References of "Nys, Monique"
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See detailSystemic release of endotoxins induced by gentle mastication: Association with periodontitis severity
Geerts, Sabine ULg; Nys, Monique ULg; De Mol, Patrick ULg et al

in Journal of Dental Research (2002, December), 81(Sp. Iss. B), 235-235

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See detailOxidative Processes in Human Promonocytic Cells (Thp-1) after Differentiation into Macrophages by Incubation with Chlamydia Pneumoniae Extracts
Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange ULg; Deby-Dupont, Ginette; Nys, Monique ULg et al

in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (2001), 287(3), 781-8

Human monocytes differentiated into macrophages by Chlamydia pneumoniae were able to oxidize blood lipoproteins, as discovered by Kalayoglu et al. (1998). Using a model of human promonocytic cells (THP-1 ... [more ▼]

Human monocytes differentiated into macrophages by Chlamydia pneumoniae were able to oxidize blood lipoproteins, as discovered by Kalayoglu et al. (1998). Using a model of human promonocytic cells (THP-1), the cells were differentiated into macrophages by preincubation with C. pneumoniae extract, and further stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate. In these conditions, the differentiated cells oxidized a thiol compound and released superoxide anion as demonstrated respectively by gas liquid chromatography and electron spin resonance. The thiol oxidation and superoxide anion release were inhibited by diphenyliodonium, a NADPH oxidase and NOsynthase inhibitor, proving that the respiratory burst and the NOsynthase were involved in the oxidation processes occurring in the differentiated THP-1. The role of H(2)O(2) (derived from superoxide anion) was indicated by the enhancing effect of a peroxidase on the thiol oxidation. The presence of alpha-tocopherol in the surrounding medium strongly diminished the oxidation of the thiol target. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationship between procalcitonin plasma level and severity of infection
Servais, P.; Nys, Monique ULg; Canivet, Jean-Luc ULg et al

in Intensive Care Medicine (2001), 27(suppl.), 560

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See detailCorrelation between endotoxin level and bacterial count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of ventilated patients
Nys, Monique ULg; Ledoux, Didier ULg; Damas, Pierre ULg et al

in Critical Care Medicine (2000), 28(8), 2825-2830

OBJECTIVE: To assess the predictive value of the endotoxin level in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and to propose to the clinician a guide in the diagnosis of gram-negative bacterial (GNB) pneumonia ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To assess the predictive value of the endotoxin level in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and to propose to the clinician a guide in the diagnosis of gram-negative bacterial (GNB) pneumonia. DESIGN: Retrospective and prospective studies to investigate the relation between endotoxin level and quantitative bacterial culture of BAL and to test the predictive value of a defined threshold. SETTING: University hospital general intensive care unit. PATIENTS: In the first part of the study, 77 consecutive ventilated patients with clinical suspicion of nosocomial pneumonia between January 1995 and January 1996. In the second part of the study, 93 consecutive ventilated patients studied prospectively between February 1996 and April 1997. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Quantitative cultures for aerobic bacteria were performed directly from the fluid. Bacterial species were determined with standard techniques. The detection of endotoxin in BAL was made using a quantitative chromogenic Limulus assay. In the retrospective analysis, a significant correlation between quantitative GNB cultures and BAL endotoxin levels was observed (r2 = 0.60, p < .0001). An endotoxin level > or = 4 endotoxin units/mL (EU/mL) distinguishes patients with a significant GNB count from colonized patients with a sensitivity of 92.6%, a specificity of 81.4% and a correct classification rate of 84.9%. In the prospective analysis, the 4 EU/mL threshold permits identification of infected patients with a sensitivity of 82.2%, a specificity of 95.6%, and a correct classification rate of 90.3%. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the Limulus assay still had a good discrimination power in the prediction of significant bacterial count in BAL fluid. CONCLUSIONS: Endotoxin detection immediately after bronchoscopy is a distinct advantage to the clinician because antimicrobial gram-negative therapy may be immediately justified according to the results. [less ▲]

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See detailNitrated proteins in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients at risk of ventilator-associated bronchopneumonia.
Mathy, Marianne ULg; Damas, Pierre ULg; Nys, Monique ULg et al

in European Respiratory Journal (2000), 16(2), 296-301

The study was designed to identify markers of oxidative injury, related to the nitric oxide derived cascade, in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from intensive care patients suspected of ventilator ... [more ▼]

The study was designed to identify markers of oxidative injury, related to the nitric oxide derived cascade, in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from intensive care patients suspected of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and/or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Thirty-eight patients developing VAP and/or ARDS (VAP/ARDS group) were compared to 20 ventilated patients without VAP/ARDS (control group). Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and elastase, taken as markers of neutrophil activation were measured by enzymatic techniques, and nitrated proteins (NTPs) by an immunological method. The cytotoxicity of the BAL fluid was tested using cultured human epithelial alveolar cells by the release of pre-incorporated 51Cr. Mean NTP concentration and, MPO and elastase activities were different between the VAP/ARDS and control groups (p<0.05 for NTPs; p<0.005 for MPO; p<0.005 for elastase). NTP concentration correlated with MPO and elastase activity and neutrophil number (r=0.93, 0.91 and 0.87, respectively), but not to protein concentration and arterial oxygen tension/inspiratory oxygen fraction. The cytotoxicity of BAL correlated with NTP concentration (r=0.92) and MPO activity (r=0.89). It was concluded that the concentrations of nitrated proteins in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid correlated with the oxidant activity of neutrophils and that, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytotoxicity was correlated with the nitrated protein concentration and may be mediated by oxidants. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of human anti-lipopolysaccharide immunoglobulins on tissue distribution and clearance of lipopolysaccharide in rats
Nys, Monique ULg; Damas, Jacques ULg; Damas, Pierre ULg et al

in Medical Microbiology & Immunology (1999), 188(2), 65-71

To examine the influence of passive immunization on the biological fate of injected lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we used a human IgG preparation (anti-LPS IgG) rich in antibodies to a large panel of smooth ... [more ▼]

To examine the influence of passive immunization on the biological fate of injected lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we used a human IgG preparation (anti-LPS IgG) rich in antibodies to a large panel of smooth and rough purified LPS extracts as well as a normal IgG preparation (standard IgG). Our approach was to compare the uptake of 125I-labeled LPS by the tissues of saline or IgG-treated rats. After intravenous injection, one fraction of 125I-labeled Escherichia coli O55:B5 LPS is rapidly taken up by tissues, while another fraction remained in the blood. Uptake of 125I-labeled LPS was principally observed into the liver and spleen. In rats treated prophylactically with standard IgG, these tissues accumulated significantly larger amount of LPS than the tissues of rats treated with anti-LPS IgG. Nevertheless, both IgG preparations increased the specific binding of LPS by the liver and spleen. High levels of homologous unlabeled LPS decreased the uptake of LPS by the liver, presumably by occupying tissue receptors, whereas in the presence of E. coli O127:B8 LPS, an increase of the uptake of 125I-labeled LPS by the liver and lungs was observed. The pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of LPS-IgG complexes pre-formed in vitro were compared. In the presence of standard IgG, a unexpected increase of the uptake of LPS by the tissues was recorded, whereas LPS-anti-LPS IgG complexes decreased the binding of 125I-labeled LPS to the tissues. On the other hand, the vascular effects induced by LPS did not appear to be modified in rats pretreated with either IgG preparation. In conclusion, although passive immunization against LPS slightly modified the uptake and clearance of LPS, neither in vitro nor in vivo formation of LPS-anti-LPS IgG complexes afforded a very significant protection against the toxic effects of LPS. [less ▲]

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See detailStudy of the protective effects of hyperimmune immunoglobulins G and M against endotoxin in mice and rats
Nys, Monique ULg; Damas, Jacques ULg; Damas, Pierre ULg et al

in Medical Microbiology & Immunology (1999), 188(2), 55-64

We prepared solutions of human IgM and IgG to various lipopolysaccharide (LPS) species. These were then tested, along with solutions of non-LPS specific human IgG or IgM, for their ability to confer ... [more ▼]

We prepared solutions of human IgM and IgG to various lipopolysaccharide (LPS) species. These were then tested, along with solutions of non-LPS specific human IgG or IgM, for their ability to confer passive immunity against experimental endotoxemia in two animal models. The immunoglobulins were first tested for an effect on the lethality induced by seven different LPSs in actinomycin-D sensitized mice, or by three different bacteria in normal mice. When the immunoglobulins were administered 1 h before challenge, a small protective effect was observed. This protection was dependent upon both the anti-LPS agent, the chemical composition of the LPS, or the strain of gram-negative bacteria used for injection. The anti-LPS IgM and IgG preparations reduced the mortality induced by Escherichia coli but not by Serratia marcescens or Klebsiella pneumoniae, indicating protection by strain-specific antibodies. When the antibodies were preincubated with LPS or bacteria for 30 min before administration, almost complete protection was seen. The influence of these immunoglobulin preparations or of human albumin (as a control) on the hypotensive and vascular-permeabilizing effects of LPS in rats was then studied. A dose-dependent inhibitory effect was observed with IgG preparations and albumin. At 200 mg/kg, anti-LPS IgG reduced the effects of LPS, while at 400 mg/kg, both anti-LPS and normal IgG preparations showed protection, as did human albumin used at the same dose. The IgM-enriched preparation worsened the initial hypotensive phase after LPS, whereas the anti-LPS IgM significantly reduced the second phase of the hypotension, but only at the largest dose of 400 mg/kg. In this second model using the rat, a clear difference between the activity of IgG and IgM was thus observed. We conclude that pretreatment with human immunoglobulins from large plasma pools modestly, but significantly, attenuated the effects of murine and rat Gram-negative sepsis, but that protection was incomplete. Our results suggest that single regimen intervention strategies may not be sufficient to influence the course of the disease. [less ▲]

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See detailMild Endotoxaemia and the Inflammatory Response Induced by a Marathon Race
Camus, G.; Poortmans, J.; Nys, Monique ULg et al

in Clinical Science (1997), 92(4), 415-22

1. To address the question of whether endotoxaemia could be involved in the inflammatory response induced by long-term strenuous exercise, 18 male marathon runners [mean age 41 +/- 2 (SEM) years] were ... [more ▼]

1. To address the question of whether endotoxaemia could be involved in the inflammatory response induced by long-term strenuous exercise, 18 male marathon runners [mean age 41 +/- 2 (SEM) years] were studied. Their performance in the marathon ranged from 2 h 46 min to 4 h 42 min. 2. Four venous blood samples were drawn: at rest, just before the race (baseline); within 15 min following the completion of the marathon; after 1 h of recovery; and the morning after the race. 3. The following humoral markers of the inflammatory response to exercise were measured: polymorphonuclear myeloperoxidase (MPO), anaphylatoxin C5a (C5a), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Plasma endotoxin was measured by a sensitive and rapid chromogenic Limulus assay. All inflammatory markers were significantly increased (P < 0.001) after the race, reaching in most cases peak values in the first blood sample drawn following the completion of the marathon [MPO, 298 +/- 19 ng/ml (SEM); C5a, 1.45 +/- 0.32 ng/ml; TNF-alpha, 20 +/- 3 pg/ml; IL-6, 88 +/- 13 pg/ml] when compared with baseline [MPO, 146 +/- 16 ng/ml (SEM); C5a, 0.27 +/- 0.2 ng/ml; TNF-alpha, 12 +/- 1.5 pg/ml: IL-6, 1.0 +/- 0.5 pg/ml]. Traces of plasma endotoxin (ranging from 5 to 13 pg/ml, with one exceptionally high value of 72 pg/ml measured in one runner) were detected in seven subjects within the first hour of recovery. An ELISA method was used to determine the endogenous IgG antibodies toward a range of Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) of different sizes and structures. A transient decrease in certain anti-LPS activities, mainly against rough LPS, occurred in most cases in the first blood sample drawn after the race. There was no correlation between the magnitude of the inflammatory response to exercise, as assessed by the increase in blood levels of humoral markers of inflammation, and the changes in circulating endotoxin levels of anti-LPS IgG activity following the race. 4. From these results, we conclude that the mild, transient endotoxaemia detected in some of our subjects does not play a major role in the observed inflammatory response to a marathon competition. [less ▲]

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See detailScreening and characterization of specific anti-lipopolysaccharide antibodies in Belgian blood donors by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays
Nys, Monique ULg; Laub, R.; Damas, Pierre ULg et al

in European Journal of Clinical Investigation (1996), 26(12), 1134-1142

The goal of this project was to find and collect high concentrations of endotoxin-specific antibodies for therapeutic IgG- or IgM-enriched preparations. Various enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs ... [more ▼]

The goal of this project was to find and collect high concentrations of endotoxin-specific antibodies for therapeutic IgG- or IgM-enriched preparations. Various enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were developed to perform longitudinal studies of the serological response to a large panel of smooth and rough purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extracts in a population of healthy blood donors. To accomplish this, 1612 human serum samples from volunteer blood donors collected by seven different blood banks in Belgium were screened and specific IgM and IgG activities were measured. Approximately 17% of the donors had anti-LPS concentrations higher than 40 mg L-1. Of these, 10.9% had anti-smooth LPS antibodies, 3.7% had anti-rough LPS antibodies and 2.8% were found to be positive towards both types of LPS. The mean anti-LPS antibody concentration was 8 mg L-1 for rough LPS and 14 mg L-1 for smooth LPS. Age- and sex-related distributions of the activities indicated that the greatest prevalence of high anti-LPS concentration was in women aged 40-49 years and in men older than 60 years. Differential absorption experiments showed that the pooled serum of selected blood donors contained a mixture of specific and cross-reacting antibodies. We detected predominantly anti-LPS activities due to the IgG1 and IgG2 subclasses. The range of specificities to different LPS was increased by the pooling of selected sera. It was concluded that pools of naturally occurring specific anti-LPS immunoglobulin antibodies may be obtained in Belgium by screening blood donors using ELISAs that we have developed. [less ▲]

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See detailSequential anti-core glycolipid immunoglobulin antibody activities in patients with and without septic shock and their relation to outcome
Nys, Monique ULg; Damas, Pierre ULg; Joassin, Luc et al

in Annals of Surgery (1993), 217(3), 300-306

OBJECTIVE: This study follows the sequential changes in anti-lipopolysaccharide antibodies in infected patients with and without septic shock. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: A relation between high endogenous ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: This study follows the sequential changes in anti-lipopolysaccharide antibodies in infected patients with and without septic shock. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: A relation between high endogenous levels of anti-LPS antibodies and protection against bacteremia and septic shock in at-risk patient groups has been observed. However, information on the daily follow-up and kinetics of apparition or disappearance of anti-LPS antibody activities and their relations with the protective properties of the different immunoglobulin classes has not been clearly investigated. METHODS: Two hundred and five septic surgical patients were studied during their stay in the intensive care unit during a period of 3 years. Among these patients, septic shock developed in 54 and 47 died. A sensitive ELISA was used to study circulating IgM and IgG antibodies to the core glycolipid (CGL) region of Salmonella minnesota R595. The activities were measured each day when sepsis occurred and every hour during septic shock. RESULTS: Anti-CGL IgM activity was found in 32% of the septic patients. This response, however, most often appeared to be transient. A strong correlation was observed between the occurrence of septic shock and the absence of anti-CGL IgM activity on admission to the ICU (p < 0.02). Anti-CGL IgG activity was detected in 82% of the patients and better correlated with outcome for patients with high or rising activities during their hospitalization (p < 0.0005). In patients with septic shock or irreversible organ failure, a fall in the anti-CGL IgG activity was observed before death, suggesting that the IgG antibodies were consumed during this acute event. Therefore, the anti-CGL IgG activity measured by ELISA could be used as a marker of the evolution of the illness. CONCLUSIONS: Our observations demonstrate the interest to follow-up the evolution of the anti-CGL antibodies during sepsis. The fall of these antibodies during septic shock and in patients who died was an additional argument to perform, as an additive form, passive antibody therapy to decrease lethality in this group of patients. [less ▲]

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See detailCytokine serum level during severe sepsis in human Il-6 as a marker of severity
Damas, Pierre ULg; Ledoux, Didier ULg; Nys, Monique ULg et al

in Annals of Surgery (1992), 215(4), 356-362

Forty critically ill surgical patients with documented infections were studied during their stay in an intensive care unit. Among these patients, 19 developed septic shock and 16 died, 9 of them from ... [more ▼]

Forty critically ill surgical patients with documented infections were studied during their stay in an intensive care unit. Among these patients, 19 developed septic shock and 16 died, 9 of them from septic shock. Interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta), tumor necrosis factor (TNF alpha), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) were measured each day and every 1 or 2 hours when septic shock occurred. Although IL-1 beta was never found, TNF alpha was most often observed in the serum at a level under 100 pg/mL except during septic shock. During these acute episodes TNF alpha level reached several hundred pg/mL, but only for a few hours. In contrast, IL-6 was always increased in the serum of acutely ill patients (peak to 500,000 pg/mL). There was a direct correlation between IL-6 peak serum level and TNF alpha peak serum level during septic shock and between IL-6 serum level and temperature or C-reactive protein serum level. Moreover, IL-6 correlated well with APACHE II score, and the mortality rate increased significantly in the group of patients who presented with IL-6 serum level above 1000 pg/mL. Thus, IL-6 appears to be a good marker of severity during bacterial infection. [less ▲]

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See detailProduction of heterobispecific monoclonal antibodies by mouse hybrid hybridomas (quadromas)
Cloes, Jean-Michel; Herens, Christian ULg; Nys, Monique ULg et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie, de Biochimie et de Biophysique (1988), 96

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See detailA direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Elisa) for antibodies to enterobacterial score glycolipid and lipid A. Results in Healthy Subjects and in Patients Infected by Gram-Negative Bacteria
Nys, Monique ULg; Damas, Pierre ULg; Damas, François ULg et al

in Medical Microbiology & Immunology (1987), 176(5), 257-271

We have developed an ELISA for IgM and IgG antibodies to the core glycolipid (CGL) of the Re mutant Salmonella minnesota R 595, and to lipid A. Anti-CGL antibodies have been detected in sera from 37% of ... [more ▼]

We have developed an ELISA for IgM and IgG antibodies to the core glycolipid (CGL) of the Re mutant Salmonella minnesota R 595, and to lipid A. Anti-CGL antibodies have been detected in sera from 37% of healthy blood donors, whereas anti-lipid A activities were found in 13% of individuals only. The anti-CGL and anti-lipid A activities were examined in patients in a surgical intensive care unit, selected on the basis of a definite risk of infectious complications due to Gram-negative bacteria. Of the patients who developed such infections, the rate of favourable outcome was significantly higher in patients with either stable positive or increasing anti-CGL activities than in patients found to be negative. Our results provide clear evidence that anti-CGL antibodies contribute to host defence against various Gram-negative bacteria. [less ▲]

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