References of "Peigneux, Philippe"
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See detailThe role of sleep in the consolidation of emotional memories in humans : a fMRI study
Sterpenich, Virginie; Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

Poster (2006)

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See detailEarly boost and slow consolidation in motor skill learning
Hotermans, C.; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Maertens De Noordhout, Alain ULg et al

in Learning & Memory (Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.) (2006), 13(5, Sep-Oct), 580-583

Motorskill learning is a dynamic process that continues covertly after training has ended and eventually leads to delayed increments in performance. Current theories Suggest that this off-line improvement ... [more ▼]

Motorskill learning is a dynamic process that continues covertly after training has ended and eventually leads to delayed increments in performance. Current theories Suggest that this off-line improvement takes time and appears only after several hours. Here we show an early transient and short-lived boost in performance, emerging as early as 5-30 min after training but no longer observed 4 h later. This early boost is predictive of the performance achieved 48 h later, Suggesting its functional relevance for memory processes. [less ▲]

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See detailA role for sleep in brain plasticity.
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Pediatric Rehabilitation (2006), 9(2), 98-118

The idea that sleep might be involved in brain plasticity has been investigated for many years through a large number of animal and human studies, but evidence remains fragmentary. Large amounts of sleep ... [more ▼]

The idea that sleep might be involved in brain plasticity has been investigated for many years through a large number of animal and human studies, but evidence remains fragmentary. Large amounts of sleep in early life suggest that sleep may play a role in brain maturation. In particular, the influence of sleep in developing the visual system has been highlighted. The current data suggest that both Rapid Eye Movement (REM) and non-REM sleep states would be important for brain development. Such findings stress the need for optimal paediatric sleep management. In the adult brain, the role of sleep in learning and memory is emphasized by studies at behavioural, systems, cellular and molecular levels. First, sleep amounts are reported to increase following a learning task and sleep deprivation impairs task acquisition and consolidation. At the systems level, neurophysiological studies suggest possible mechanisms for the consolidation of memory traces. These imply both thalamocortical and hippocampo-neocortical networks. Similarly, neuroimaging techniques demonstrated the experience-dependent changes in cerebral activity during sleep. Finally, recent works show the modulation during sleep of cerebral protein synthesis and expression of genes involved in neuronal plasticity. [less ▲]

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See detailA prominent role for amygdaloid complexes in the Variability in Heart Rate (VHR) during Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep relative to wakefulness.
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2006), 32(3), 1008-1015

Rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) is associated with intense neuronal activity, rapid eye movements, muscular atonia and dreaming. Another important feature in REMS is the instability in autonomic ... [more ▼]

Rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) is associated with intense neuronal activity, rapid eye movements, muscular atonia and dreaming. Another important feature in REMS is the instability in autonomic, especially in cardiovascular regulation. The neural mechanisms underpinning the variability in heart rate (VHR) during REMS are not known in detail, especially in humans. During wakefulness, the right insula has frequently been reported as involved in cardiovascular regulation but this might not be the case during REMS. We aimed at characterizing the neural correlates of VHR during REMS as compared to wakefulness and to slow wave sleep (SWS), the other main component of human sleep, in normal young adults, based on the statistical analysis of a set of (H2O)-O-15 positron emission tomography (PET) sleep data acquired during SWS, REMS and wakefulness. The results showed that VHR correlated more tightly during REMS than during wakefulness with the rCBF in the right amygdaloid complex. Moreover, we assessed whether functional relationships between amygdala and any brain area changed depending the state of vigilance. Only the activity within in the insula was found to covary with the amygdala, significantly more tightly during wakefulness than during REMS in relation to the VHR. The functional connectivity between the amygdala and the insular cortex, two brain areas involved in cardiovascular regulation, differs significantly in REMS as compared to wakefulness. This suggests a functional reorganization of central cardiovascular regulation during REMS. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDaytime light exposure dynamically enhances brain responses.
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg et al

in Current Biology (2006), 16(16), 1616-21

In humans, light enhances both alertness and performance during nighttime and daytime [1-4] and influences regional brain function [5]. These effects do not correspond to classical visual responses but ... [more ▼]

In humans, light enhances both alertness and performance during nighttime and daytime [1-4] and influences regional brain function [5]. These effects do not correspond to classical visual responses but involve a non-image forming (NIF) system, which elicits greater endocrine, physiological, neurophysiological, and behavioral responses to shorter light wavelengths than to wavelengths geared toward the visual system [6-11]. During daytime, the neural changes induced by light exposure, and their time courses, are largely unknown. With functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we characterized the neural correlates of the alerting effect of daytime light by assessing the responses to an auditory oddball task [12-15], before and after a short exposure to a bright white light. Light-induced improvement in subjective alertness was linearly related to responses in the posterior thalamus. In addition, light enhanced responses in a set of cortical areas supporting attentional oddball effects, and it prevented decreases of activity otherwise observed during continuous darkness. Responses to light were remarkably dynamic. They declined within minutes after the end of the light stimulus, following various region-specific time courses. These findings suggest that light can modulate activity of subcortical structures involved in alertness, thereby dynamically promoting cortical activity in networks involved in ongoing nonvisual cognitive processes. [less ▲]

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See detailA Prominent Role for Amygdaloïd Complexes in the Variability of Heart Rate during Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Sleep
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thanh; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2005), 26(Suppl. 1),

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See detailNeural correlates of fast and slow ocular sequence learning
Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Ruby, Perrine; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2005), 26(Suppl. 1),

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See detailTime-of-day modulations of rCBF response in functional brain imaging studies: a meta-analysis
Schmidt, Christina; Dang Vu, Thanh; Orban, Pierre et al

in NeuroImage (2005), 26(Suppl. 1),

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See detailBrain imaging on passing to sleep
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Sterpenich, Virginie ULg; Albouy, Geneviève ULg et al

in Parmeggiani, Pier Luigi; Velluti, Ricardo (Eds.) The physiologic nature of sleep (2005)

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See detailNeural mechanisms involved in the detection of our first name : A combined ERPs and PET study
Perrin, Fabien; Maquet, Pierre ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Neuropsychologia (2005), 43(1), 12-19

In everyday social interactions, hearing our own first name captures our attention and gives rise to a sense of self-awareness, since it is one of the most socially self related stimulus. In the present ... [more ▼]

In everyday social interactions, hearing our own first name captures our attention and gives rise to a sense of self-awareness, since it is one of the most socially self related stimulus. In the present study, we combined ERPs and PET scan methods to explore the cerebral mechanisms underlying the detection of our own name. While categorical analyses of PET data failed to reveal significant results, we found that the amplitude of the P3 component, elicited when hearing one's own name, correlates with regional cerebral blood changes in right superior temporal sulcus, precuneus and medial prefrontal cortex. Additionally, the latter was more correlated to the P3 obtained for the subject's name compared to that obtained for other first names. These results suggest that the medial prefrontal cortex plays the most prominent role in self-processing. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in severely brain injured patients: Differences between VS and MCS
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (2005), 15(3-4, Jul-Sep), 283-289

We review cerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in minimally conscious state (MCS) and vegetative state (VS) patients. In contrast with limited brain activation found in VS patients, MCS ... [more ▼]

We review cerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in minimally conscious state (MCS) and vegetative state (VS) patients. In contrast with limited brain activation found in VS patients, MCS patients show activation similar to controls in response to auditory, emotional and noxious stimuli. Despite an apparent clinical similarity between MCS and VS patients, functional imaging data show striking differences in cortical segregation and integration between these two conditions. However, in the absence of a generally accepted neural correlate of consciousness as measured by functional neuroirnaging, clinical assessment remains the gold standard for the evaluation and management of severely brain damaged patients. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral correlates of delta waves during non-REM sleep revisited.
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2005), 28(1), 14-21

We aimed at characterizing the neural correlates of delta activity during Non Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep in non-sleep-deprived normal young adults, based on the statistical analysis of a positron ... [more ▼]

We aimed at characterizing the neural correlates of delta activity during Non Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep in non-sleep-deprived normal young adults, based on the statistical analysis of a positron emission tomography (PET) sleep data set. One hundred fifteen PET scans were obtained using H(2)(15)O under continuous polygraphic monitoring during stages 2-4 of NREM sleep. Correlations between regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and delta power (1.5-4 Hz) spectral density were analyzed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM2). Delta power values obtained at central scalp locations negatively correlated during NREM sleep with rCBF in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the basal forebrain, the striatum, the anterior insula, and the precuneus. These regions embrace the set of brain areas in which rCBF decreases during slow wave sleep (SWS) as compared to Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep and wakefulness (Maquet, P., Degueldre, C., Delfiore, G., Aerts, J., Peters, J.M., Luxen, A., Franck, G., 1997. Functional neuroanatomy of human slow wave sleep. J. Neurosci. 17, 2807-S2812), supporting the notion that delta activity is a valuable prominent feature of NREM sleep. A strong association was observed between rCBF in the ventromedial prefrontal regions and delta power, in agreement with electrophysiological studies. In contrast to the results of a previous PET study investigating the brain correlates of delta activity (Hofle, N., Paus, T., Reutens, D., Fiset, P., Gotman, J., Evans, A.C., Jones, B.E., 1997. Regional cerebral blood flow changes as a function of delta and spindle activity during slow wave sleep in humans. J. Neurosci. 17, 4800-4808), in which waking scans were mixed with NREM sleep scans, no correlation was found with thalamus activity. This latter result stresses the importance of an extra-thalamic delta rhythm among the synchronous NREM sleep oscillations. Consequently, this rCBF distribution might preferentially reflect a particular modulation of the cellular processes involved in the generation of cortical delta waves during NREM sleep. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman cognition during REM sleep and the activity profile within frontal and parietal cortices: a reappraisal of functional neuroimaging data
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Ruby, P.; Maudoux, Audrey ULg et al

in Progress in Brain Research (2005), 150(Boundaries of Consciousness: Neurobiology and Neuropathology), 219-227

In this chapter, we aimed at further characterizing the functional neuroanatomy of the human rapid eye movement (REM) sleep at the population level. We carried out a meta-analysis of a large dataset of ... [more ▼]

In this chapter, we aimed at further characterizing the functional neuroanatomy of the human rapid eye movement (REM) sleep at the population level. We carried out a meta-analysis of a large dataset of positron emission tomography (PET) scans acquired during wakefulness, slow wave sleep and REM sleep, and focused especially on the brain areas in which the activity diminishes during REM sleep. Results show that quiescent regions are confined to the inferior and middle frontal cortex and to the inferior parietal lobule. Providing a plausible explanation for some of the features of dream reports, these findings may help in refining the concepts, which try to account for human cognition during REM sleep. In particular, we discuss the significance of these results to explain the alteration in executive processes, episodic memory retrieval and self representation during REM sleep dreaming as well as the incorporation of external stimuli into the dream narrative. [less ▲]

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See detailAre spatial memories strengthened in the human hippocampus during slow wave sleep?
Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg; Fuchs, Sonia et al

in Neuron (2004), 44(3), 535-545

In rats, the firing sequences observed in hippocampal ensembles during spatial learning are replayed during subsequent sleep, suggesting a role for posttraining sleep periods in the offline processing of ... [more ▼]

In rats, the firing sequences observed in hippocampal ensembles during spatial learning are replayed during subsequent sleep, suggesting a role for posttraining sleep periods in the offline processing of spatial memories. Here, using regional cerebral blood flow measurements, we show that, in humans, hippocampal areas that are activated during route learning in a virtual town are likewise activated during subsequent slow wave sleep. Most importantly, we found that the amount of hippocampal activity expressed during slow wave sleep positively correlates with the improvement of performance in route retrieval on the next day. These findings suggest that learning-dependent modulation in hippocampal activity during human sleep reflects the offline processing of recent episodic and spatial memory traces, which eventually leads to the plastic changes underlying the subsequent improvement in performance. [less ▲]

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See detailRegional organisation of brain activity during paradoxical sleep (PS)
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Ruby, P.; Schwartz, S. et al

in Archives Italiennes de Biologie (2004), 142(4), 413-419

Human brain function is regionally organised during paradoxical sleep (PS) in a very different way than during wakefulness or slow wave sleep. The important activity in the pons and in the limbic ... [more ▼]

Human brain function is regionally organised during paradoxical sleep (PS) in a very different way than during wakefulness or slow wave sleep. The important activity in the pons and in the limbic/paralimbic areas constitutes the key feature of the functional neuroanatomy of PS, together with a relative quiescence of prefrontal and parietal associative cortices. Two questions are still outstanding. What neurocognitive and neurophysiological mechanisms may explain this original organization of brain function during PS? How the pattern of regional brain function may relate to dream content? Although some clues are already available, the experimental answer to both questions is still pending. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging a cognitive model of apraxia: The neural substrate of gesture-specific cognitive processes
Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Garraux, Gaëtan ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2004), 21(3), 119-142

The present study aimed to ascertain the neuroanatomical basis of an influential neuropsychological model for upper limb apraxia [Rothi LJ, et al. The Neuropsychology of Action. 1997. Hove, UK: Psychology ... [more ▼]

The present study aimed to ascertain the neuroanatomical basis of an influential neuropsychological model for upper limb apraxia [Rothi LJ, et al. The Neuropsychology of Action. 1997. Hove, UK: Psychology Press]. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured in healthy volunteers using (H2O)-O-15 PET during performance of four tasks commonly used for testing upper limb apraxia, i.e., pantomime of familiar gestures on verbal command, imitation of familiar gestures, imitation of novel gestures, and an action-semantic task that consisted in matching objects for functional use. We also re-analysed data from a previous PET study in which we investigated the neural basis. of the visual analysis of gestures. First; we found that two sets of discrete brain areas are predominantly engaged in the imitation of familiar and novel gestures, respectively. Segregated brain activation for novel gesture mutation concur with neuropsychological reports to support the hypothesis that knowledge about the organization of the human body mediates the transition from visual perception to motor execution when imitating novel gestures [Goldenberg Neuropsychologia 1995;35.63-72]. Second, conjunction analyses revealed distinctive neural bases for most of the gesture-specific cognitive processes proposed in this cognitive model of upper limb apraxia. However, a functional analysis of brain imaging data suggested that one single memory store may be used for "to be-perceived" and "to-be-produced" gestural representations, departing from Rothi et al.'s proposal. Based on the above considerations, we suggest and discuss a revised model for upper limb apraxia that might best account for both brain imaging findings and neuropsychological dissociations reported in the apraxia literature. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailMemory processing during sleep: mechanisms and evidence from neuroimaging studies
Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Melchior, Gwenaelle; Schmidt, Christina ULg et al

in Psychologica Belgica (2004), 44(1-2), 121-142

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