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See detailWASP-29b: A Saturn-sized Transiting Exoplanet
Hellier, Coel; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A. et al

in Astrophysical Journal Letters (2010), 723

We report the discovery of a Saturn-sized planet transiting a V = 11.3, K4 dwarf star every 3.9 days. WASP-29b has a mass of 0.24 ± 0.02 M [SUB]Jup[/SUB] and a radius of 0.79 ± 0.05 R [SUB]Jup[/SUB ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a Saturn-sized planet transiting a V = 11.3, K4 dwarf star every 3.9 days. WASP-29b has a mass of 0.24 ± 0.02 M [SUB]Jup[/SUB] and a radius of 0.79 ± 0.05 R [SUB]Jup[/SUB], making it the smallest planet so far discovered by the WASP survey, and the exoplanet most similar in mass and radius to Saturn. The host star WASP-29 has an above-solar metallicity and fits a possible correlation for Saturn-mass planets such that planets with higher-metallicity host stars have higher core masses and thus smaller radii. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-32b: A transiting hot Jupiter planet orbiting a lithium-poor, solar-type star
Maxted, P. F. L.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A. et al

in Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific [=PASP] (2010), 122(898), 1465-1470

We report the discovery of a transiting planet orbiting the star TYC 2-1155-1. The star, WASP-32, is a moderately bright (V=11.3) solar-type star (Teff=6100 +- 100K, [Fe/H] = -0.13 +- 0.10). The ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a transiting planet orbiting the star TYC 2-1155-1. The star, WASP-32, is a moderately bright (V=11.3) solar-type star (Teff=6100 +- 100K, [Fe/H] = -0.13 +- 0.10). The lightcurve of the star obtained with the WASP-South and WASP-North instruments shows periodic transit-like features with a depth of about 1% and a duration of 0.10d every 2.72d. The presence of a transit-like feature in the lightcurve is confirmed using z-band photometry obtained with Faulkes Telescope North. High resolution spectroscopy obtained with the CORALIE spectrograph confirms the presence of a planetary mass companion. From a combined analysis of the spectroscopic and photometric data, assuming that the star is a typical main-sequence star, we estimate that the planet has a mass M_p = 3.60 +- 0.07 M_Jup and a radius R_p = 1.19 +- 0.06R_Jup. WASP-32 is one of a small group of hot Jupiters with masses M_p > 3M_Jup. We find that some stars with hot Jupiter companions and with masses M_* =~ 1.2M_sun, including WASP-32, are depleted in lithium, but that the majority of these stars have similar lithium abundances to field stars. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-24 b: A New Transiting Close-in Hot Jupiter Orbiting a Late F-star
Street, R. A.; Simpson, E.; Barros, S. C. C. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2010), 720

We report the discovery of a new transiting close-in giant planet, WASP-24 b, in a 2.341 day orbit, 0.037 AU from its F8-9 type host star. By matching the star's spectrum with theoretical models, we infer ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a new transiting close-in giant planet, WASP-24 b, in a 2.341 day orbit, 0.037 AU from its F8-9 type host star. By matching the star's spectrum with theoretical models, we infer an effective temperature T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 6075 ± 100 K and a surface gravity of log g = 4.15 ± 0.10. A comparison of these parameters with theoretical isochrones and evolutionary mass tracks places only weak constraints on the age of the host star, which we estimate to be 3.8[SUP]+1.3[/SUP] [SUB]-1.2[/SUB] Gyr. The planetary nature of the companion was confirmed by radial velocity measurements and additional photometric observations. These data were fit simultaneously in order to determine the most probable parameter set for the system, from which we infer a planetary mass of 1.071[SUP]+0.036[/SUP] [SUB]-0.038[/SUB] M [SUB]Jup[/SUB] and radius 1.3[SUP]+0.039[/SUP] [SUB]-0.037[/SUB] R [SUB]Jup[/SUB]. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission XIV. CoRoT-11b: a transiting massive "hot-Jupiter" in a prograde orbit around a rapidly rotating F-type star
Gandolfi, D.; Hébrard, G.; Alonso, R. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 524

The CoRoT exoplanet science team announces the discovery of CoRoT-11b, a fairly massive hot-Jupiter transiting a V=12.9 mag F6 dwarf star (M*=1.27 +/- 0.05 Msun, R*=1.37 +/- 0.03 Rsun, Teff=6440 +/- 120 K ... [more ▼]

The CoRoT exoplanet science team announces the discovery of CoRoT-11b, a fairly massive hot-Jupiter transiting a V=12.9 mag F6 dwarf star (M*=1.27 +/- 0.05 Msun, R*=1.37 +/- 0.03 Rsun, Teff=6440 +/- 120 K), with an orbital period of P=2.994329 +/- 0.000011 days and semi-major axis a=0.0436 +/- 0.005 AU. The detection of part of the radial velocity anomaly caused by the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect shows that the transit-like events detected by CoRoT are caused by a planet-sized transiting object in a prograde orbit. The relatively high projected rotational velocity of the star (vsini=40+/-5 km/s) places CoRoT-11 among the most rapidly rotating planet host stars discovered so far. With a planetary mass of mp=2.33+/-0.34 Mjup and radius rp=1.43+/-0.03 Rjup, the resulting mean density of CoRoT-11b (rho=0.99+/-0.15 g/cm^3) can be explained with a model for an inflated hydrogen-planet with a solar composition and a high level of energy dissipation in its interior. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. X. CoRoT-10b: a giant planet in a 13.24 day eccentric orbit
Bonomo, A. S.; Santerne, A.; Alonso, R. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 520

Context. The space telescope CoRoT searches for transiting extrasolar planets by continuously monitoring the optical flux of thousands of stars in several fields of view. <BR /> Aims: We report the ... [more ▼]

Context. The space telescope CoRoT searches for transiting extrasolar planets by continuously monitoring the optical flux of thousands of stars in several fields of view. <BR /> Aims: We report the discovery of CoRoT-10b, a giant planet on a highly eccentric orbit (e = 0.53 ± 0.04) revolving in 13.24 days around a faint (V = 15.22) metal-rich K1V star. <BR /> Methods: We used CoRoT photometry, radial velocity observations taken with the HARPS spectrograph, and UVES spectra of the parent star to derive the orbital, stellar, and planetary parameters. <BR /> Results: We derive a radius of the planet of 0.97 ± 0.07 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB] and a mass of 2.75 ± 0.16 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB]. The bulk density, ρ[SUB]p[/SUB] = 3.70 ± 0.83 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP], is ~2.8 that of Jupiter. The core of CoRoT-10b could contain up to 240 M_⊕ of heavy elements. Moving along its eccentric orbit, the planet experiences a 10.6-fold variation in insolation. Owing to the long circularisation time, τ[SUB]circ[/SUB] > 7 Gyr, a resonant perturber is not required to excite and maintain the high eccentricity of CoRoT-10b. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XI. CoRoT-8b: a hot and dense sub-Saturn around a K1 dwarf
Bordé, P.; Bouchy, F.; Deleuil, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 520

<BR /> Aims: We report the discovery of CoRoT-8b, a dense small Saturn-class exoplanet that orbits a K1 dwarf in 6.2 days, and we derive its orbital parameters, mass, and radius. <BR /> Methods: We ... [more ▼]

<BR /> Aims: We report the discovery of CoRoT-8b, a dense small Saturn-class exoplanet that orbits a K1 dwarf in 6.2 days, and we derive its orbital parameters, mass, and radius. <BR /> Methods: We analyzed two complementary data sets: the photometric transit curve of CoRoT-8b as measured by CoRoT and the radial velocity curve of CoRoT-8 as measured by the HARPS spectrometer. <BR /> Results: We find that CoRoT-8b is on a circular orbit with a semi-major axis of 0.063 ± 0.001 AU. It has a radius of 0.57 ± 0.02 R[SUB]J[/SUB], a mass of 0.22 ± 0.03 M[SUB]J[/SUB], and therefore a mean density of 1.6 ± 0.1 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]. <BR /> Conclusions: With 67% of the size of Saturn and 72% of its mass, CoRoT-8b has a density comparable to that of Neptune (1.76 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]). We estimate its content in heavy elements to be 47-63 {M}_⊕, and the mass of its hydrogen-helium envelope to be 7-23 {M}_⊕. At 0.063 AU, the thermal loss of hydrogen of CoRoT-8b should be no more than 0.1% over an assumed integrated lifetime of 3 Ga. Observations made with SOPHIE spectrograph at Observatoire de Haute Provence, France (PNP.07B.MOUT), and the HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (081.C-0388 and 083.C-0186). The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006, has been developed and is operated by the CNES with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brasil, ESA, Germany, and Spain.Both data sets are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/520/A66">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/520/A66</A> [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XII. CoRoT-12b: a short-period low-density planet transiting a solar analog star
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Hatzes, A.; Csizmadia, Szilard et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 520

We report the discovery by the CoRoT satellite of a new transiting giant planet in a 2.83 days orbit about a V = 15.5 solar analog star (M_* = 1.08 ± 0.08 M_ȯ, R_* = 1.1 ± 0.1 R_ȯ, T[SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5675 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery by the CoRoT satellite of a new transiting giant planet in a 2.83 days orbit about a V = 15.5 solar analog star (M_* = 1.08 ± 0.08 M_ȯ, R_* = 1.1 ± 0.1 R_ȯ, T[SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5675 ± 80 K). This new planet, CoRoT-12b, has a mass of 0.92 ± 0.07 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB] and a radius of 1.44 ± 0.13 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]. Its low density can be explained by standard models for irradiated planets. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Program), Germany and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Spitzer search for the transits of HARPS low-mass planets - I. No transit for the super-Earth HD 40307b
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Deming, D.; Demory, B *-O et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 518(A25),

We used Spitzer and its IRAC camera to search for the transit of the super-Earth HD 40307b. The hypothesis that the planet transits could not be firmly discarded from our first photometric monitoring of a ... [more ▼]

We used Spitzer and its IRAC camera to search for the transit of the super-Earth HD 40307b. The hypothesis that the planet transits could not be firmly discarded from our first photometric monitoring of a transit window because of the uncertainty coming from the modeling of the photometric baseline. To obtain a firm result, two more transit windows were observed and a global Bayesian analysis of the three IRAC time series and the HARPS radial velocities was performed. Unfortunately, the hypothesis that the planet transited during the observed phase window is firmly rejected, while the probability that the planet does transit but that the eclipse was missed by our observations is nearly negligible (0.26%). [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-8b: a retrograde transiting planet in a multiple system
Queloz, D.; Anderson, D.; Collier Cameron, A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 517

We report the discovery of WASP-8b, a transiting planet of 2.25 ± 0.08 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB] on a strongly inclined eccentric 8.15-day orbit, moving in a retrograde direction to the rotation of its late-G host ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of WASP-8b, a transiting planet of 2.25 ± 0.08 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB] on a strongly inclined eccentric 8.15-day orbit, moving in a retrograde direction to the rotation of its late-G host star. Evidence is found that the star is in a multiple stellar system with two other companions. The dynamical complexity of the system indicates that it may have experienced secular interactions such as the Kozai mechanism or a formation that differs from the “classical” disc-migration theory. Based on observations made with HARPS spectrograph on the 3.6-m ESO telescope and the EULER Swiss telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile.Radial velocity data are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via <A href="http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/517/L1">http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/517/L1</A> [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-26b: A 1-Jupiter-mass planet around an early-G-type star
Smalley, B.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010)

We report the discovery of WASP-26b, a moderately over-sized Jupiter-mass exoplanet transiting its 11.3-magnitude early-G-type host star (1SWASP J001824.70-151602.3; TYC 5839-876-1) every 2.7566 days. A ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of WASP-26b, a moderately over-sized Jupiter-mass exoplanet transiting its 11.3-magnitude early-G-type host star (1SWASP J001824.70-151602.3; TYC 5839-876-1) every 2.7566 days. A simultaneous fit to transit photometry and radial-velocity measurements yields a planetary mass of 1.02 +/- 0.03 M_Jup and radius of 1.32 +/- 0.08 R_Jup. The host star, WASP-26, has a mass of 1.12 +/- 0.03 M_sun and a radius of 1.34 +/- 0.06 R_sun and is in a visual double with a fainter K-type star. The two stars are at least a common-proper motion pair with a common distance of around 250 +/- 15 pc and an age of 6 +/- 2 Gy. [less ▲]

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See detailA transiting giant planet with a temperature between 250K and 430K
Deeg, H. J.; Moutou, C.; Erikson, A. et al

in Nature (2010), 464

Of the over 400 known exoplanets, there are about 70 planets that transit their central star, a situation that permits the derivation of their basic parameters and facilitates investigations of their ... [more ▼]

Of the over 400 known exoplanets, there are about 70 planets that transit their central star, a situation that permits the derivation of their basic parameters and facilitates investigations of their atmospheres. Some short-period planets, including the first terrestrial exoplanet (CoRoT-7b), have been discovered using a space mission designed to find smaller and more distant planets than can be seen from the ground. Here we report transit observations of CoRoT-9b, which orbits with a period of 95.274days on a low eccentricity of 0.11+/-0.04 around a solar-like star. Its periastron distance of 0.36 astronomical units is by far the largest of all transiting planets, yielding a `temperate' photospheric temperature estimated to be between 250 and 430K. Unlike previously known transiting planets, the present size of CoRoT-9b should not have been affected by tidal heat dissipation processes. Indeed, the planet is found to be well described by standard evolution models with an inferred interior composition consistent with that of Jupiter and Saturn. [less ▲]

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See detailThe CORALIE survey for southern extrasolar planets. XVI. Discovery of a planetary system around HD 147018 and of two long period and massive planets orbiting HD 171238 and HD 204313
Segransan, D.; Udry, S.; Mayor, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 511

We report the detection of a double planetary system around HD 140718 as well as the discovery of two long period and massive planets orbiting HD 171238 and HD 204313. Those discoveries were made with the ... [more ▼]

We report the detection of a double planetary system around HD 140718 as well as the discovery of two long period and massive planets orbiting HD 171238 and HD 204313. Those discoveries were made with the CORALIE Echelle spectrograph mounted on the 1.2-m Euler Swiss telescope located at La Silla Observatory, Chile. The planetary system orbiting the nearby G9 dwarf HD 147018 is composed of an eccentric inner planet (e = 0.47) with twice the mass of Jupiter (2.1 MJup) and with an orbital period of 44.24 days. The outer planet is even more massive (6.6 MJup) with a slightly eccentric orbit (e = 0.13) and a period of 1008 days. The planet orbiting HD 171238 has a minimum mass of 2.6 MJup, a period of 1523 days and an eccentricity of 0.40. It orbits a G8 dwarfs at 2.5 AU. The last planet, <ASTROBJ>HD 204313</ASTROBJ> b, is a 4.0 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB]-planet with a period of 5.3 years and has a low eccentricity (e = 0.13). It orbits a G5 dwarfs at 3.1 AU. The three parent stars are metal rich, which further strengthens the case that massive planets tend to form around metal rich stars. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-17b: an ultra-low density planet in a probable retrograde orbit
Anderson, D. R.; Hellier, C.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2010), 709(1), 159-167

We report the discovery of the transiting giant planet WASP-17b, the least-dense planet currently known. It is 1.6 Saturn masses but 1.5-2 Jupiter radii, giving a density of 6-14 per cent that of Jupiter ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of the transiting giant planet WASP-17b, the least-dense planet currently known. It is 1.6 Saturn masses but 1.5-2 Jupiter radii, giving a density of 6-14 per cent that of Jupiter. WASP-17b is in a 3.7-day orbit around a sub-solar metallicity, V = 11.6, F6 star. Preliminary detection of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect suggests that WASP-17b is in a retrograde orbit (lambda ~ -150 deg), indicative of a violent history involving planet-planet or planet-star scattering. WASP-17b's bloated radius could be due to tidal heating resulting from recent or ongoing tidal circularisation of an eccentric orbit, such as the highly eccentric orbits that typically result from scattering interactions. It will thus be important to determine more precisely the current orbital eccentricity by further high-precision radial velocity measurements or by timing the secondary eclipse, both to reduce the uncertainty on the planet's radius and to test tidal-heating models. Owing to its low surface gravity, WASP-17b's atmosphere has the largest scale height of any known planet, making it a good target for transmission spectroscopy. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-19b: The Shortest Period Transiting Exoplanet Yet Discovered
Hebb, L.; Collier-Cameron, A.; Triaud, A H M J et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2010), 708

We report on the discovery of a new extremely short period transiting extrasolar planet, WASP-19b. The planet has mass M [SUB]pl[/SUB] = 1.15 ± 0.08 M[SUB]J[/SUB] , radius R [SUB]pl[/SUB] = 1.31 ± 0.06 ... [more ▼]

We report on the discovery of a new extremely short period transiting extrasolar planet, WASP-19b. The planet has mass M [SUB]pl[/SUB] = 1.15 ± 0.08 M[SUB]J[/SUB] , radius R [SUB]pl[/SUB] = 1.31 ± 0.06 R[SUB]J[/SUB] , and orbital period P = 0.7888399 ± 0.0000008 days. Through spectroscopic analysis, we determine the host star to be a slightly super-solar metallicity ([M/H] = 0.1 ± 0.1 dex) G-dwarf with T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5500 ± 100 K. In addition, we detect periodic, sinusoidal flux variations in the light curve which are used to derive a rotation period for the star of P [SUB]rot[/SUB] = 10.5 ± 0.2 days. The relatively short stellar rotation period suggests that either WASP-19 is somewhat young (~ 600 Myr old) or tidal interactions between the two bodies have caused the planet to spiral inward over its lifetime resulting in the spin-up of the star. Due to the detection of the rotation period, this system has the potential to place strong constraints on the stellar tidal quality factor, Q'[SUB] s [/SUB], if a more precise age is determined. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in CoRoT-LRc01 field
Cabrera, J.; Fridlund, M.; Ollivier, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

Aims: We present here the list of planetary transit candidates detected in the first long run observed by CoRoT: LRc01, towards the galactic center in the direction of Aquila, which lasted from May to ... [more ▼]

Aims: We present here the list of planetary transit candidates detected in the first long run observed by CoRoT: LRc01, towards the galactic center in the direction of Aquila, which lasted from May to October 2007. <BR />Methods: we analyzed 3719 (33%) sources in the chromatic bands and 7689 in the monochromatic band. Instrumental noise and the stellar variability were treated with several detrending tools, on which subsequently several transit search algorithms were applied. <BR />Results: Forty two sources were classified as planetary transit candidates and up to now 26 cases have been solved. One planet (CoRoT-2b) and one brown-dwarf (CoRoT-3b) have been the subjects of detailed publications. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27 2006, was developed and is operated by CNES, with contributions from Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany and Spain. The first CoRoT data are available to the community from the CoRoT archive: http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr. [less ▲]

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See detailThe CoRoT-7 planetary system: two orbiting super-Earths
Queloz, D.; Bouchy, F.; Moutou, C. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

We report on an intensive observational campaign carried out with HARPS at the 3.6 m telescope at La Silla on the star CoRoT-7. Additional simultaneous photometric measurements carried out with the Euler ... [more ▼]

We report on an intensive observational campaign carried out with HARPS at the 3.6 m telescope at La Silla on the star CoRoT-7. Additional simultaneous photometric measurements carried out with the Euler Swiss telescope have demonstrated that the observed radial velocity variations are dominated by rotational modulation from cool spots on the stellar surface. Several approaches were used to extract the radial velocity signal of the planet(s) from the stellar activity signal. First, a simple pre-whitening procedure was employed to find and subsequently remove periodic signals from the complex frequency structure of the radial velocity data. The dominant frequency in the power spectrum was found at 23 days, which corresponds to the rotation period of CoRoT-7. The 0.8535 day period of CoRoT-7b planetary candidate was detected with an amplitude of 3.3 m s[SUP]-1[/SUP]. Most other frequencies, some with amplitudes larger than the CoRoT-7b signal, are most likely associated with activity. A second approach used harmonic decomposition of the rotational period and up to the first three harmonics to filter out the activity signal from radial velocity variations caused by orbiting planets. After correcting the radial velocity data for activity, two periodic signals are detected: the CoRoT-7b transit period and a second one with a period of 3.69 days and an amplitude of 4 m s[SUP]-1[/SUP]. This second signal was also found in the pre-whitening analysis. We attribute the second signal to a second, more remote planet CoRoT-7c . The orbital solution of both planets is compatible with circular orbits. The mass of CoRoT-7b is 4.8±0.8 (M[SUB]â [/SUB]) and that of CoRoT-7c is 8.4± 0.9 (M[SUB]â [/SUB]), assuming both planets are on coplanar orbits. We also investigated the false positive scenario of a blend by a faint stellar binary, and this may be rejected by the stability of the bisector on a nightly scale. According to their masses both planets belong to the super-Earth planet category. The average density of CoRoT-7b is Ï =5.6± 1.3 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP], similar to the Earth. The CoRoT-7 planetary system provides us with the first insight into the physical nature of short period super-Earth planets recently detected by radial velocity surveys. These planets may be denser than Neptune and therefore likely made of rocks like the Earth, or a mix of water ice and rocks. Based on observations made with HARPS spectrograph on the 3.6-m ESO telescope and the EULER Swiss telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile. The HARPS results presented in this paper (Appendix A) are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org and at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/506/303 [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in the CoRoT initial run: resolving their nature
Moutou, C.; Pont, F.; Bouchy, F. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

With the release of CoRoT lightcurves of the Initial Run IRa01, 50 transiting planetary candidates have been published in a companion paper. About twenty of them were identified as binary stars from the ... [more ▼]

With the release of CoRoT lightcurves of the Initial Run IRa01, 50 transiting planetary candidates have been published in a companion paper. About twenty of them were identified as binary stars from the CoRoT lightcurve itself. Complementary observations were conducted for 29 candidates, including ground-based photometry and radial-velocity measurements. Two giant planets were identified and fully characterized. Nineteen binaries are recognized, from which 10 are background eclipsing binaries in the CoRoT mask or triple systems, diluted by the main CoRoT target. Eight cases remain of unclear origin, one of them still being a planetary candidate. Comparison with simulations shows that the actual threshold of confirmed planet detection in this field does not yet fulfill the expectations, and a number of reasons are invoked, like the ranking process based on lightcurve analyses, and the strategy and limits of follow-up observations for targets fainter than magnitude 15. Based on data obtained at Observatoire de Haute Provence with SOPHIE and with HARPS on the ESO 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil , ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. Tables 2 to 13, 15 to 17 and Figs. 4 to 7 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-16b: A New Jupiter-Like Planet Transiting a Southern Solar Analog
Lister, T. A.; Anderson, D. R.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2009), 703

We report the discovery from WASP-South of a new Jupiter-like extrasolar planet, WASP-16b, which transits its solar analog host star every 3.12 days. Analysis of the transit photometry and radial velocity ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery from WASP-South of a new Jupiter-like extrasolar planet, WASP-16b, which transits its solar analog host star every 3.12 days. Analysis of the transit photometry and radial velocity spectroscopic data leads to a planet with R [SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.008 ± 0.071 R [SUB]Jup[/SUB] and M [SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.855 ± 0.059 M [SUB]Jup[/SUB], orbiting a host star with R [SUB]*[/SUB] = 0.946 ± 0.054 R [SUB]sun[/SUB] and M [SUB]*[/SUB] = 1.022 ± 0.101 M [SUB]sun[/SUB]. Comparison of the high resolution stellar spectrum with synthetic spectra and stellar evolution models indicates the host star is a near-solar metallicity ([Fe/H] =0.01 ± 0.10) solar analog (T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5700 ± 150 K and log g = 4.5 ± 0.2) of intermediate age (tau = 2.3[SUP]+5.8[/SUP] [SUB]--2.2[/SUB] Gyr). [less ▲]

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See detailAn orbital period of 0.94days for the hot-Jupiter planet WASP-18b
Hellier, Coel; Anderson, D. R.; Cameron, A Collier et al

in Nature (2009), 460

The `hot Jupiters' that abound in lists of known extrasolar planets are thought to have formed far from their host stars, but migrate inwards through interactions with the proto-planetary disk from which ... [more ▼]

The `hot Jupiters' that abound in lists of known extrasolar planets are thought to have formed far from their host stars, but migrate inwards through interactions with the proto-planetary disk from which they were born, or by an alternative mechanism such as planet-planet scattering. The hot Jupiters closest to their parent stars, at orbital distances of only ~0.02 astronomical units, have strong tidal interactions, and systems such as OGLE-TR-56 have been suggested as tests of tidal dissipation theory. Here we report the discovery of planet WASP-18b with an orbital period of 0.94days and a mass of ten Jupiter masses (10M[SUB]Jup[/SUB]), resulting in a tidal interaction an order of magnitude stronger than that of planet OGLE-TR-56b. Under the assumption that the tidal-dissipation parameter Q of the host star is of the order of 10[SUP]6[/SUP], as measured for Solar System bodies and binary stars and as often applied to extrasolar planets, WASP-18b will be spiralling inwards on a timescale less than a thousandth that of the lifetime of its host star. Therefore either WASP-18 is in a rare, exceptionally short-lived state, or the tidal dissipation in this system (and possibly other hot-Jupiter systems) must be much weaker than in the Solar System. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscovery and characterization of WASP-6b, an inflated sub-Jupiter mass planet transiting a solar-type star
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Anderson, D. R.; Triaud, A H M J et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 501

We report the discovery of WASP-6b, an inflated sub-Jupiter mass planet transiting every 3.3610060[SUP]+ 0.0000022 [/SUP][SUB]- 0.0000035 [/SUB] days a mildly metal-poor solar-type star of magnitude V ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of WASP-6b, an inflated sub-Jupiter mass planet transiting every 3.3610060[SUP]+ 0.0000022 [/SUP][SUB]- 0.0000035 [/SUB] days a mildly metal-poor solar-type star of magnitude V = 11.9. A combined analysis of the WASP photometry, high-precision followup transit photometry and radial velocities yield a planetary mass M[SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.503[SUP]+0.019[/SUP][SUB]-0.038[/SUB] M[SUB]J[/SUB] and radius R[SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.224[SUP]+0.051[/SUP][SUB]-0.052[/SUB] R_J, resulting in a density rho[SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.27 ± 0.05 rho_J. The mass and radius for the host star are M_ast = 0.88[SUP]+0.05[/SUP][SUB]-0.08[/SUB] M_o and R_ast = 0.870[SUP]+0.025[/SUP][SUB]-0.036[/SUB] R_o. The non-zero orbital eccentricity e = 0.054^+0.018[SUB]-0.015[/SUB] that we measure suggests that the planet underwent a massive tidal heating 1 Gyr ago that could have contributed to its inflated radius. High-precision radial velocities obtained during a transit allow us to measure a sky-projected angle between the stellar spin and orbital axis beta = 11[SUP]+14[/SUP][SUB]-18[/SUB] deg. In addition to similar published measurements, this result favors a dominant migration mechanism based on tidal interactions with a protoplanetary disk. Based on data collected with the HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory in the programs 082.C-0040(E) and 082.C-0608. The photometric time-series and radial velocities (Tables 4, 5) used in this work are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/501/785 [less ▲]

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