References of "Phillips, Christophe"
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See detailBlue Light Stimulates Cognitive Brain Activity in Visually Blind Individuals
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Collignon, Olivier; Hull, Joseph et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2013)

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See detailLocalizing and comparing weight maps generated from linear kernel machine learning models
Schrouff, Jessica ULg; CREMERS, Julien ULg; GARRAUX, Gaëtan ULg et al

in 2013 Third International Workshop on Pattern Recognition in NeuroImaging (PRNI 2013): proceedings (2013)

Recently, machine learning models have been applied to neuroimaging data, allowing to make predictions about a variable of interest based on the pattern of activation or anatomy over a set of voxels ... [more ▼]

Recently, machine learning models have been applied to neuroimaging data, allowing to make predictions about a variable of interest based on the pattern of activation or anatomy over a set of voxels. These pattern recognition based methods present undeniable assets over classical (univariate) techniques, by providing predictions for unseen data, as well as the weights of each voxel in the model. However, the obtained weight map cannot be thresholded to perform regionally specific inference, leading to a difficult localization of the variable of interest. In this work, we provide local averages of the weights according to regions defined by anatomical or functional atlases (e.g. Brodmann atlas). These averages can then be ranked, thereby providing a sorted list of regions that can be (to a certain extent) compared with univariate results. Furthermore, we defined a “ranking distance”, allowing for the quantitative comparison between localized patterns. These concepts are illustrated with two datasets. [less ▲]

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See detailPattern Recognition for Neuroimaging Toolbox
Schrouff, Jessica ULg; Rosa, Maria; Rondina, Jane et al

in Suykens, J.A.K.; Argyriou, A.; De Brabanter, K. (Eds.) et al International workshop on advances in Regularization, Optimization, Kernel Methods and Support Vector Machines: theory and applications (ROKS 2013), Book of Abstracts (2013)

In the past years, mass univariate statistical analyses of neuroimaging data have been complemented by the use of multivariate pattern analyses, especially based on machine learning models. While these ... [more ▼]

In the past years, mass univariate statistical analyses of neuroimaging data have been complemented by the use of multivariate pattern analyses, especially based on machine learning models. While these allow an increased sensitivity for the detection of spatially distributed e ffects compared to univariate techniques, they lack an established and accessible software framework. Here we introduce the \Pattern Recognition for Neuroimaging Toolbox" (PRoNTo), an open-source, cross-platform and MATLAB-based software comprising many necessary functionalities for machine learning modelling of neuroimaging data. [less ▲]

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See detailClassification of MCI and AD patients combining PET data and psychological scores
Segovia-Román, Fermín ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in International Workshop on Advances in Regularization, Optimization, Kernel Methods and Support Vector Machines: theory and applications (2013)

This study’s aim was to measure the advantages of using psychological test data in the automatic classification of functional brain images in order to assist the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders ... [more ▼]

This study’s aim was to measure the advantages of using psychological test data in the automatic classification of functional brain images in order to assist the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Several computer-aided diagnosis systems for AD based on PET images were developed. Some of them used psychological scores beside the image data in the classification step and others did not. The results show the ones that take into account the psychological scores achieve higher accuracy rates. [less ▲]

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See detailAutomatic differentiation between Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment combining PET data and psychological scores
Segovia-Román, Fermín ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in 3rd International Workshop on Pattern Recognition in Neuroimaging (2013)

In recent years, several approaches to develop computer aided diagnosis systems for dementia have been pro- posed. The purpose of this work is to measure the advantages of using not only brain images as ... [more ▼]

In recent years, several approaches to develop computer aided diagnosis systems for dementia have been pro- posed. The purpose of this work is to measure the advantages of using not only brain images as data source for those systems but also some psychological scores. To this aim, we compared the accuracy rates achieved by systems that use psychological scores beside the image data in the classification step and systems that use only the image data. The experiments show that the formers achieve higher accuracy rates regardless of the procedure carried out to analyze the image data. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep stabilizes visuomotor adaptation memory: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study
Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Sterpenich, Virginie et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2013), 22(2), 144-54

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See detailItem familiarity and controlled associative retrieval in Alzheimer's disease: An fMRI study
Genon, Sarah ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2013), 49

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See detailBenevolent sexism alters executive brain responses
Dardenne, Benoît ULg; Dumont, Murielle; Sarlet, Marie et al

in Neuroreport (2013), 24(10), 572-577

Benevolence is widespread in our societies. It is defined as considering a subordinate group nicely but condescendingly, that is, with charity. Deleterious consequences for the target have been reported ... [more ▼]

Benevolence is widespread in our societies. It is defined as considering a subordinate group nicely but condescendingly, that is, with charity. Deleterious consequences for the target have been reported in the literature. In this experiment, we used functional MRI (fMRI) to identify whether being the target of (sexist) benevolence induces changes in brain activity associated with a working memory task. Participants were confronted by benevolent, hostile, or neutral comments before and while performing a reading span test in an fMRI environment. fMRI data showed that brain regions associated previously with intrusive thought suppression (bilateral, dorsolateral,prefrontal, and anterior cingulate cortex) reacted specifically to benevolent sexism compared with hostile sexism and neutral conditions during the performance of the task. These findings indicate that, despite being subjectively positive, benevolence modifies task-related brain networks by recruiting supplementary areas likely to impede optimal cognitive performance. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of blindness onset on the functional organization and the connectivity of the occipital cortex
Collignon, Olivier; Dormal, Giulia; Albouy, Geneviève et al

in Brain : A Journal of Neurology (2013)

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See detailExploration of the mechanisms underlying the ISPC effect: Evidence from behavioral and neuroimaging data
Grandjean, Julien; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Fias, Wim et al

in Neuropsychologia (2013), 51

The item-specific proportion congruent (ISPC) effect in a Stroop task – the observation of reduced interference for color words mostly presented in an incongruent color – has attracted growing interest ... [more ▼]

The item-specific proportion congruent (ISPC) effect in a Stroop task – the observation of reduced interference for color words mostly presented in an incongruent color – has attracted growing interest since the original study by Jacoby (2003). Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain the effect: associative learning of contingencies and item-specific control through word reading modulation. Both interpretations have received empirical support from behavioral data. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the responsible mechanisms of the ISPC effect with the classic two-item sets design using fMRI. Results showed that the ISPC effect is associated with increased activity in the anterior cingulate (ACC), dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC), and inferior and superior parietal cortex. Importantly, behavioral and fMRI analyses specifically addressing the respective contribution of associative learning and item-specific control mechanisms brought support for the contingency learning account of the ISPC effect. Results are discussed in reference to task and procedure characteristics that may influence the extent to which item-specific control and/or contingency learning contribute to the ISPC effect. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of visual perceptual learning on sleep and local slow wave initiation
Mascetti, Laura ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Matarazzo, Luca et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2013)

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See detailDiscriminant BOLD Activation Patterns during Mental Imagery in Parkinson’s Disease
Schrouff, Jessica ULg; Cremers, Julien ULg; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg et al

in Proceedings of MLINI 2012 (2012, December 07)

Using machine learning based models in clinical applications has become current practice and can prove useful to provide information at the subject’s level, such as predicting an (early) diagnosis or ... [more ▼]

Using machine learning based models in clinical applications has become current practice and can prove useful to provide information at the subject’s level, such as predicting an (early) diagnosis or monitoring the evolution of a disease. However, the performance of these models depends on the choice of a biomarker to detect the presence or absence of a disease. Choosing a biomarker is not straightforward, especially in the case of Parkinson’s disease when compared to healthy subjects. In the present work, we investigated the mental imagery of gait as a biomarker of Parkinson’s disease and showed that the signal in the mesencephalic locomotor region during the mental imagery of gait at a comfortable pace can discriminate significantly between idiopathic Parkinson’s disease patients and healthy subjects. Although there is room for improvement, the results of this preliminary study are promising. [less ▲]

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See detailNoise correction for diffusion kurtosis imaging
André, Elodie ULg; Farrher, Ezequiel; Maximov, Ivan et al

Poster (2012, November)

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See detailDosimetry for 6-[18F]Fluoro-L-DOPA in Humans Based on Biodistribution in Mice
Bretin, Florian ULg; Warnock, Geoffrey ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

Poster (2012, October)

Aim. The objective of this work was to estimate human dosimetry for 6-[18F]Fluoro-L-DOPA (F-DOPA) from biodistribution in mice, obtained from organ harvesting at different time points and from a hybrid ... [more ▼]

Aim. The objective of this work was to estimate human dosimetry for 6-[18F]Fluoro-L-DOPA (F-DOPA) from biodistribution in mice, obtained from organ harvesting at different time points and from a hybrid method combining dynamic PET followed by organ harvesting. Materials and methods. The tissue distribution of F-DOPA over time was determined in isoflurane-anaesthetized mice. Radioassay was performed on harvested organs at 2, 5, 10, 30, 60 and 120 minutes post administration (n = 5 at each time point). Dynamic PET images were acquired in list-mode with a Siemens FOCUS 120 microPET for 120 minutes after injection and followed by radioassay of harvested organs (n = 4). List-mode data were histogrammed in 6*5s, 6*10s, 3*20s, 5*30s, 5*60s, 8*150s, 6*300s, 6*600s 3D sinograms. Final images were obtained using filtered backprojection with correction for all physical effects except for scatter. Attenuation correction resulted from a pre-injection transmission scan with a cobalt-57 point source. Organs were manually delineated. The organ time-activity-curves (TACs) from both methods were extrapolated from a simulated 35 g standard mouse to a 70 kg standard male human using a technique based on organ to bodyweight ratios. A bladder voiding scenario was used to simulate excretion every 2 h. The absorbed doses in major human organs were calculated using the extrapolated TACs with the commercially available software OLINDA/EXM (Version 1.1). Results. The extrapolated organ activity curves obtained using the harvesting and imaging methods showed a high correlation (r = 0.94 ± 0.05, p < 0.001). However, TACs from PET alone under- or overestimated the activity in individual organs in contrast to TACs obtained using the cross-calibration of the PET data with the activity in post-scan dissected organs. Those organs in the excretion pathways, comprising bladder wall, kidneys and liver, received the highest organ doses. The total body absorbed dose was 0.0118 mGy/MBq for both the imaging based and harvesting based methods. The effective dose was 0.0193 mSv/MBq for the hybrid imaging-harvesting technique and 0.0189 mSv/MBq for the pure harvesting technique. Conclusion. The doses obtained agreed well with the few results available in the literature. The hybrid technique combining dynamic PET scanning followed by organ harvesting appeared to be a good alternative to the gold standard ex vivo radioassay method. It is much faster and minimizes the effect of some weakness of the pure imaging technique, such as partial volume effect. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence for a role of a cortico-subcortical network for automatic and unconscious motor inhibition of manual responses
D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2012)

It is now clear that non-consciously perceived stimuli can bias our decisions. Although previous researches highlighted the importance of automatic and unconscious processes involved in voluntary action ... [more ▼]

It is now clear that non-consciously perceived stimuli can bias our decisions. Although previous researches highlighted the importance of automatic and unconscious processes involved in voluntary action, the neural correlates of such processes remain unclear. Basal ganglia dysfunctions have long been associated with impairment in automatic motor control. In addition, a key role of the medial frontal cortex has been suggested by administrating a subliminal masked prime task to a patient with a small lesion restricted to the supplementary motor area (SMA). In this task, invisible masked arrows stimuli were followed by visible arrow targets for a left or right hand response at different interstimuli intervals (ISI), producing a traditional facilitation effect for compatible trials at short ISI and a reversal inhibitory effect at longer ISI. Here, by using fast event-related fMRI and a weighted parametric analysis, we showed BOLD related activity changes in a cortico-subcortical network, especially in the SMA and the striatum, directly linked to the individual behavioral pattern. This new imaging result corroborates previous works on subliminal priming using lesional approaches. This finding implies that one of the roles of these regions was to suppress a partially activated movement below the threshold of awareness. [less ▲]

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See detailDosimetry for 6-[18F]Fluoro-L-DOPA in humans based on in vivo microPET scans and ex vivo tissue distribution in mice
Bretin, Florian ULg; Warnock, Geoffrey ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

Poster (2012, September)

Radiation dosimetry of new radiopharmaceuticals generally starts with studies in small animals such as mice and rats. The traditional technique has long been ex vivo measurement of the biodistribution ... [more ▼]

Radiation dosimetry of new radiopharmaceuticals generally starts with studies in small animals such as mice and rats. The traditional technique has long been ex vivo measurement of the biodistribution over time using harvested organs at different times post administration of the radiopharmaceutical. Since this approach requires a significant amount of animals, dynamic microPET studies, where the biodistribution of the tracer over time can be determined in vivo in a single scan, are an invaluable alternative. Due to known imaging artifacts and limitations, such as partial volume effect, a hybrid technique combining harvesting organs (post-scan) and dynamic imaging was introduced to achieve a cross-calibration to account for these limitations. Since 6-[18F]Fluoro-L-DOPA is a widely used PET tracer to study the dopaminergic system in neurology and oncology and there is no sound published dosimetry data, absorbed doses for major organs in humans were estimated using the traditional ex vivo technique and by dynamic microPET imaging in mice, allowing direct comparison of the results from the two techniques. The tissue distribution over time of 6-[18F]Fluoro-L-DOPA was determined by radioassay of harvested organs at 2, 5, 10, 30, 60, 120 minutes post administration (n=5 at each time point) in isoflurane-anaesthetized mice. Dynamic PET images were acquired with a FOCUS 120 microPET for 120 minutes after injection of 6-[18F]Fluoro-L-DOPA followed by radioassay of harvested organs (n=4). A bladder voiding scenario was used to simulate excretion every 2 h. The organ time-activity-curves (TACs) from both methods were extrapolated from a simulated 35 g standard mouse to a 70 kg standard male human using a technique based on organ to bodyweight ratios. The absorbed doses in major human organs were calculated with the commercially available human dosimetry software OLINDA/EXM (Version 1.1) using the extrapolated TACs. The extrapolated organ TACs obtained using the two methods showed a high correlation (average r = 0.94 ± 0.05, p < 0.001). However, TACs from PET alone under- or overestimated the activity in individual organs in contrast to TACs obtained using the cross-calibration of the PET data with the activity in post-scan dissected organs. Those organs in the excretion pathways, comprising bladder wall, kidneys and liver, received the highest organ doses. The total body absorbed dose was 0.0118 mGy/MBq for both the imaging based and harvesting based methods. The effective dose was 0.0193 mSv/MBq for the hybrid imaging-harvesting technique and 0.0189 mSv/MBq for the pure harvesting technique. Scaling errors in the PET TACs are likely caused by quantification errors such as partial volume effects and image artifacts. The use of a hybrid imaging technique to cross-calibrate the TACs improved the accuracy of the imaging-based dosimetry estimates. Therefore the hybrid technique combining dynamic imaging and harvesting organs (post-scan) is a suitable alternative to the gold standard ex vivo radioassay method. It yields comparable results yet reduces significantly the amount of animals needed in the study and can accelerate data acquisition. [less ▲]

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See detailItem familiarity and controlled associative retrieval in Alzheimer’s disease: an fMRI study.
Genon, Sarah ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg et al

in Proceedings of the Amsterdam Memory Slam 2012 (2012, August 30)

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterised by altered recollection function, with impaired controlled retrieval of associations. In contrast, familiarity-based memory for individual items may sometimes be ... [more ▼]

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterised by altered recollection function, with impaired controlled retrieval of associations. In contrast, familiarity-based memory for individual items may sometimes be preserved in early stages of the disease. This is the first study that directly examines whole brain regional activity engaged during one core aspect of the recollection function: associative controlled episodic retrieval (CER), contrasted to item familiarity in AD patients. Cerebral activity related to associative CER and item familiarity in AD patients and healthy controls (HC) was measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging during a word-pair recognition task to which the process dissociation procedure was applied. Some patients had null CER estimates (AD-), whereas others did show some CER abilities (AD+) although significantly less than HC. In contrast, familiarity estimates were equivalent in the three groups. In AD+ like in controls, associative CER activated the inferior precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). However, during associative CER, functional connection between this region and the hippocampus, the inferior parietal and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was significantly higher in HC than in AD+. In the three groups, item familiarity was related to activation along the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). In conclusion, whereas the preserved automatic detection of an old item (without retrieval of accurate word association) is related to a parietal activation centred on the IPS, the inferior precuneus/PCC supports associative CER ability in AD patients as in HC. However, AD patients have deficient functional connectivity during associative CER suggesting that residual recollection function in these patients might be impoverished by lack of some recollection-related aspects such as autonoetic quality, episodic details and verification. [less ▲]

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See detailDecoding spontaneous brain activity from fMRI using Gaussian Processes: tracking brain reactivation
Schrouff, Jessica ULg; Kussé, Caroline ULg; Wehenkel, Louis ULg et al

in 2012 Second International Workshop on Pattern Recognition in NeuroImaging (PRNI 2012): proceedings (2012, July 03)

While Multi-Variate Pattern Analysis techniques based on machine learning have now been regularly applied to neuroimaging data, decoding brain activity is usually performed in highly controlled ... [more ▼]

While Multi-Variate Pattern Analysis techniques based on machine learning have now been regularly applied to neuroimaging data, decoding brain activity is usually performed in highly controlled experimental paradigms. In more realistic conditions, the number, sequence and duration of mental states are unpredictably generated by the individual, resulting in complex and imbalanced fMRI data sets. Moreover, in the case of spontaneous brain activity, the mental states can not be linked to any external or internal stimulation, which makes it a highly difficult condition to decode. This study tests the classification of brain activity, acquired on 14 volunteers using fMRI, during mental imagery, a condition in which the number and duration of mental events were not externally imposed but self-generated. Application of the obtained model on rest sessions allowed classifying spontaneous brain activity linked to the task which, overall, correlated with their behavioural performance to the task. [less ▲]

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