References of "PREISER, Jean-Charles"
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See detailThe long way of biomarkers: from bench to bedside.
Zhang, Haibo; Damas, Pierre ULg; PREISER, Jean-Charles ULg

in Intensive Care Medicine (2010), 36(4), 565-6

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See detailWhat makes tight glycemic control tight? The impact of variability and nutrition in two clinical studies.
Suhaimi, Fatanah; Le Compte, Aaron; Preiser, Jean-Charles ULg et al

in Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology (2010), 4(2), 284-98

INTRODUCTION: Tight glycemic control (TGC) remains controversial while successful, consistent, and effective protocols remain elusive. This research analyzes data from two TGC trials for root causes of ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Tight glycemic control (TGC) remains controversial while successful, consistent, and effective protocols remain elusive. This research analyzes data from two TGC trials for root causes of the differences achieved in control and thus potentially in glycemic and other outcomes. The goal is to uncover aspects of successful TGC and delineate the impact of differences in cohorts. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was conducted using records from a 211-patient subset of the GluControl trial taken in Liege, Belgium, and 393 patients from Specialized Relative Insulin Nutrition Titration (SPRINT) in New Zealand. Specialized Relative Insulin Nutrition Titration targeted 4.0-6.0 mmol/liter, similar to the GluControl A (N = 142) target of 4.4-6.1 mmol/liter. The GluControl B (N = 69) target was 7.8-10.0 mmol/liter. Cohorts were matched by Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score and percentage males (p > .35); however, the GluControl cohort was slightly older (p = .011). Overall cohort and per-patient comparisons (median, interquartile range) are shown for (a) glycemic levels achieved, (b) nutrition from carbohydrate (all sources), and (c) insulin dosing for this analysis. Intra- and interpatient variability were examined using clinically validated model-based insulin sensitivity metric and its hour-to-hour variation. RESULTS: Cohort blood glucose were as follows: SPRINT, 5.7 (5.0-6.6) mmol/liter; GluControl A, 6.3 (5.3-7.6) mmol/liter; and GluControl B, 8.2 (6.9-9.4) mmol/liter. Insulin dosing was 3.0 (1.0-3.0), 1.5 (0.5-3), and 0.7 (0.0-1.7) U/h, respectively. Nutrition from carbohydrate (all sources) was 435.5 (259.2-539.1), 311.0 (0.0-933.1), and 622.1 (103.7-1036.8) kcal/day, respectively. Median per-patient results for blood glucose were 5.8 (5.3-6.4), 6.4 (5.9-6.9), and 8.3 (7.6-8.8) mmol/liter. Insulin doses were 3.0 (2.0-3.0), 1.5 (0.8-2.0), and 0.5 (0.0-1.0) U/h. Carbohydrate administration was 383.6 (207.4-497.7), 103.7 (0.0-829.4), and 207.4 (0.0-725.8) kcal/day. Overall, SPRINT gave approximately 2x more insulin with a 3-4x narrower, but generally non-zero, range of nutritional input to achieve equally TGC with less hypoglycemia. Specialized Relative Insulin Nutrition Titration had much less hypoglycemia (<2.2 mmol/liter), with 2% of patients, compared to GluControl A (7.7%) and GluControl B (2.9%), indicating much lower variability, with similar results for glucose levels <3.0 mmol/liter. Specialized Relative Insulin Nutrition Titration also had less hyperglycemia (>8.0 mmol/liter) than groups A and B. GluControl patients (A+B) had a approximately 2x wider range of insulin sensitivity than SPRINT. Hour-to-hour variation was similar. Hence GluControl had greater interpatient variability but similar intrapatient variability. CONCLUSION: Protocols that dose insulin blind to carbohydrate administration can suffer greater outcome glycemic variability, even if average cohort glycemic targets are met. While the cohorts varied significantly in model-assessed insulin resistance, their variability was similar. Such significant intra- and interpatient variability is a further significant cause and marker of glycemic variability in TGC. The results strongly recommended that TGC protocols be explicitly designed to account for significant intra- and interpatient variability in insulin resistance, as well as specifying or having knowledge of carbohydrate administration to minimize variability in glycemic outcomes across diverse cohorts and/or centers. [less ▲]

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See detailPulmonary veno-occlusive disease in myeloproliferative disorder.
Willems, Evelyne ULg; Canivet, Jean-Luc ULg; Ghaye, Benoît ULg et al

in European Respiratory Journal (2009), 33(1), 213-216

The present study reports a case of biopsy-proven pulmonary veno-occlusive disease as a cause of severe pulmonary hypertension in a patient suffering from a chronic myeloproliferative disorder. The ... [more ▼]

The present study reports a case of biopsy-proven pulmonary veno-occlusive disease as a cause of severe pulmonary hypertension in a patient suffering from a chronic myeloproliferative disorder. The pulmonary disease evolved favourably under treatment with defibrotide, a pro-fibrinolytic medication used in hepatic veno-occlusive disease. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat makes TGC protocols “T” (tight)? An analysis of data from 2 studies
Suhaimi, F.; LeCompte, A. J.; Preiser, Jean-Charles ULg et al

in Proc 9th Annual Diabetes Technology Meeting (DTM2009) (2009)

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See detailSAPS 3 admission score: an external validation in a general intensive care population
Ledoux, Didier ULg; Canivet, Jean-Luc ULg; Preiser, Jean-Charles ULg et al

in Intensive Care Medicine (2008)

OBJECTIVES: To validate the SAPS 3 admission score in an independent general intensive care case mix and to compare its performances with the APACHE II and the SAPS II scores. DESIGN: Cohort observational ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: To validate the SAPS 3 admission score in an independent general intensive care case mix and to compare its performances with the APACHE II and the SAPS II scores. DESIGN: Cohort observational study. SETTING: A 26-bed general ICU from a Tertiary University Hospital. PATIENTS AND PARTICIPANTS: Eight hundred and fifty-one consecutive patients admitted to the ICU over an 8-month period. Of these patients, 49 were readmissions, leaving 802 patients for further analysis. INTERVENTION: None. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: APACHE II, SAPS II and SAPS 3 variables were prospectively collected; scores and their derived probability of death were calculated according to their original manuscript description. The discriminative power was assessed using the area under the ROC curve (AUROC) and calibration was verified with the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test. The AUROC of the APACHE II model (AUROC = 0.823) was significantly lower than those of the SAPS II (AUROC = 0.850) and SAPS 3 models (AUROC = 0.854) (P = 0.038). The calibration of the APACHE II model (P = 0.037) and of the SAPS 3 global model (P = 0.035) appeared unsatisfactory. On the contrary, both SAPS II model and SAPS 3 model customised for Central and Western Europe had a good calibration. However, in our study case mix, SAPS II model tended to overestimate the probability of death. CONCLUSION: In this study, the SAPS 3 admission score and its prediction model customised for Central and Western Europe was more discriminative and better calibrated than APACHE II, but it was not significantly better than the SAPS II. [less ▲]

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See detailIntensive care unit acquired infection and organ failure
Damas, Pierre ULg; Ledoux, Didier ULg; Nys, Monique ULg et al

in Intensive Care Medicine (2008), 34

OBJECTIVE: To assess the temporal relationship between ICU-acquired infection (IAI) and the prevalence and severity of organ dysfunction or failure (OD/F). DESIGN AND SETTING: Observational, single center ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To assess the temporal relationship between ICU-acquired infection (IAI) and the prevalence and severity of organ dysfunction or failure (OD/F). DESIGN AND SETTING: Observational, single center study in a mixed intensive care unit of a university hospital. PATIENTS: We analyzed 1,191 patients hospitalized for more than 2 days during a 2-year observation period: 845 did not acquire IAI, 306 of whom had infection on admission (IOA); 346 did acquire IAI, 125 of whom had IOA. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: The SOFA score was calculated daily, both SOFAmax, the sum of the worst OD/F during the ICU stay, and SOFApreinf, the sum of the worst OD/F existing before the occurrence of the first IAI. The SAPS II and SOFA score of the first 24 h were significantly higher in patients with than in those without IAI. SOFApreinf of IAI patients was also higher than the SOFAmax of patients without IAI both in patients with (12.1+/-4.6 vs. 8.9+/-4.7) and those without IOA (9.2+/-4.0 vs. 6.7+/-3.5). SOFApreinf represented 85.7% of the value of SOFAmax in patients with IAI. SOFApreinf increased significantly with the occurrence of sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock during ICU stay. Severe sepsis and septic shock during ICU stay as well as SOFApreinf were part of the factors associated with hospital mortality. CONCLUSIONS: IAI is significantly associated with hospital mortality; however, its contribution to OD/F is minor. Moreover, severity of IAI seems to be related to previous health status. [less ▲]

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See detailRestoring Normoglycaemia: Not So Harmless
Preiser, Jean-Charles ULg

in Critical Care (London, England) (2008), 12(1), 116

ABSTRACT: Three independent studies of tight glucose control were recently stopped prematurely due to an excess mortality in the intensive treatment arm. This commentary briefly discusses the potential ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT: Three independent studies of tight glucose control were recently stopped prematurely due to an excess mortality in the intensive treatment arm. This commentary briefly discusses the potential mechanisms and reminds the potential benefits of physiological stress hyperglycemia. [less ▲]

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See detailChurg Strauss Syndrome masquerading septic shock.
Delleuze, Pierre-Philippe; CANIVET, Jean-Luc ULg; PREISER, Jean-Charles ULg et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (2008), 63(4), 269-72

Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) can be related to acute inflammatory conditions that can be sometimes missed and inappropriately managed as severe infections. We report a case of Churg ... [more ▼]

Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) can be related to acute inflammatory conditions that can be sometimes missed and inappropriately managed as severe infections. We report a case of Churg Strauss Syndrome (CSS), presenting as septic shock with acute onset of fever and multiple organ failure including pulmonary involvement with severe hypoxemia, hypotension requiring vasoactive support and acute renal failure. Antibiotics were discontinued and intravenous steroids allowed a rapid clinical improvement in close relationship with the fall in circulating eosinophils count. [less ▲]

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See detailGoal-directed Intraoperative therapy reduces morbidity and length of hospital stay in high-risk surgical patients
Donati, A.; Loggi, S.; Preiser, Jean-Charles ULg et al

in Chest (2007), 132(6), 1817-1824

Background: Postoperative organ failures commonly occur after major abdominal surgery, increasing the utilization of resources and costs of care. Tissue hypoxia is a key trigger of organ dysfunction. A ... [more ▼]

Background: Postoperative organ failures commonly occur after major abdominal surgery, increasing the utilization of resources and costs of care. Tissue hypoxia is a key trigger of organ dysfunction. A therapeutic strategy designed to detect and reverse tissue hypoxia, as diagnosed by an increase of oxygen extraction (0,ER) over a predefined threshold, could decrease the incidence of organ failures. The primary aim of this study was to compare the number of patients with postoperative organ failure and length of hospital stay between those randomized to conventional vs a protocolized strategy designed to maintain O2ER < 27%. Methods: A prospective, randomized, controlled trial was performed in nine hospitals in Italy. One hundred thirty-five high-risk patients scheduled for major abdominal surgery were randomized in two groups. All patients were managed to achieve standard goals: mean arterial pressure > 80 mm Hg and urinary output > 0.5 mL/kg/h. The patients of the "protocol group" (group A) were also managed to keep O2ER < 27%. Measurements and main results: In group A, fewer patients had at least one organ failure (n = 8, 11.8%) than in group B (n = 20, 29.8%) [p < 0.05], and the total number of organ failures was lower in group A than in group B (27 failures vs 9 failures, p < 0.001). Length of hospital stay was significantly lower in the protocol group than in the control group (11.3 +/- 3.8 days vs 13.4 +/- 6.1 days, p < 0.05). Hospital mortality was similar in both groups. Conclusions: Early treatment directed to maintain O2ER at < 27% reduces organ failures and hospital stay of high-risk surgical patients. Clinical trials.gov reference No. NCT00254150. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical Experience with Tight Glucose Control by Intensive Insulin Therapy
Preiser, Jean-Charles ULg; Devos, P.

in Critical Care Medicine (2007), 35(9 Suppl), 503-7

OBJECTIVE: To describe the current status and the clinical data related to the effects of tight glucose control by intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients. DESIGN: Review article. SETTING ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To describe the current status and the clinical data related to the effects of tight glucose control by intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients. DESIGN: Review article. SETTING: University hospital. PATIENTS: Medical and surgical critically ill patients in whom a correlation between blood glucose and outcome variables were searched. INTERVENTIONS: Tight glucose control by intensive insulin therapy. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: In contrast to the decreases in mortality and to low severity of adverse effects reported when insulin rate was titrated to keep blood glucose between 80 and 110 mg/dL, the benefits were not confirmed in multicenter prospective studies. Retrospective data found an association between a mean blood glucose level of <140-150 mg/dL and improved outcome. Currently unanswered issues include the optimal target for blood glucose, the effects of high blood glucose variability, the risks and hazards of hypoglycemia, and the potential influence of the underlying disorder on the effects of tight glucose control. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations regarding the practical aspects of tight glucose control by intensive insulin therapy cannot be presently issued. An intermediate target level for blood glucose of 140-180 mg/dL seems to be associated with the lowest risk-to-benefit ratio. [less ▲]

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See detailPancreatic cellular injury after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass: Frequency, time course and risk factors
Nys, Monique ULg; Venneman, Ingrid ULg; Deby-Dupont, G. et al

in Shock (Augusta, Ga.) (2007), 27(5), 474-481

Although often clinically silent, pancreatic cellular injury (PCI) is relatively frequent after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass; and its etiology and time course are largely unknown. We ... [more ▼]

Although often clinically silent, pancreatic cellular injury (PCI) is relatively frequent after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass; and its etiology and time course are largely unknown. We defined PCI as the simultaneous presence of abnormal values of pancreatic isoamylase and immunoreactive trypsin (IRT). The frequency and time evolution of PCI were assessed in this condition using assays for specific exocrine pancreatic enzymes. Correlations with inflammatory markers were searched for preoperative risk factors. One hundred ninety-three patients submitted to cardiac surgery were enrolled prospectively. Blood IRT, amylase, pancreatic isoamylase, lipase, and markers of inflammation (alpha1-protease inhibitor, alpha2-macroglobulin, myeloperoxidase) were measured preoperatively and postoperatively until day 8. The postoperative increase in plasma levels of pancreatic enzymes and urinary IRT was biphasic in all patients: early after surgery and later (from day 4 to 8 after surgery). One hundred thirty-three patients (69%) experienced PCI, with mean IRT, isoamylase, and alpha1-protease inhibitor values higher for each sample than that in patients without PCI. By multiple regression analysis, we found preoperative values of plasma IRT >or=40 ng/mL, amylase >or=42 IU/mL, and pancreatic isoamylase >or=20 IU/L associated with a higher incidence of postsurgery PCI (P < 0.005). In the PCI patients, a significant correlation was found between the 4 pancreatic enzymes and urinary IRT, total calcium, myeloperoxidase, alpha1-protease inhibitor, and alpha2-macroglobulin. These data support a high prevalence of postoperative PCI after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, typically biphasic and clinically silent, especially when pancreatic enzymes were elevated preoperatively. [less ▲]

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See detailSteps for the implementation and validationof tight glucose control
Preiser, Jean-Charles ULg; Devos, P.

in Intensive Care Medicine (2007), 33(4), 570-571

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See detailCurrent controversies around tight glucose control in critically ill patients
Devos, P.; Preiser, Jean-Charles ULg

in Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care (2007), 10(2), 206-209

Purpose of review This review updates our knowledge on the benefits and risks of tight glucose control by intensive insulin therapy critically ill patients, as well as discussing unanswered questions ... [more ▼]

Purpose of review This review updates our knowledge on the benefits and risks of tight glucose control by intensive insulin therapy critically ill patients, as well as discussing unanswered questions related to the subject. Recent findings At the cellular level, the toxic effects of elevated and highly variable glucose concentration are related to an increase in oxidative stress and to several toxic intracellular derivates generated as by-products of the glycolytic pathway. Clinically, several recent studies have suggested that the optimal target for blood glucose may be higher than the 'normal' values of 4.4-6.1 mmol/l for various categories of patients. Also, the variability in glucose level, appears to be an important determinant of glucose toxicity. Conflicting data on the hazards of,hypoglycaemia are emerging. Summary Practical recommendations for the implementation of tight glucose control using intensive insulin therapy cannot be disseminated until questions relating to optimal blood glucose level and the corresponding categories of patients have been resolved. The issues of glucose, variability and the most efficient method of preventing hypoglycaemia will probably represent important parameters for comparing the safety and quality of protocols used for tight glucose control. [less ▲]

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See detailGestion de la glycémie aux soins intensifs
Preiser, Jean-Charles ULg; Devos, P.

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2007), 62 Spec No

The aim of this article is to describe the current status and understanding and the clinical data related to the effects of Tight Glucose Control by Intensive Insulin therapy, TGCIIT, in critically ill ... [more ▼]

The aim of this article is to describe the current status and understanding and the clinical data related to the effects of Tight Glucose Control by Intensive Insulin therapy, TGCIIT, in critically ill patients. Recent prospectively collected data, from one centre, demonstrated decreases of mortality and of various other outcomes in critically ill patients treated with TGCIIT. These results are currently awaiting confirmation, although available data from prospective multi-centre studies do not seem to support the external validity of the beneficial effects of TGCIIT titrated to restore blood glucose between 80 and 110 mg/dl. Also, recent data raised new closely related and relevant issues including the variability of blood glucose, the risks of hypoglycaemia, and the delineation of the categories of patients in whom TGCIIT could bring an actual benefit. [less ▲]

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See detailActualites therapeutiques en medecine intensive.
CANIVET, Jean-Luc ULg; Monchi, Mehran; PREISER, Jean-Charles ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2007), 62(5-6), 277-80

Over the last ten years, much progress has been achieved in intensive care medicine. Large randomized studies, most often their multicentric, were performed and their results were translated into rules to ... [more ▼]

Over the last ten years, much progress has been achieved in intensive care medicine. Large randomized studies, most often their multicentric, were performed and their results were translated into rules to be followed for the most appropriate treatment of life-threatening organ failures. The place of non-invasive ventilation in the management of hypercapnic or hypoxic respiratory insufficiencies was thus defined, and the methods for less traumatic mechanical ventilation were specified. The techniques of renal replacement therapy were compared and the optimal doses of dialysis or hemofiltration were established. The metabolic support of the patients was also altered following landmark studies, such as the management of blood glucose, which deeply influenced the approach to critically ill patients. [less ▲]

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See detailBiomarkers of oxidative stress in critically ill patients: what should be measured, when and how?
Lemineur, T.; Deby-Dupont, G.; Preiser, Jean-Charles ULg

in Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care (2006), 9(6), 704-710

Purpose of review This review is dedicated to updating the knowledge on oxidative stress in critically ill patients with an intense inflammatory reaction, and to link it with recent findings supporting ... [more ▼]

Purpose of review This review is dedicated to updating the knowledge on oxidative stress in critically ill patients with an intense inflammatory reaction, and to link it with recent findings supporting the possible involvement of oxidative injuries in systems and organs that frequently fail in the critically ill. Recent findings Some direct or indirect biomarkers of oxidative stress have been validated in critically ill patients, and further support the major role of oxidative stress in these conditions. Summary The assessment of oxidative stress, defined as the association between an increased production of oxygen-derived species and an exhaustion of the stores of antioxidants, requires a multimodal approach. Oxidative damage itself can be much better estimated by quantifying the oxidative byproducts of the lipids and proteins associated with an evaluation of the remaining stores of the corresponding functional antioxidants, or the activity of antioxidant enzymes, than by global tests of the total oxidative damage or the total antioxidant stores. Recent clinical data confirm an important role of increased oxidative stress in the acute dysfunctions of the respiratory, renal and cerebral systems. [less ▲]

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See detailMethylene blue: An old-timer or a compound ready for revival?
Donati, A.; Preiser, Jean-Charles ULg

in Critical Care Medicine (2006), 34(11), 2862-2863

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See detailThe ideal arena for intensive and continuous questioning
Preiser, Jean-Charles ULg

in Current Opinion in Critical Care (2006), 12(4), 289-289

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