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See detailVernalization-induced repression of FLOWERING LOCUS C stimulates flowering in Sinapis alba and enhances plant responsiveness to photoperiod.
D'Aloia, Maria ULg; Tocquin, Pierre ULg; Périlleux, Claire ULg

in New Phytologist (2008), 178(4), 755-65

Of the Brassicaceae, Sinapis alba has been intensively studied as a physiological model of induction of flowering by a single long day (LD), while molecular-genetic analyses of Arabidopsis thaliana have ... [more ▼]

Of the Brassicaceae, Sinapis alba has been intensively studied as a physiological model of induction of flowering by a single long day (LD), while molecular-genetic analyses of Arabidopsis thaliana have disclosed complex interactions between pathways controlling flowering in response to different environmental cues, such as photoperiod and vernalization. The vernalization process in S. alba was therefore analysed here. The coding sequence of S. alba SaFLC, which is orthologous to the A. thaliana floral repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C, was isolated and the transcript levels quantified in different conditions. Two-week-old seedlings grown in noninductive short days (SDs) were vernalized for 1-6 wk. Down-regulation of SaFLC was already marked after 1 wk of cold but 2 wk was needed for a significant acceleration of flowering. Flower buds were initiated during vernalization. When vernalization was stopped after 1 wk, repression of SaFLC was not stable but a significant increase in plant responsiveness to 16-h LDs was observed when LDs followed immediately after the cold treatment. These results suggest that vernalization does not only work when plants experience long exposure to cold during the winter: shorter cold periods might stimulate flowering of LD plants if they occur when photoperiod is increasing, such as in spring. [less ▲]

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See detailPas si zen: des plantes de maïs stressées sont placées sous haute surveillance
Périlleux, Claire ULg

Article for general public (2008)

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See detailLes plantes ont-elles un quota de CO2 fixé ?
Périlleux, Claire ULg

Article for general public (2008)

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See detailStability of SaFLC repression in Sinapis alba. A link with quantitative effect of vernalization
D'Aloia, Maria ULg; Périlleux, Claire ULg

in Plant Signaling & Behavior (2008), 3(11), 1002-1004

In Arabidopsis thaliana, vernalization promotes flowering by repressing the floral inhibitor FLOWERING LOCUS C (AtFLC). This repression is mediated through epigenetic modifications at the AtFLC locus ... [more ▼]

In Arabidopsis thaliana, vernalization promotes flowering by repressing the floral inhibitor FLOWERING LOCUS C (AtFLC). This repression is mediated through epigenetic modifications at the AtFLC locus, leading to gene silencing. Whether the well-known quantitative effect of vernalization is due to the degree of AtFLC repression and/or its stability after return to normal temperature conditions has not been clarified. Here, we examine this question in white mustard, Sinapis alba, taking advantage of our recent cloning of the AtFLC ortholog SaFLC. [less ▲]

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See detailPartenariat F.N.P.S.M.S. - ULg / Rapport d'activité ULg 2006
Périlleux, Claire ULg; Van Kerkoven, Fabrizio; Jennès, Nicolas

Report (2007)

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See detailRapport final ARAPONIC - First spin-off n°315461
Tocquin, Pierre ULg; Périlleux, Claire ULg

Report (2007)

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See detailPlant-based production of human lysozyme mutants
Tocquin, Pierre ULg; Dumoulin, Mireille ULg; Dony, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailControl of floral transition in maize
Van Kerkhoven, Fabrizio ULg; Jennès, Nicolas; Périlleux, Claire ULg

in Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A : Molecular & Integrative Physiology (2006), 143(4), 170

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See detailCloning of CONSTANS and FLOWERING LOCUS T in Sinapis alba.
Tamseddak, Karim; D'Aloia, Maria ULg; Périlleux, Claire ULg

in Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A : Molecular & Integrative Physiology (2006), 143A

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See detailGenetical control of sympodial growth and flowering in tomato
Thouet, Johanna ULg; Ormenese, Sandra ULg; Périlleux, Claire ULg

in Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A : Molecular & Integrative Physiology (2006), 143(4), 170-171

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See detailPartenariat F.N.P.S.M.S. - ULg / Rapport d'activité ULg 2005
Périlleux, Claire ULg; Van Kerkhoven, Fabrizio; Jennès, Nicolas

Report (2006)

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See detailCytokinin application to the shoot apical meristem of Sinapis alba enhances secondary plasmodesmata formation.
Ormenese, Sandra ULg; Bernier, Georges ULg; Périlleux, Claire ULg

in Planta (2006), 224(6), 1481-4

A single application of cytokinin benzyladenine causes a threefold increase in the frequency of plasmodesmata in the vegetative shoot apical meristem (SAM) of Sinapis alba plants. This increase is ... [more ▼]

A single application of cytokinin benzyladenine causes a threefold increase in the frequency of plasmodesmata in the vegetative shoot apical meristem (SAM) of Sinapis alba plants. This increase is observed 20 h after application within all cell layers (L1, L2, L3) as well as at the interfaces between these layers. Evidence is presented indicating that cytokinin promotes mainly the formation of new secondary plasmodesmata. A similar increase in the frequency of secondary plasmodesmata was observed in the Sinapis SAM during the floral transition induced by a single long day, suggesting that this effect of the long day is mediated by cytokinin. [less ▲]

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See detailAcclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana to long-term CO2 enrichment and nitrogen supply is basically a matter of growth rate adjustment
Tocquin, Pierre ULg; Ormenese, Sandra ULg; Pieltain, Alexandra ULg et al

in Physiologia Plantarum (2006), 128(4), 677-688

The long-term response of Arabidopsis thaliana to increasing CO2 was evaluated in plants grown in 800 mu l 1(-1) CO2 from sowing and maintained, in hydroponics, on three nitrogen supplies: "low," "medium ... [more ▼]

The long-term response of Arabidopsis thaliana to increasing CO2 was evaluated in plants grown in 800 mu l 1(-1) CO2 from sowing and maintained, in hydroponics, on three nitrogen supplies: "low," "medium" and "high." The global response to high CO2 and N-supply was evaluated by measuring growth parameters in parallel with photosynthetic activity, leaf carbohydrates, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) messenger RNA and protein, stomatal conductance (g(s)) and density. CO2 enrichment was found to stimulate biomass production, whatever the N-supply. This stimulation was transient on low N-supply and persisted throughout the whole vegetative growth only in high N-supply. Acclimation on low N-high CO2 was not associated with carbohydrate accumulation or with a strong reduction in Rubisco amount or activity. At high N-supply, growth stimulation by high CO2 was mainly because of the acceleration of leaf production and expansion while other parameters such as specific leaf area, root/shoot ratio and g, appeared to be correlated with total leaf area. Our results thus suggest that, in strictly controlled and stable growing conditions, acclimation of A. thaliana to longterm CO2 enrichment is mostly controlled by growth rate adjustment. [less ▲]

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See detailThe FLC-dependent vernalization pathway in Sinapis alba.
D'Aloia, Maria ULg; Tocquin, Pierre ULg; Périlleux, Claire ULg

in Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Physiology (2006), 143A

In many plants, flowering is promoted by a long exposure to cold, a process known as ‘vernalisation’. In Arabidopsis, the vernalisation pathway was shown to promote flowering via the repression of the ... [more ▼]

In many plants, flowering is promoted by a long exposure to cold, a process known as ‘vernalisation’. In Arabidopsis, the vernalisation pathway was shown to promote flowering via the repression of the FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) gene, which encodes a repressor of flowering. As far as we know, the genetical control of flowering is conserved among Brassicaceae, and we reported elsewhere cloning of flowering times genes of the photoperiodic pathway in Sinapis alba, based on sequence similarity with Arabidopsis. However, little is known about vernalisation in Sinapis. We therefore undertook a physiological and molecular study of this process. Plants of Sinapis were grown in non inductive short days and vernalised at 7°C, at the seedling stage. Vernalisation was found to accelerate flowering and an increasing effect was observed for vernalisation treatments longer than 2 weeks. We cloned an FLC-like sequence (SaFLC) by screening a cDNA library, and used it as a probe to perform expression analyses. We observed that SaFLC was almost completely repressed after 1 week of vernalisation, but repression was stable only after 2 weeks, which is consistent with the fact that 2-week is the minimal duration of vernalisation that promotes flowering. Hence the molecular mechanisms of vernalisation seem to be conserved in Sinapis and Arabidopsis. [less ▲]

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See detailLes messagers de la floraison
Périlleux, Claire ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2005)

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See detailPartenariat F.N.P.S.M.S. - ULg - Rapport d'activité ULg 2004
Périlleux, Claire ULg; Hustin, Cécile; Van Kerkhoven, Fabrizio

Report (2005)

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See detailA physiological overview of the genetics of flowering time control.
Bernier, Georges ULg; Périlleux, Claire ULg

in Plant Biotechnology Journal (2005), 3(1), 3-16

Physiological studies on flowering time control have shown that plants integrate several environmental signals. Predictable factors, such as day length and vernalization, are regarded as 'primary', but ... [more ▼]

Physiological studies on flowering time control have shown that plants integrate several environmental signals. Predictable factors, such as day length and vernalization, are regarded as 'primary', but clearly interfere with, or can even be substituted by, less predictable factors. All plant parts participate in the sensing of these interacting factors. In the case of floral induction by photoperiod, long-distance signalling is known to occur between the leaves and the shoot apical meristem (SAM) via the phloem. In the long-day plant, Sinapis alba, this long-distance signalling has also been shown to involve the root system and to include sucrose, nitrate, glutamine and cytokinins, but not gibberellins. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a number of genetic pathways controlling flowering time have been identified. Models now extend beyond 'primary' controlling factors and show an ever-increasing number of cross-talks between pathways triggered or influenced by various environmental factors and hormones (mainly gibberellins). Most of the genes involved are preferentially expressed in meristems (the SAM and the root tip), but, surprisingly, only a few are expressed preferentially or exclusively in leaves. However, long-distance signalling from leaves to SAM has been shown to occur in Arabidopsis during the induction of flowering by long days. In this review, we propose a model integrating physiological data and genes activated by the photoperiodic pathway controlling flowering time in early-flowering accessions of Arabidopsis. This model involves metabolites, hormones and gene products interacting as long- or short-distance signalling molecules. [less ▲]

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