References of "PIERARD, Luc"
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See detailTraitement percutané d’une cardiomyopathie hypertrophique obstructive
Moonen, Marie ULg; Legrand, Victor ULg; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2009), 64(10), 481

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See detailIschaemic mitral regurgitation: mechanisms and diagnosis.
Marwick, Th; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Pierard, Luc ULg

in Heart (2009), 95(20), 1711-8

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See detailPercutaneous transvenous mitral annuloplasty: initial human experience with a novel coronary sinus implant device.
Sack, S.; Kahlert, P.; Bilodeau, L. et al

in Circulation Cardiovascular Interventions (2009), 2(4), 277-84

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See detailRisk Score for Predicting Outcome in Patients With Asymptomatic Aortic Stenosis
Monin, J. L.; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Monchi, M. et al

in Circulation (2009), 120(1), 69-75

Background— The management of patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis remains controversial. We sought to develop a continuous risk score for predicting the midterm development of symptoms or ... [more ▼]

Background— The management of patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis remains controversial. We sought to develop a continuous risk score for predicting the midterm development of symptoms or adverse events in this setting. Methods and Results— We prospectively followed 107 patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (aged 72 years [63 to 77]; 35 women; aortic-jet velocity, 4.1 m/s [3.5 to 4.4]) at a single center in France. Predefined end points for assessing outcome were the occurrence within 24 months of death or aortic valve replacement necessitated by symptoms or by a positive exercise test. Variables independently associated with outcome were used to build a score that was validated in an independent cohort of 107 patients from Belgium. Independent predictors of outcome were female sex, peak aortic-jet velocity, and B-type natriuretic peptide at baseline. Accordingly, the score could be calculated as follows: Score=[peak velocity (m/s)x2]+(natural logarithm of B-type natriuretic peptidex1.5)+1.5 (if female sex). Event-free survival after 20 months was 80% for patients within the first score quartile compared with only 7% for the fourth quartile. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the score were 0.90 and 0.89 in the development and validation cohorts, respectively. Conclusions— If further validation is achieved, this score may be useful to predict outcome in individual patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis to select those who might benefit from early surgery. [less ▲]

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See detailBaseline inflammation is not predictive of periprocedural troponin elevation after elective percutaneous coronary intervention.
Gach, Olivier ULg; Louis, Olivier ULg; Chapelle, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Heart & Vessels (2009), 24(4), 267-70

High-sensitivity C-reactive protein predicts future cardiovascular events in both healthy individuals and patients with unstable and stable coronary syndromes. Few data are available about the incidence ... [more ▼]

High-sensitivity C-reactive protein predicts future cardiovascular events in both healthy individuals and patients with unstable and stable coronary syndromes. Few data are available about the incidence and the relation to inflammation of troponin elevation following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a potential predictor of longterm outcome. We sought to confirm the impact of embolization on long-term outcome and evaluate the ability of baseline inflammation to predict troponin elevation induced by PCI. We prospectively analyzed 200 patients treated by PCI for stable or Braunwald IIA class unstable angina. The patients were recruited between January 1997 and May 1999, and the population was followed during a mean follow-up of 32 months. Major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) were defined as the occurrence of death, myocardial infarction or recurrent angina requiring repeat PCI, or coronary artery bypass grafting. During the follow-up period, 58 MACEs were observed. By multivariate analysis, independent predictors for the occurrence of MACEs were unstable angina and troponin I level after PCI (P < 0.0001 for both). No correlation was found between baseline inflammation and significant troponin I elevation post PCI and by multivariate analysis, no biological variable was a predictor of troponin I elevation post PCI. Baseline inflammation cannot predict onset of minor myonecrosis damage (expressed by troponin elevation) induced by PCI, a significant predictor of long-term outcome in this setting. [less ▲]

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See detailAfterload mismatch revealed by an exercise biphasic response in aortic stenosis
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Moonen, Marie ULg; Garweg, Christophe ULg et al

in Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases (2009), 102(6-7), 593-594

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See detailRosuvastatin in Patients with Elevated C-Reactive Protein
Pierard, Luc ULg

in New England Journal of Medicine [=NEJM] (2009), 360(10), 1040

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See detailThe value of 2D strain imaging during stress testing
Moonen, Marie ULg; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Zacharakis, Dimitrios et al

in Echocardiography (2009), 26(3), 307

Stress echocardiography is increasingly used but its major limitation is the subjective interpretation of wall motion changes requiring experience. Speckle tracking enables simultaneous evaluation of ... [more ▼]

Stress echocardiography is increasingly used but its major limitation is the subjective interpretation of wall motion changes requiring experience. Speckle tracking enables simultaneous evaluation of radial, longitudinal, and circumferential myocardial deformation. Recently, two-dimensional (2D) strain has been found to be as reliable as sonomicrometry for the assessment of left ventricular (LV) regional function. In the presence of inducible ischemia, longitudinal and circumferential abnormalities preceed the decrease in radial deformation. Optimal cutoffs have been obtained from 2D strain rate (SR) at peak dobutamine stress to predict coronary artery disease. However, 2D strain rate does not yet provide incremental accuracy to visual interpretation by experts. Speckle tracking strain could be useful to better identify contractile reverse and biphasic response of viable myocardium but there are not yet clinical studies published in this setting. Preliminary results suggest that 2D strain obtained during exercise could be useful in asymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis or organic mitral regurgitation (MR). In conclusion, the reliability and clinical importance of 2D strain during stress will be specified by further investigations. [less ▲]

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See detailEchocardiography in the emergency roon: non-invasive imaging.
Pierard, Luc ULg; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg

in Heart (2009), 95(2), 164

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See detailGuia de practica clinica para la valoracion del riesgo cardiaco preoperatorio y el manejo cardiaco perioperatorio en la cirugia no cardiaca
Poldermans, Don; Bax, Jeroen J.; Boersma, Eric et al

in Revista Española de Cardiología (English version) (2009), 62(12), 14671-146756

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See detailStratification du risque dans la cardiomyopathie hypertrophique.
Crochelet, A. S.; Crochelet, L.; Pierard, Luc ULg

in Revue medicale de Liege (2009), 64(11), 576-80

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is of genetic origin, characterized by asymmetric left ventricular hypertrophy and variable clinical presentation. The physiopathology includes diastolic dysfunction and, in ... [more ▼]

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is of genetic origin, characterized by asymmetric left ventricular hypertrophy and variable clinical presentation. The physiopathology includes diastolic dysfunction and, in one third of the patients, dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. Patients are at increased risk of sudden death. Risk stratification in the individual patient is an essential component of management. This article describes the clinical presentation of a patient and his mother and summarizes essential features of the disease and the current recommendations for the prevention of sudden cardiac death. [less ▲]

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See detailL'image du mois. Traitement percutane d'une cardiomyopathie hypertrophique obstructive.
Moonen, Marie ULg; Legrand, Victor ULg; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2009), 64(10), 481-3

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See detailMedical therapy for rheumatic heart disease: is it time to be proactive rather than reactive?
Rajamannan, Nalini M.; Antonini-Canterin, Francesco; Moura, Luis et al

in Indian Heart Journal (2009), 61(1), 14-23

Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD) is well known to be an active inflammatory process which develops progressive calcification and leaflet thickening over time. The potential for statin therapy in slowing the ... [more ▼]

Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD) is well known to be an active inflammatory process which develops progressive calcification and leaflet thickening over time. The potential for statin therapy in slowing the progression of valvular heart disease is still controversial. Retrospective studies have shown that medical therapy is beneficial for patients with calcific aortic stenosis and recently for rheumatic valve disease. However, the prospective randomized clinical trials have been negative to date. This article discusses the epidemiologic risk factors, basic science, retrospective and prospective studies in valvular heart disease and a future clinical trial to target RHD with statin therapy to slow the progression of this disease. Recent epidemiological studies have revealed the risk factors associated with valvular disease include male gender, smoking, hypertension and elevated serum cholesterol and are similar to the risk factors for vascular atherosclerosis. An increasing number of models of experimental hypercholesterolemia demonstrate features of atherosclerosis in the aortic valve (AV), which are similar to the early stages of vascular atherosclerotic lesions. Calcification, the end stage process of the disease, must be understood as a prognostic indicator in the modification of this cellular process before it is too late. This is important in calcific aortic stenosis as well as in rheumatic valve disease. There are a growing number of studies that describe similar pathophysiologic molecular markers in the development of rheumatic valve disease as in calcific aortic stenosis. In summary, these findings suggest that medical therapies may have a potential role in patients in the early stages of this disease process to slow the progression of RHD affecting the valves. This review will summarize the potential for statin therapy for this patient population. [less ▲]

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See detailMyocardial contractile reserve during exercise predicts left ventricular reserve remodelling after cardiac resynchromization therapy
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Senechal, Mario; Moonen, Marie ULg et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2009), 10(5), 663-8

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See detailImpact of contractile reserve on acute response to cardiac resynchronization therapy
Moonen, Marie ULg; Senechal, Mario; Cosyns, Bernard et al

in Cardiovascular Ultrasound (2008), 6(65),

Background: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) provides benefit for congestive heart failure, but still 30% of patients failed to respond to such therapy. This lack of response may be due to the ... [more ▼]

Background: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) provides benefit for congestive heart failure, but still 30% of patients failed to respond to such therapy. This lack of response may be due to the presence of significant amount of scar or fibrotic tissue at myocardial level. This study sought to investigate the potential impact of myocardial contractile reserve as assessed during exercise echocardiography on acute response following CRT implantation. Methods: Fifty-one consecutive patients with heart failure (LV ejection fraction 27% ± 5%, 67% ischemic cardiomyopathy) underwent exercise Doppler echocardiography before CRT implantation to assess global contractile reserve (improvement in LV ejection fraction) and local contractile reserve in the region of the LV pacing lead (assessed by radial strain using speckle tracking analysis). Responders were defined by an increase in stroke volume ≥15% after CRT. Results: Compared with nonresponders, responders (25 patients) showed a greater exercise-induced increase in LV ejection fraction, a higher degree of mitral regurgitation and a significant extent of LV dyssynchrony. The presence of contractile reserve was directly related to the acute increase in stroke volume (r = 0.48, p<0.001). Baseline myocardial deformation as well as contractile reserve in the LV pacing lead region was greater in responders during exercise than in nonresponders (p<0.0001). Conclusions: Heart failure patients referred to CRT have less chance of improving under therapy if they have no significant mitral regurgitation, no LV dyssynchrony and no contractile myocardial recruitment at exercise. [less ▲]

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