References of "Peigneux, Philippe"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSleep transforms the cerebral trace of declarative memories
Gais, Steffen; Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2007), 104(47), 18778-18783

After encoding, memory traces are initially fragile and have to be reinforced to become permanent. The initial steps of this process occur at a cellular level within minutes or hours. Besides this rapid ... [more ▼]

After encoding, memory traces are initially fragile and have to be reinforced to become permanent. The initial steps of this process occur at a cellular level within minutes or hours. Besides this rapid synaptic consolidation, systems consolidation occurs within a time frame of days to years. For declarative memory, the latter is presumed to rely on an interaction between different brain regions, in particular the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Specifically, sleep has been proposed to provide a setting that supports such systems consolidation processes, leading to a transfer and perhaps transformation of memories. Using functional MRI, we show that postlearning sleep enhances hippocampal responses during recall of word pairs 48 h after learning, indicating intrahippocampal memory processing during sleep. At the same time, sleep induces a memory-related functional connectivity between the hippocampus and the mPFC. Six months after learning, memories activated the mPFC more strongly when they were encoded before sleep, showing that sleep leads to long-lasting changes in the representation of memories on a systems level. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTask-related interaction between basal ganglia and cortical dopamine release.
Garraux, Gaëtan ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Carson, Richard E et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2007), 27(52), 14434-41

Dopamine (DA) is a powerful neuromodulator for a wide variety of behaviors. Considerable evidence accumulated from rodent and monkey experiments over the last two decades suggests that DA activity in the ... [more ▼]

Dopamine (DA) is a powerful neuromodulator for a wide variety of behaviors. Considerable evidence accumulated from rodent and monkey experiments over the last two decades suggests that DA activity in the frontal cortex is reciprocally linked to that in functionally related basal ganglia (BG) structures. However, the functional importance of this in humans is still unknown. To address this issue, we measured endogenous DA release using positron emission tomography in 15 healthy subjects as they practiced the first training session of a finger sequence learning task. Significant results were observed not only in striatal areas but also in extrastriatal "motor" regions, bilaterally. Faster learning was specifically coupled to lower DA release in the sensorimotor part of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) contralateral to the moving hand, which was paralleled by a higher increase in DA levels in the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA). This finding provides original evidence supporting a motor-learning-related interaction between DA release in left GPi and pre-SMA, a mechanism that may also apply to other anatomically and functionally interconnected BG and frontal cortical areas as a function of behavior. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe role of sleep in motor memory consolidation assessed by fMRI
Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Sterpenich, Virginie ULg; Darsaud, A. et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2006, September), 15(Suppl. 1), 189

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSleep-dependent changes in brain activity subserving human navigation
Rauchs, G.; Orban, Pierre ULg; Schmidt, Christina ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2006, September), 15(Suppl. 1), 189-190

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEncoding Difficulty Promotes Postlearning Changes in Sleep
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2006), 26(35), 8976-8982

Learning-dependent increases in sleep spindle density have been reported during nocturnal sleep immediately after the learning session. Here, we investigated experience-dependent changes in daytime sleep ... [more ▼]

Learning-dependent increases in sleep spindle density have been reported during nocturnal sleep immediately after the learning session. Here, we investigated experience-dependent changes in daytime sleep EEG activity after declarative learning of unrelated word pairs. At weekly intervals, 13 young male volunteers spent three 24 h sessions in the laboratory under carefully controlled homeostatic and circadian conditions. At approximately midday, subjects performed either one of two word-pair learning tasks or a matched nonlearning control task, in a counterbalanced order. The two learning lists differed in the level of concreteness of the words used, resulting in an easier and a more difficult associative encoding condition, as confirmed by performance at immediate cued recall. Subjects were then allowed to sleep for 4 h; afterward, delayed cued recall was tested. Compared with the control condition, sleep EEG spectral activity in the low spindle frequency range and the density of low-frequency sleep spindles (11.25–13.75 Hz) were both significantly increased in the left frontal cortex after the difficult but not after the easy encoding condition. Furthermore, we found positive correlations between theseEEG changes during sleep and changes in memory performance between pre nap and post-nap recall sessions. These results indicate that, like during nocturnal sleep, daytime sleep EEG oscillations including spindle activity are modified after declarative learning of word pairs. Furthermore, we demonstrate here that the nature of the learning material is a determinant factor for sleep-related alterations after declarative learning. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImplicit oculomotor sequence learning in humans: Time course of offline processing
Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Ruby, P.; Phillips, Christophe ULg et al

in Brain Research (2006), 1090

Studies of manual and digital sequence learning indicate that motor memories continue to be processed after training has ended, following a succession of identifiable steps. However, it is not known ... [more ▼]

Studies of manual and digital sequence learning indicate that motor memories continue to be processed after training has ended, following a succession of identifiable steps. However, it is not known whether this offline memory processing constitutes a basic feature of motor learning and generalizes to the implicit learning of a sequence of eye movements. To assess this hypothesis, we have created the serial oculomotor reaction time task (SORT). Participants were trained to the SORT then tested after either 30 min, 5 h or 24 h. During training, ocular reaction times decreased monotonically over practice of a repeated sequence, then increased when a different sequence was displayed, demonstrating oculomotor learning of the trained sequence. When tested 30 min after training, a significant gain in oculomotor performance was observed irrespective of the sequence learning. This gain was no longer present after 5 h. Remarkably, a gain in performance specific to the learned sequence emerged only 24 h after training. After testing, a generation task confirmed that most subjects learned implicitly the regularities of the sequence. Our results show that, as for manual or digital sequences, oculomotor sequences can be implicitly learned. The offline processing of oculomotor memories follows distinct stages in a way similar to those observed after manual or digital sequence learning. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSleep after spatial learning promotes covert reorganization of brain activity
Orban, Pierre ULg; Rauchs, Géraldine; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2006), 103(18), 7124-7129

Sleep promotes the integration of recently acquired spatial memories into cerebral networks for the long term. In this study, we examined how sleep deprivation hinders this consolidation process. Using ... [more ▼]

Sleep promotes the integration of recently acquired spatial memories into cerebral networks for the long term. In this study, we examined how sleep deprivation hinders this consolidation process. Using functional MRI, we mapped regional cerebral activity during place-finding navigation in a virtual town, immediately after learning and 3 days later, in subjects either allowed regular sleep (RS) or totally sleep-deprived (TSD) on the first posttraining night. At immediate and delayed retrieval, place-finding navigation elicited increased brain activity in an extended hippocamponeocortical network in both RS and TSD subjects. Behavioral performance was equivalent between groups. However, striatal navigation-related activity increased more at delayed retrieval in RS than in TSD subjects. Furthermore, correlations between striatal response and behavioral performance, as well as functional connectivity between the striatum and the hippocampus, were modulated by posttraining sleep. These data suggest that brain activity is restructured during sleep in such a way that navigation in the virtual environment, initially related to a hippocampus-dependent spatial strategy, becomes progressively contingent in part on a response-based strategy mediated by the striatum. Both neural strategies eventually relate to equivalent performance levels, indicating that covert reorganization of brain patterns underlying navigation after sleep is not necessarily accompanied by overt changes in behavior. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOffline persistence of memory-related cerebral activity during active wakefulness
Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Orban, Pierre ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in PLoS Biology (2006), 4(4), 100

Much remains to be discovered about the fate of recent memories in the human brain. Several studies have reported the reactivation of learning-related cerebral activity during post-training sleep ... [more ▼]

Much remains to be discovered about the fate of recent memories in the human brain. Several studies have reported the reactivation of learning-related cerebral activity during post-training sleep, suggesting that sleep plays a role in the offline processing and consolidation of memory. However, little is known about how new information is maintained and processed during post-training wakefulness before sleep, while the brain is actively engaged in other cognitive activities. We show, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, that brain activity elicited during a new learning episode modulates brain responses to an unrelated cognitive task, during the waking period following the end of training. This post-training activity evolves in learning-related cerebral structures, in which functional connections with other brain regions are gradually established or reinforced. It also correlates with behavioral performance. These processes follow a different time course for hippocampus-dependent and hippocampus-independent memories. Our experimental approach allowed the characterization of the offline evolution of the cerebral correlates of recent memories, without the confounding effect of concurrent practice of the learned material. Results indicate that the human brain has already extensively processed recent memories during the first hours of post-training wakefulness, even when simultaneously coping with unrelated cognitive demands. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (10 ULg)
See detailTime course of oculomotor sequence learning during the first 24 hours assessed by fMRI.
Albouy, G.; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Sterpenich, V. et al

Poster (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)
See detailThe role of sleep in the consolidation of emotional memories W
Sterpenich, V.; Albouy, G.; Boly, M. et al

Poster (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHippocampal response at training promotes insight after sleep
Darsaud, Annabelle; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2006), 31(Suppl. 1),

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe role of sleep in the consolidation of emotional memories in humans : a fMRI study
Sterpenich, Virginie; Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

Poster (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEarly boost and slow consolidation in motor skill learning
Hotermans, C.; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Maertens De Noordhout, Alain ULg et al

in Learning & Memory (Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.) (2006), 13(5, Sep-Oct), 580-583

Motorskill learning is a dynamic process that continues covertly after training has ended and eventually leads to delayed increments in performance. Current theories Suggest that this off-line improvement ... [more ▼]

Motorskill learning is a dynamic process that continues covertly after training has ended and eventually leads to delayed increments in performance. Current theories Suggest that this off-line improvement takes time and appears only after several hours. Here we show an early transient and short-lived boost in performance, emerging as early as 5-30 min after training but no longer observed 4 h later. This early boost is predictive of the performance achieved 48 h later, Suggesting its functional relevance for memory processes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA role for sleep in brain plasticity.
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Pediatric Rehabilitation (2006), 9(2), 98-118

The idea that sleep might be involved in brain plasticity has been investigated for many years through a large number of animal and human studies, but evidence remains fragmentary. Large amounts of sleep ... [more ▼]

The idea that sleep might be involved in brain plasticity has been investigated for many years through a large number of animal and human studies, but evidence remains fragmentary. Large amounts of sleep in early life suggest that sleep may play a role in brain maturation. In particular, the influence of sleep in developing the visual system has been highlighted. The current data suggest that both Rapid Eye Movement (REM) and non-REM sleep states would be important for brain development. Such findings stress the need for optimal paediatric sleep management. In the adult brain, the role of sleep in learning and memory is emphasized by studies at behavioural, systems, cellular and molecular levels. First, sleep amounts are reported to increase following a learning task and sleep deprivation impairs task acquisition and consolidation. At the systems level, neurophysiological studies suggest possible mechanisms for the consolidation of memory traces. These imply both thalamocortical and hippocampo-neocortical networks. Similarly, neuroimaging techniques demonstrated the experience-dependent changes in cerebral activity during sleep. Finally, recent works show the modulation during sleep of cerebral protein synthesis and expression of genes involved in neuronal plasticity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA prominent role for amygdaloid complexes in the Variability in Heart Rate (VHR) during Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep relative to wakefulness.
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2006), 32(3), 1008-1015

Rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) is associated with intense neuronal activity, rapid eye movements, muscular atonia and dreaming. Another important feature in REMS is the instability in autonomic ... [more ▼]

Rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) is associated with intense neuronal activity, rapid eye movements, muscular atonia and dreaming. Another important feature in REMS is the instability in autonomic, especially in cardiovascular regulation. The neural mechanisms underpinning the variability in heart rate (VHR) during REMS are not known in detail, especially in humans. During wakefulness, the right insula has frequently been reported as involved in cardiovascular regulation but this might not be the case during REMS. We aimed at characterizing the neural correlates of VHR during REMS as compared to wakefulness and to slow wave sleep (SWS), the other main component of human sleep, in normal young adults, based on the statistical analysis of a set of (H2O)-O-15 positron emission tomography (PET) sleep data acquired during SWS, REMS and wakefulness. The results showed that VHR correlated more tightly during REMS than during wakefulness with the rCBF in the right amygdaloid complex. Moreover, we assessed whether functional relationships between amygdala and any brain area changed depending the state of vigilance. Only the activity within in the insula was found to covary with the amygdala, significantly more tightly during wakefulness than during REMS in relation to the VHR. The functional connectivity between the amygdala and the insular cortex, two brain areas involved in cardiovascular regulation, differs significantly in REMS as compared to wakefulness. This suggests a functional reorganization of central cardiovascular regulation during REMS. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDaytime light exposure dynamically enhances brain responses.
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg et al

in Current Biology (2006), 16(16), 1616-21

In humans, light enhances both alertness and performance during nighttime and daytime [1-4] and influences regional brain function [5]. These effects do not correspond to classical visual responses but ... [more ▼]

In humans, light enhances both alertness and performance during nighttime and daytime [1-4] and influences regional brain function [5]. These effects do not correspond to classical visual responses but involve a non-image forming (NIF) system, which elicits greater endocrine, physiological, neurophysiological, and behavioral responses to shorter light wavelengths than to wavelengths geared toward the visual system [6-11]. During daytime, the neural changes induced by light exposure, and their time courses, are largely unknown. With functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we characterized the neural correlates of the alerting effect of daytime light by assessing the responses to an auditory oddball task [12-15], before and after a short exposure to a bright white light. Light-induced improvement in subjective alertness was linearly related to responses in the posterior thalamus. In addition, light enhanced responses in a set of cortical areas supporting attentional oddball effects, and it prevented decreases of activity otherwise observed during continuous darkness. Responses to light were remarkably dynamic. They declined within minutes after the end of the light stimulus, following various region-specific time courses. These findings suggest that light can modulate activity of subcortical structures involved in alertness, thereby dynamically promoting cortical activity in networks involved in ongoing nonvisual cognitive processes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (4 ULg)