References of "Pastoret, Paul-Pierre"
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See detailEtablissement d'un plan volontaire de contrôle de la rhinotrachéite infectieuse bovine en région wallonne de Belgique
De Wergifosse, Bertrand; Lemaire, Mylène; Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULg et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (1997), 141

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See detailLe rôle de la vaccination dans la prévention des maladies respiratoires d'origine virale chez les bovins
Thiry, Etienne ULg; Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULg; Dispas, Marc et al

in Les troubles respiratoires des bovins, synthèse à partir de cas concrets (1997)

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See detailLes différents vaccins disponibles contre la rhinotrachéite infectieuse bovine
Thiry, Etienne ULg; Lemaire, Mylène; Schynts, Frédéric et al

in Bulletin des Groupements Techniques Vétérinaires (1997), 4B

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See detailBovine herpesvirus type 4. In Lymphotropicherpesviruses: Epstein-Barr virus and Human herpesvirus 8
Thiry, Etienne ULg; Lomonte, P.; Vanderplasschen, Alain ULg et al

in International Agency for research on cancer (1997)

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See detailSequence Analysis of the Bovine Herpesvirus Type 1 Genes Homologous to the DNA Polymerase (Ul30), the Major DNA-Binding Protein (Ul29) and Icp18.5 Assembly Protein (Ul28) Genes of Herpes Simplex Virus
Meyer, Gilles; Vlcek, C.; Paces, V. et al

in Archives of Virology (1997), 142(1), 89-102

The nucleotide sequence of a 10.5 kb region (map position 0.332 to 0.410) of bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) was determined. This region contained three open reading frames (ORFs) homologous to herpes ... [more ▼]

The nucleotide sequence of a 10.5 kb region (map position 0.332 to 0.410) of bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) was determined. This region contained three open reading frames (ORFs) homologous to herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase catalytic subunit (DNApol, UL30), major DNA-binding protein (MDBP, UL29) and ICP18.5 assembly protein (ICP18.5, UL28). The BHV-1 DNApol. MDBP and ICP18.5 ORFs were 1246, 1203 and 826 amino acids long with a calculated molecular mass of 134.2 kDa, 124.4 kDa and 86.9 kDa, respectively. They showed a high homology with alphaherpesvirus homologs despite large differences in the G + C content of the UL30-UL28 segment ranging from 44.4% for varicella zoster virus to 71.5% for BHV-1. Particularly well conserved among Alphaherpesvirinae are the putative functional domains of the DNApol and MDBP proteins which are discussed. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BHV-1 clustered in the Varicellovirus genus with the animal D-type viruses. In this group, the BHV-1 position was shown to vary according to the investigated genes. Indeed, pseudorabies virus clustered with BHV-1 in the DNApol tree but with equine herpesvirus 1 in the ICP18.5 tree. [less ▲]

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See detailBovine Herpesvirus 1-Induced Apoptosis Occurs At The G0/G1 Phase Of The Cell Cycle
Hanon, Emilien ULg; Hoornaert, S.; Dequiedt, Franck ULg et al

in Virology (1997), 232(2), 351-358

We have previously shown that bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), even when inactivated, induces apoptotic cell death in mitogen-stimulated bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) (Hanon et al., 1996 ... [more ▼]

We have previously shown that bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), even when inactivated, induces apoptotic cell death in mitogen-stimulated bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) (Hanon et al., 1996, J. Virol. 70, 4116-4120). In order to gain insight into this process, we have investigated the cell cycle phase at which BHV-1 induces apoptosis in PBMCs. Our results show that the percentage of cells that progress through the S phase was always lower in BHV-1-infected PBMCs than in control cells. This effect was not due to a defective activation of mitogen-stimulated PBMCs since BHV-1 only slightly affected the percentage of cells expressing BoCD25, a well-known lymphocyte activation marker. Furthermore, mimosine and cyclosporine A, two chemicals that inhibit entry into the S phase of the cell cycle by different pathways, did not affect the ability of BHV-1 to induce apoptosis. BHV-1-induced apoptosis also occurred in unstimulated PBMCs and interestingly, this was associated with the expression of c-myc and BoCD25 proteins both of which are related to cell cycle progression. All together, these data provide evidence demonstrating that BHV-1-induced apoptosis occurs at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. [less ▲]

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See detailLa rhinotrachéite infectieuse bovine : caractéristiques du virus, l'infection et ses manifestations cliniques
Thiry, Etienne ULg; Lemaire, Mylène; Vanderheijden, Nathalie et al

in Bulletin des Groupements Techniques Vétérinaires (1997), 568

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See detailThe Role of Glycoproteins gC, gE, gI and gG in the Induction of Cell-Mediated Immune Responses to Bovine Herpesvirus 1
Denis, M.; Hanon, E.; Rijsewijk, F. A. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (1996), 53(1-2), 121-32

Mutant viruses with deletions in genes encoding non-essential glycoproteins are considered as promising bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) vaccine candidates. The present study compared the influence of various ... [more ▼]

Mutant viruses with deletions in genes encoding non-essential glycoproteins are considered as promising bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) vaccine candidates. The present study compared the influence of various gene deletions (gC, gE, gI, gG) on the induction of cell-mediated immune responses against the virus. The highest BHV1 specific lymphoproliferative response was observed in the group of calves inoculated with the gC- mutant. However, in all groups of inoculated calves, limiting dilution analysis showed marked individual variability in the number of BHV1 specific T lymphocytes that were stimulated. The same animals were then challenged with wild-type BHV1. In these animals, limiting dilution analysis did not reveal gE, gI nor gG as a major T lymphocyte antigen. However, further analysis suggested the T cell antigenicity of gE in a low number of BHV1 hyperimmunized calves. Stimulation of MHC unrestricted cytotoxicity was also evaluated after inoculation with the various deletion mutants. Cytotoxicity in gC- inoculated calves was as high as in BHV1 inoculated calves. In conclusion, among the BHV1 deletion mutants that were tested, the gC- mutant stimulated the best cell-mediated immune responses. [less ▲]

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See detailStructural and Functional Analysis of Bovine Herpesvirus 1 Minor Glycoproteins
Baranowski, Eric; Keil, Günther; Lyaku, Japhet et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (1996), 53(1-2), 91-101

This paper focuses on the structure and functions of bovine herpesvirus 1 minor glycoproteins gH, gE, gG and gp42. It reviews the progress which has been made in their identification and characterization ... [more ▼]

This paper focuses on the structure and functions of bovine herpesvirus 1 minor glycoproteins gH, gE, gG and gp42. It reviews the progress which has been made in their identification and characterization, in the study of their temporal expression and processing in infected cells, and finally in the understanding of their biological activities. In addition, aspects discussed include a comparison with two other alphaherpesviruses, namely herpes simplex virus and pseudorabies virus. [less ▲]

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See detailBovine Herpesvirus 4: Genomic Organization and Relationship with Two Other Gammaherpesviruses, Epstein-Barr Virus and Herpesvirus Saimiri
Lomonte, P.; Bublot, M.; van Santen, V. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (1996), 53(1-2), 79-89

Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BHV-4) belongs to the gammaherpesvirinae subfamily. Although the whole sequence of BHV-4 genome is not known it was possible, based on random sequencing, to assume that its genomic ... [more ▼]

Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BHV-4) belongs to the gammaherpesvirinae subfamily. Although the whole sequence of BHV-4 genome is not known it was possible, based on random sequencing, to assume that its genomic organization consists of genes clustered in blocks whose orientation and location in the genome are conserved within a herpesvirus subfamily. Between these blocks lie genes which are specific to either a particular virus or a virus subfamily. BHV-4 genome consists of 5 gene blocks conserved among the gammaherpesviruses and particularly within the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and the herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) genomes. Analysis of the regions located outside the gene blocks showed the presence of 12 open reading frames (ORFs). Protein database comparisons showed that no ORF translation products were similar to proteins encoded by alpha- or beta-herpesviruses. Nevertheless, 5 ORFs were homologous in amino acid sequences to proteins encoded by HVS and one was similar to a protein encoded by both HVS and EBV. On the basis of the molecular data BHV-4 is more closely related to HVS than to EBV. Genes homologous to cellular genes have been described in both HVS and EBV genomes. No genes homologous to presently sequenced cellular genes were found among those found in the BHV-4 genome to date. [less ▲]

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See detailEstablishment of a Rabbit Model for Bovine Herpesvirus Type 5 Neurological Acute Infection
Meyer, Gilles; Lemaire, Mylène; Lyaku, J. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (1996), 51(1-2), 27-40

This study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of the rabbit as a model for bovine, herpesvirus 5 (BHV-5) acute infection. In a preliminary experiment, a total of 24 one-month old New Zealand white ... [more ▼]

This study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of the rabbit as a model for bovine, herpesvirus 5 (BHV-5) acute infection. In a preliminary experiment, a total of 24 one-month old New Zealand white rabbits were inoculated with BHV-5 or bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) by the intraconjunctival, intracerebral or intranasal routes. BHV-5 or BHV-1 inoculated in the conjunctiva induced virus proliferation in the eye mucosae and the nasal cavity of rabbits without meningo-encephalitis. On the other hand, only BHV-5 infection by intranasal or intracerebral routes produced a fatal meningo-encephalitis. The intranasal route was used in a further experiment for the establishment of a rabbit model for BHV-5 infection. A total of 45 rabbits were inoculated intranasally with BHV-5 or BHV-1. The results showed that intranasal inoculation of BHV-5 strain N569 in rabbits was followed by the development of a lethal meningo-encephalitis for 66% of rabbits while all BHV-1 infected rabbits remained healthy throughout this experiment (28 days). Analysis between the mortalities of rabbits infected with BHV-5 and BHV-1 were highly significant (p < 0.001). The presence of BHV-5 in the central nervous system (CNS) was confirmed by virus isolation (essentially the cerebrum, midbrain and pons) and by immunohistochemical staining of BHV-5 antigen (essentially in the neurons of the cerebrum) only in BHV-5 infected rabbits showing clinical signs of meningo-encephalitis. The findings obtained confirmed the suitability of a rabbit model for the establishment of BHV-5 neurological acute infection and also as a valuable tool for the comparative study of BHV-5 and BHV-1 neuropathogenicity. [less ▲]

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See detailInactivated Bovine Herpesvirus 1 Induces Apoptotic Cell Death of Mitogen-Stimulated Bovine Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells
Hanon, E.; Vanderplasschen, Alain ULg; Lyaku, S. et al

in Journal of Virology (1996), 70(6), 4116-4120

Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) is able to inhibit the proliferation of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Here, we have demonstrated that live BHV-1 and, interestingly, inactivated BHV-1 can induce ... [more ▼]

Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) is able to inhibit the proliferation of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Here, we have demonstrated that live BHV-1 and, interestingly, inactivated BHV-1 can induce apoptosis of mitogen-stimulated bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. [less ▲]

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See detailLa traction : un effort impressionnant
Art, Tatiana ULg; Crigel, M. H.; Vandenput, Sandrina ULg et al

in Pastoret, Paul-Pierre; Laurant, P.; Courtois, R. (Eds.) et al Le Cheval Ardennais (1996)

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See detailThe Replication in Vitro of the Gammaherpesvirus Bovine Herpesvirus 4 Is Restricted by Its DNA Synthesis Dependence on the S Phase of the Cell Cycle
Vanderplasschen, Alain ULg; Goltz, M.; Lyaku, J. et al

in Virology (1995), 213(2), 328-40

Because several observations have suggested that replication of the gammaherpesvirus bovine herpesvirus 4 (BHV-4) is influenced by the physiological state of the host cell, a study was carried out to ... [more ▼]

Because several observations have suggested that replication of the gammaherpesvirus bovine herpesvirus 4 (BHV-4) is influenced by the physiological state of the host cell, a study was carried out to determine the relationship between BHV-4 infection and the cell cycle. The temporal expression of BHV-4 late (L) proteins in unsynchronized cell cultures was first investigated by flow cytometry. Interestingly, L protein expression occurred in a limited number of cells infected with a high multiplicity of infection, and a reciprocal correlation between the percentage of positive cells and the cell density at the time of infection was demonstrated. Moreover, the finding that a BHV-4 early-late protein was expressed in nearly all the cells suggested that a blockage in the viral replication cycle occurred in some infected cells at the stage of viral DNA synthesis or L protein expression. Because this blockage could be the consequence of the dependence of one or both of these events on the cell cycle, they were investigated after infection of synchronized cell cultures. The following findings were made. (i) Cell transition through the S phase quantitatively increased the rate of BHV-4 DNA replication. (ii) BHV-4 DNA synthesis could not be detected in cells arrested in G0. (iii) Synchronization of MDBK cells with Lovastatin before infection increased the percentage of cells expressing L proteins. (iv) In contrast, infection of cells arrested in G0 led to few positive cells. Taken together these results showed that BHV-4 DNA replication and consequently the expression of L proteins are dependent on the S phase of the cell cycle. This dependence could be of importance for several biological properties of BHV-4 infection in vitro and might have implications for the biology of the virus in vivo. [less ▲]

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See detailLatent Bovine Herpesvirus 1 Infection in Calves Protected by Colostral Immunity
Lemaire, Mylène; Meyer, Gilles; Ernst, E. et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (1995), 137(3), 70-1

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See detailAnalysis of Bovine Herpesvirus 4 Genomic Regions Located Outside the Conserved Gammaherpesvirus Gene Blocks
Lomonte, P.; Bublot, M.; van Santen, V. et al

in Journal of General Virology (The) (1995), 76((Pt 7)), 1835-41

Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BHV-4) DNA sequences located outside the gene blocks conserved among the gammaherpesviruses BHV-4, herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) were analysed. Twelve ... [more ▼]

Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BHV-4) DNA sequences located outside the gene blocks conserved among the gammaherpesviruses BHV-4, herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) were analysed. Twelve potential open reading frames (ORFs) were found. Protein database comparisons showed that no ORF translation products were similar to proteins encoded by alpha- or betaherpesviruses. Nevertheless, six of the ORFs were homologous in amino acid sequences to proteins encoded by HVS but apparently not to those encoded by EBV. Furthermore, the location and orientation of these six ORFs in the BHV-4 genome were similar to the corresponding ORFs in the HVS genome. No genes homologous to known cellular genes were found in the BHV-4 genome; this feature is the major difference between the BHV-4 and HVS genomes with regards to the overall gene content. [less ▲]

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See detailSynthesis and Processing of Bovine Herpesvirus-1 Glycoprotein H
Baranowski, Eric; Dubuisson, Jean; van Drunen Little-van den Hurk, Sylvia et al

in Virology (1995), 206(1), 651-4

The translation product of the bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) gH gene was identified and characterized. Synthetic peptides were used to generate specific antisera and a glycoprotein of 108K was precipitated ... [more ▼]

The translation product of the bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) gH gene was identified and characterized. Synthetic peptides were used to generate specific antisera and a glycoprotein of 108K was precipitated by one of the antisera. Cross-immunoprecipitations with monoclonal antibodies to BHV-1 glycoprotein gp108 and the anti-gH peptide antiserum demonstrated that gp108 is the translation product of the gH open reading frame. Glycoprotein gH synthesis and intracellular processing was analyzed in infected Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells using anti-gp 108 monoclonal antibodies. Glycoprotein gH is expressed as a beta-gamma protein and could be detected by radioimmunoprecipitation as early as 2 hr postinfection. Cotranslational N-glycosylation of gH is essential for the recognition by monoclonal antibodies, suggesting that N-linked glycans are involved in protein folding or that they are targets for most of monoclonal antibodies used in this study. [less ▲]

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