-40 Hz) power that persisted throughout LOC. Source modeling analysis showed that this increase in gamma power originated from the anterior and posterior cingulate cortices. During LOC, we found increased gamma functional connectivity between these regions compared to the wakefulness. CONCLUSIONS: Propofol anesthesia is a sleep-like state and slow waves are associated with diminished consciousness even in the presence of high gamma activity. CITATION: Murphy M; Bruno MA; Riedner BA; Boveroux P; Noirhomme Q; Landsness EC; Brichant JF; Phillips C; Massimini M; Laureys S; Tononi G; Boly M. Propofol anesthesia and sleep: a high-density EEG study. SLEEP 2011;34(3):283-291. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalyse multivariée par reconnaissance de formes : décodage cérébral
Schrouff, Jessica ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg

in Schnakers, Caroline; Laureys, Steven (Eds.) Coma et états de conscience altérée (2011)

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See detail"Relevance vector machine" consciousness classifier applied to cerebral metabolism of vegetative and locked-in patients.
Phillips, Christophe ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2011), 56(2), 797808

The vegetative state is a devastating condition where patients awaken from their coma (i.e., open their eyes) but fail to show any behavioural sign of conscious awareness. Locked-in syndrome patients also ... [more ▼]

The vegetative state is a devastating condition where patients awaken from their coma (i.e., open their eyes) but fail to show any behavioural sign of conscious awareness. Locked-in syndrome patients also awaken from their coma and are unable to show any motor response to command (except for small eye movements or blinks) but recover full conscious awareness of self and environment. Bedside evaluation of residual cognitive function in coma survivors often is difficult because motor responses may be very limited or inconsistent. We here aimed to disentangle vegetative from "locked-in" patients by an automatic procedure based on machine learning using fluorodeoxyglucose PET data obtained in 37 healthy controls and in 13 patients in a vegetative state. Next, the trained machine was tested on brain scans obtained in 8 patients with locked-in syndrome. We used a sparse probabilistic Bayesian learning framework called "relevance vector machine" (RVM) to classify the scans. The trained RVM classifier, applied on an input scan, returns a probability value (p-value) of being in one class or the other, here being "conscious" or not. Training on the control and vegetative state groups was assessed with a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure, leading to 100% classification accuracy. When applied on the locked-in patients, all scans were classified as "conscious" with a mean p-value of .95 (min .85). In conclusion, even with this relatively limited data set, we could train a classifier distinguishing between normal consciousness (i.e., wakeful conscious awareness) and the vegetative state (i.e., wakeful unawareness). Cross-validation also indicated that the clinical classification and the one predicted by the automatic RVM classifier were in accordance. Moreover, when applied on a third group of "locked-in" consciously aware patients, they all had a strong probability of being similar to the normal controls, as expected. Therefore, RVM classification of cerebral metabolic images obtained in coma survivors could become a useful tool for the automated PET-based diagnosis of altered states of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailDepression alters "top-down" visual attention: a dynamic causal modeling comparison between depressed and healthy subjects.
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Schwartz, Sophie; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2011), 54(2), 1662-8

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we recently demonstrated that nonmedicated patients with a first episode of unipolar major depression (MDD) compared to matched controls exhibited an ... [more ▼]

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we recently demonstrated that nonmedicated patients with a first episode of unipolar major depression (MDD) compared to matched controls exhibited an abnormal neural filtering of irrelevant visual information (Desseilles et al., 2009). During scanning, subjects performed a visual attention task imposing two different levels of attentional load at fixation (low or high), while task-irrelevant colored stimuli were presented in the periphery. In the present study, we focused on the visuo-attentional system and used "Dynamic Causal Modeling" (DCM) on the same dataset to assess how attention influences a network of three dynamically-interconnected brain regions (visual areas V1 and V4, and intraparietal sulcus (P), differentially in MDD patients and healthy controls. Bayesian model selection (BMS) and model space partitioning (MSP) were used to determine the best model in each population. The best model for the controls revealed that the increase of parietal activity by high attention load was selectively associated with a negative modulation of P on V4, consistent with high attention reducing the processing of irrelevant colored peripheral stimuli. The best model accounting for the data from the MDD patients showed that both low and high attention levels exerted modulatory effects on P. The present results document abnormal effective connectivity across visuo-attentional networks in MDD, which likely contributes to deficient attentional filtering of information. [less ▲]

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See detailTwo distinct neuronal networks mediate the awareness of environment and of self
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Demertzi, Athina ULg; Schabus, Manuel et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2011), 23(3), 570-578

Evidence from functional neuroimaging studies on resting state suggests that there are two distinct anticorrelated cortical systems that mediate conscious awareness: an "extrinsic" system that encompasses ... [more ▼]

Evidence from functional neuroimaging studies on resting state suggests that there are two distinct anticorrelated cortical systems that mediate conscious awareness: an "extrinsic" system that encompasses lateral fronto-parietal areas and has been linked with processes of external input (external awareness), and an "intrinsic" system which encompasses mainly medial brain areas and has been associated with internal processes (internal awareness). The aim of our study was to explore the neural correlates of resting state by providing behavioral and neuroimaging data from healthy volunteers. With no a priori assumptions, we first determined behaviorally the relationship between external and internal awareness in 31 subjects. We found a significant anticorrelation between external and internal awareness with a mean switching frequency of 0.05 Hz (range: 0.01-0.1 Hz). Interestingly, this frequency is similar to BOLD fMRI slow oscillations. We then evaluated 22 healthy volunteers in an fMRI paradigm looking for brain areas where BOLD activity correlated with "internal" and "external" scores. Activation of precuneus/posterior cingulate, anterior cingulate/mesiofrontal cortices, and parahippocampal areas ("intrinsic system") was linearly linked to intensity of internal awareness, whereas activation of lateral fronto-parietal cortices ("extrinsic system") was linearly associated with intensity of external awareness. [less ▲]

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See detailInterplay between spontaneous and induced brain activity during human non-rapid eye movement sleep.
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Bonjean, Maxime; Schabus, Manuel et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2011), 108(37), 15438-43

Humans are less responsive to the surrounding environment during sleep. However, the extent to which the human brain responds to external stimuli during sleep is uncertain. We used simultaneous EEG and ... [more ▼]

Humans are less responsive to the surrounding environment during sleep. However, the extent to which the human brain responds to external stimuli during sleep is uncertain. We used simultaneous EEG and functional MRI to characterize brain responses to tones during wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Sounds during wakefulness elicited responses in the thalamus and primary auditory cortex. These responses persisted in NREM sleep, except throughout spindles, during which they became less consistent. When sounds induced a K complex, activity in the auditory cortex was enhanced and responses in distant frontal areas were elicited, similar to the stereotypical pattern associated with slow oscillations. These data show that sound processing during NREM sleep is constrained by fundamental brain oscillatory modes (slow oscillations and spindles), which result in a complex interplay between spontaneous and induced brain activity. The distortion of sensory information at the thalamic level, especially during spindles, functionally isolates the cortex from the environment and might provide unique conditions favorable for off-line memory processing. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentifying the default-mode component in spatial IC analyses of patients with disorders of consciousness.
Soddu, Andrea ULg; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2011)

Objectives:Recent fMRI studies have shown that it is possible to reliably identify the default-mode network (DMN) in the absence of any task, by resting-state connectivity analyses in healthy volunteers ... [more ▼]

Objectives:Recent fMRI studies have shown that it is possible to reliably identify the default-mode network (DMN) in the absence of any task, by resting-state connectivity analyses in healthy volunteers. We here aimed to identify the DMN in the challenging patient population of disorders of consciousness encountered following coma. Experimental design: A spatial independent component analysis-based methodology permitted DMN assessment, decomposing connectivity in all its different sources either neuronal or artifactual. Three different selection criteria were introduced assessing anticorrelation-corrected connectivity with or without an automatic masking procedure and calculating connectivity scores encompassing both spatial and temporal properties. These three methods were validated on 10 healthy controls and applied to an independent group of 8 healthy controls and 11 severely brain-damaged patients [locked-in syndrome (n = 2), minimally conscious (n = 1), and vegetative state (n = 8)]. Principal observations: All vegetative patients showed fewer connections in the default-mode areas, when compared with controls, contrary to locked-in patients who showed near-normal connectivity. In the minimally conscious-state patient, only the two selection criteria considering both spatial and temporal properties were able to identify an intact right lateralized BOLD connectivity pattern, and metabolic PET data suggested its neuronal origin. Conclusions: When assessing resting-state connectivity in patients with disorders of consciousness, it is important to use a methodology excluding non-neuronal contributions caused by head motion, respiration, and heart rate artifacts encountered in all studied patients. Hum Brain Mapp, 2011. (c) 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailfMRI Artefact Rejection and Sleep Scoring Toolbox
Leclercq, Yves ULg; Schrouff, Jessica ULg; Noirhomme, Quentin ULg et al

in Computational Intelligence & Neuroscience (2011)

This paper proposes a toolbox for handling large EEG/ MEG data sets, rejecting the artefact linked to joint fMRI-EEG acquisitions and scoring data sets.

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See detailChanges in functional interactions during anaesthesia-induced loss of consciousness
Schrouff, Jessica ULg; Perlbarg, Vincent; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

Poster (2010, December 12)

Consciousness has been related to the amount of integrated information that the brain is able to generate. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that the loss of consciousness caused by propofol ... [more ▼]

Consciousness has been related to the amount of integrated information that the brain is able to generate. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that the loss of consciousness caused by propofol anesthesia is associated with a significant reduction in the capacity of the brain to integrate information. To assess the functional structure of the whole brain, functional integration and partial correlations were computed from fMRI data acquired from 18 healthy volunteers during resting wakefulness and propofol-induced deep sedation. Total integration was significantly reduced from wakefulness to deep sedation in the whole brain as well as within and between its constituent networks (or systems). Integration was systematically reduced within each system (i.e., brain or networks), as well as between networks. However, the ventral attentional network maintained interactions with most other networks during deep sedation. Partial correlations further suggested that functional connectivity was particularly affected between parietal areas and frontal or temporal regions during deep sedation. Our findings suggest that the breakdown in brain integration is the neural correlate of the loss of consciousness induced by propofol. They stress the important role played by parietal and frontal areas in the generation of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural correlates of cognitive control at the item level in the Stroop task.
Grandjean, Julien ULg; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Fias, Wim et al

Poster (2010, November 15)

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See detailInfluence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor val66met human polymorphism on declarative memory consolidation
Mascetti, Laura ULg; Foret, Ariane ULg; Matarazzo, Luca et al

Poster (2010, November 15)

The Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin which in the adult brain regulates long-term potentiation. In humans, valine (val) to methionine (met) substitution in the 5’ pro-region of ... [more ▼]

The Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin which in the adult brain regulates long-term potentiation. In humans, valine (val) to methionine (met) substitution in the 5’ pro-region of the BDNF protein is associated with poorer episodic memory. Neurons transfected with met-BDNF-Green Fluorescence Protein showed lower depolarization-induced secretion, while constitutive secretion is unchanged. Here, we hypothesized that the differences in BDNF release determined by this polymorphism would influence memory consolidation and that in comparison with the val/met (=val/met or met/met), val/val individuals would show higher memory performance and different brain responses during a 16h-delayed rather than immediate retrieval session. Participants encoded a series of neutral faces in the afternoon. Retrieval sessions took place one hour after the encoding session, and in the following morning, during the acquisition of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) time series with a 3 Tesla Allegra scanner. During retrieval, studied faces and new ones were presented in random order. For each stimulus, the subjects indicated whether they could retrieve the encoding episode with (“Remember”), or without details (“Know”), or if they thought the item had not been presented during encoding (“New”). A repeated-measure ANOVA on discrimination index (d’) showed significant effects of group (F(1, 27)=8.65, p=0.007, n(val/val)=14, n(val/met)=15) and session (F(1, 27)=24.64, p=0.000), although the group by session interaction was not significant (F(1, 27)=1.29, p=0.267). fMRI results showed a significant genotype (val/val > val/met) by session (delayed > immediate retrieval) by memory type (Remember > Know) interaction in the right inferior occipital gyrus (x=42, y=-78, z=0, p=0.004, Z=3.77), the left inferior parietal lobule (x=-56, y=-40, z=48, p=0.013, Z=3.43), the posterior cingulate cortex (x=14, y=-42, z=42, p=0.019, Z=3.29) and the right hippocampus (x=28, y=-22, z=-22, p=0.03, Z=3.11). Val/val individuals demonstrate higher memory performance than met-carriers but the change in memory performance between immediate and delayed retests is similar in both allelic groups. In contrast, neural correlates of recollection change between sessions differently according to genotype: responses increase significantly more in val/val than in val/met individuals in brain areas involved in the retrieval, accumulation and binding of perceptual memory details during delayed, relative to immediate retest. These data suggest that activity-dependent BDNF release promotes memory consolidation during the first post-training hours. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural correlates of cognitive control at the item specific level in the Stroop task
Grandjean, Julien ULg; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Fias, Wim et al

Poster (2010, May 04)

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See detailFunctional connectivity and dynamic causal modeling
Phillips, Christophe ULg

Scientific conference (2010, May 03)

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See detailResponse to Comment on “Homeostatic Sleep Pressure and Responses to Sustained Attention in the Suprachiasmatic Area”
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg et al

in Science (2010)

Astafiev et al. question whether the blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) response that we reported in the brainstem was located in the locus coeruleus (LC). Using high-resolution T1-turbo spin echo images ... [more ▼]

Astafiev et al. question whether the blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) response that we reported in the brainstem was located in the locus coeruleus (LC). Using high-resolution T1-turbo spin echo images (T1-TSE) acquired in an independent group of subjects, we show that the reported task-related BOLD response in the brainstem is actually compatible with the anatomical location of the LC. [less ▲]

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See detailBrainstem specific warping improves locus coeruleus functional imaging in humans
Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Schmidt, Christina ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg et al

in Proceedings of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine ... Scientific Meeting and Exhibition. International Society For Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. Scientific Meeting and Exhibition (2010)

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See detailAutomatic brain image reading for the differential diagnosis between atypical parkinsonian syndromes & Parkinson's disease
Garraux, Gaëtan ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg; Lemaire, Christian ULg et al

in Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society (2010), 25(7), 379-379

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (5 ULg)