References of "Ongena, MARC"
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See detailDevelopment of formulated elicitors to control bioagressors of wheat: which interests?
Le Mire, Géraldine ULg; Deleu, Magali ULg; Ongena, Marc ULg et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

Crop plants are constantly exposed to a wide range of environmental stresses that can cause major productivity loss. Fungicide treatments are the most efficient disease control methods used up to now ... [more ▼]

Crop plants are constantly exposed to a wide range of environmental stresses that can cause major productivity loss. Fungicide treatments are the most efficient disease control methods used up to now. However, the environmental and health issues caused by these chemicals make it urgent to develop safer methods for pathogen control. In the optic of a sustainable agriculture, several biocontrol tools have been developed during the last decades. Elicitors are increasingly subject to research as interesting alternatives to phytosanitary products. Yet, few efficient formulations exist on the market, and no product has been designed specifically to protect wheat crops. This study will thus focus on the the manipulation of host natural defenses through the use of elicitors as a preventive treatment against major wheat diseases such as Septoria tritici, Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum. [less ▲]

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See detailInteractions of a potential plant elicitor mannolipid with plant model membranes
Polo Lozano, Damien ULg; Lins, Laurence ULg; Ongena, Marc ULg et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

The use of chemical pesticides causes problems for human health and environment. In this context, there is an increasing interest for alternative products such as biopesticides. Among them, elicitors act ... [more ▼]

The use of chemical pesticides causes problems for human health and environment. In this context, there is an increasing interest for alternative products such as biopesticides. Among them, elicitors act on the plants by inducing systemic resistance against diseases caused by fungal, viral, bacterial agents and insects. The target of the elicitors is supposed to be the plant plasma membranes (PPM). The main mechanisms of interaction of many elicitors involve proteic receptors but lipid-based elicitors (LBE) may preferably interact with the lipidic fractions of PPM. However there is no detailed information at the molecular level on the PPM-LBE interactions. Our work is focused on a original synthetic LBE composed of a mannoside linked to a myristic acid. It has potential elicitor activities as shown by the assays on tobacco root cells. These activities could be related to its interaction with the lipidic phase of PPM. Since PPM are complex entities, the analyses of the PPM- molecule interactions are quite difficult. In this context, these interactions were carried out using biomimetic membranes of PPM such as Langmuir monolayers and multilayers. The effects of our molecule on these membranar systems were investigated by biophysical and in silico approaches. [less ▲]

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See detailNew alternatives to chemical pesticides: deciphering the action mechanisms of lipid based plant elicitors via complementary biophysical and biological approaches.
Nasir, Mehmet Nail ULg; Polo Lozano, Damien ULg; Luzuriaga Loaiza, Walter ULg et al

Poster (2014, February)

Nowadays, many health and environmental problems are caused by the use of chemical pesticides. In this context, an increasing demand for alternative products such as biopesticides has been observed. Among ... [more ▼]

Nowadays, many health and environmental problems are caused by the use of chemical pesticides. In this context, an increasing demand for alternative products such as biopesticides has been observed. Among biopesticides, elicitor molecules which are able to trigger immune defense responses in plants are one of the most promising options. Although numerous elicitors have been discovered, the mechanisms involved in the perception, by plants, of only a few molecules have been identified. These elicitors usually interact with proteic receptors but we have recently shown that they may also act on the lipid phase of the plasma membrane. This project first aims to improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the recognition of specific lipid based elicitors (LBE). On that basis, the FIELD project will contribute to the design and the development of innovative compounds derived natural LBE. A multi-disciplinary approach, based on chemistry, bio-physics, bio-chemistry, and phytopathology will be followed by a consortium of different research groups from Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech in close collaboration with teams from foreign institutions. [less ▲]

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See detailMultifunctionality of lipopeptide antibiotics from rhizobacteria
Ongena, Marc ULg; Hofte, M.

Poster (2014)

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See detailBacillus-based biological control of plant diseases
Ongena, Marc ULg

Conference (2014)

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See detailAntimicrobial properties of Pseudomonas strains producing the antibiotic mupirocin
Matthijs, S.; Vander Wauven, C.; Cornu, B. et al

in Research in Microbiology (2014), 165

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See detailLes lipopeptides d’origine microbienne, des agents de biocontrôle aux multiples facettes
Jacques, Philippe ULg; Deravel, J.; Coutte, F. et al

in Phytoma (2014), 672

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See detailTo settle or to move? The interplay between two classes of cyclic lipopeptides in the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas CMR12a
D’aes, J.; Phuong Kieu, N.; Leclère, V. et al

in Environmental Microbiology (2014), In press

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See detailHost-induced bacterial cell wall decomposition mediates pattern-triggered immunity in Arabidopsis
Liu, X.; Grabherr, H.; Willmann, R. et al

in eLife (2014)

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See detailHigh-energy X-ray tomography analysis of a metal packing biofilm reactor for the production of lipopeptides by Bacillus subtilis
Zune, Quentin ULg; Soyeurt, Delphine; Toye, Dominique ULg et al

in Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology (2014), 89

BACKGROUND: Whereas multi-species biofilm reactors are commonly used for the treatment of liquid and solid wastes, new strategies are progressing for the development of single species biofilm for the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Whereas multi-species biofilm reactors are commonly used for the treatment of liquid and solid wastes, new strategies are progressing for the development of single species biofilm for the production of high-value metabolites. Technically, this new concept relies on the design of bioreactors able to promote biofilm formation and on the identification of the key physico-chemical parameters involved in biofilm formation. RESULTS: An experimental setting comprising a liquid continuously recirculated on a metal structured packing has been used to promote Bacillus subtilis GA1 biofilm formation. The colonization of the packing has been visualized non-invasively by X-ray tomography. This analysis revealed an uneven, conical, distribution of the biofilm inside the packing. Compared with a submerged culture carried out in a stirred tank reactor, significant modification of the lipopeptide profile has been observed in the biofilm reactorwith the disappearance of fengycin and iturin fractions and an increase of the surfactin fraction. In addition, considering the biofilm reactor design, no foam formation has been observed during the culture. CONCLUSIONS: The configuration of this biofilm reactor set-up allows for a higher surfactin production by comparison with a submerged culture while avoiding foam formation. Additionally, scale-up could easily be performed by increasing the number of packing elements. [less ▲]

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See detailIn Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of Plant Growth Promoting Bacillus Strains Isolated from Extreme Environments of Eastern Algeria.
Ait-Kaki, Asma; Kacem-Chaouche, Noreddine; Ongena, Marc ULg et al

in Applied biochemistry and biotechnology (2014), 172

This report is to our knowledge the first to study plant growth promotion and biocontrol characteristics of Bacillus isolates from extreme environments of Eastern Algeria. Seven isolates of 14 (50 %) were ... [more ▼]

This report is to our knowledge the first to study plant growth promotion and biocontrol characteristics of Bacillus isolates from extreme environments of Eastern Algeria. Seven isolates of 14 (50 %) were screened for their ability to inhibit growth of some phytopathogenic fungi on PDA and some roots exudates. The bacteria identification based on 16S r-RNA and gyrase-A gene sequence analysis showed that 71 % of the screened isolates belonged to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and the rest were closely related to B. atrophaeus and B. mojavensis. Most of them had high spore yields (22 x 108-27 x 108 spores/ml). They produced protease and cellulase cell wall-degrading enzymes while the chitinase activity was only observed in the B. atrophaeus (6SEL). A wide variety of lipopeptides homologous was detected by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry analysis. Interestingly, some additional peaks with new masses were characterized, which may correspond to new fengycin classes. The isolates produced siderophores and indole-3- acetic acid phytohormone. The greenhouse experiment using a naturally infested soil with Sclerotonia sclerotiorum showed that the B. atrophaeus (6SEL) significantly increased the size of the chickpea plants and reduced the stem rot disease (P < 0.05). These results suggest that these isolates may be used further as bio-inoculants to improve crop systems. [less ▲]

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See detailPlant defense stimulation by natural isolates of Bacillus depends on efficient surfactin production
Cawoy, Hélène ULg; Mariutto, Martin; Henry, Guillaume et al

in Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions [=MPMI] (2014), 27

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See detailTandem MS of -new- antibiotics from Bacillus guided by MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging
Debois, Delphine ULg; Jourdan, Emmanuel; Cawoy, Hélène ULg et al

Conference (2013, December 05)

Generally, an antibiotic is thought to have a role in antagonism simply because the producing strain is known to exhibit a potential for pathogen growth inhibition. Some genetic approaches such as PCR ... [more ▼]

Generally, an antibiotic is thought to have a role in antagonism simply because the producing strain is known to exhibit a potential for pathogen growth inhibition. Some genetic approaches such as PCR using specific primers or genome mining using known sequence data of close relatives are also used. Nevertheless, none of these methods allows stating for a link between a specific compound and the observed antagonism. Yet MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool to decipher the chemical messengers exchanged by two protagonists [1,2,3;]. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) may be also used, either on extracts [2,3] or directly on the microbial colonies [4]. The presentation will thus be focused on two examples of application of MALDI MSI combined to in situ tandem mass spectrometry. The first presented case will be the antagonism between soilborne strain Paenibacillus polymyxa Pp56 and the fungal phytopathogen Fusarium oxysporum. Using MALDI MSI, we were able to precisely localize each detected antibiotic, allowing discriminating which LI-F lipopeptides (fusaricidin) were really active against the pathogen progression. Besides, the use of in situ MS/MS allowed us to sequence the peptide moiety of several LI-F lipopeptides, showing that some of them are actually a mixture of several forms. The second example concerns the metabolites that are released by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens S499 cells following their inoculation on 7 days old tomato roots. We developed specific bioassays for time-course monitoring by MALDI MSI. First analyses revealed an efficient secretion of surfactin by Bacillus cells after 3 days when colonization as biofilm-structured populations is well established. Even if the composition of antibiotic mixture does not greatly evolve over time, after long incubation periods (32 or 35 days post inoculation), new series of compounds are detected in the tomato root -surrounding medium. Structural analysis based on exact mass measurements and MS/MS experiments, performed directly on the semi-solid agar medium, allowed us to identify these compounds as new variants of surfactins. [1] Barger, S., et al., Anton Leeuw Int J G, 2012, 102, 435-445. [2] Hoefler, B. C., et al,. Natl Acad Sci USA, 2012, 109, 13082-13087. [3] Moree, W. J., et al., Natl Acad Sci USA, 2012, 109, 13811-13816. [4] Debois, D., et al., J Am Soc Mass Spectrom. 2013, 24, 1202-1213 [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterisation of fengycin homologues produced by B. amyloliquefaciens (ET) strain isolated from a salt lake (Eastern Algeria)
Ait Kaki, Asma ULg; Noreddine, K.C.; Kara Ali, M. et al

Poster (2013, November 15)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (8 ULg)