References of "Noël, Agnès"
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See detailMT1-MMP protects breast carcinoma cells against type I collagen-induced apoptosis
Maquoi, Erik ULg; Assent, Delphine; Detilleux, Julien et al

in Oncogene (2012), 31(4), 480-93

As invading breast carcinoma cells breach their underlying basement membrane, they become confronted with a dense three-dimensional reactive stroma dominated by type I collagen. To develop metastatic ... [more ▼]

As invading breast carcinoma cells breach their underlying basement membrane, they become confronted with a dense three-dimensional reactive stroma dominated by type I collagen. To develop metastatic capabilities, invading tumor cells must acquire the capacity to negotiate this novel microenvironment. Collagen influences the fate of epithelial cells by inducing apoptosis. However, the mechanisms used by invading tumor cells to evade collagen-induced apoptosis remain to be defined. We demonstrate that membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP/MMP-14) confers breast cancer cells with the ability to escape apoptosis when embedded in a collagen gel and after orthotopic implantation in vivo. In the absence of MMP-14-dependent proteolysis, type I collagen triggers apoptosis by inducing the expression of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-interacting killer in luminal-like breast cancer cells. These findings reveal a new mechanism whereby MMP-14 activity promotes tumor progression by circumventing apoptosis. [less ▲]

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See detailMiR-146a an angiostatic miRNA elevated in peripartum cardiomyopathy
Halkein, Julie ULg; Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg; Haghikia, Arash et al

Poster (2012, January)

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See detailStromal Estrogen Receptor-α Promotes Tumor Growth by Normalizing an Increased Angiogenesis.
Pequeux, Christel ULg; Raymond-Letron, I; Blacher, Silvia ULg et al

in Cancer Research (2012), 72(12), 3010-3019

Estrogens directly promote the growth of breast cancers that express the Estrogen Receptor 􏰀 (ERalpha). However, the contribution of stromal expression of ERalpha in the tumor microenvironment to the pro ... [more ▼]

Estrogens directly promote the growth of breast cancers that express the Estrogen Receptor 􏰀 (ERalpha). However, the contribution of stromal expression of ERalpha in the tumor microenvironment to the pro-tumoral effects of estrogen has never been explored. In this study, we evaluated the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which 17beta-estradiol (E2) impacts the microenvironment and modulates tumor development of ERalpha-negative tumors. Using different mouse models of ER-negative cancer cells grafted subcutaneously into syngeneic ovariectomized immunocompetent mice, we found that E2 potentiates tumor growth, increases intratumoral vessel density and modifies tumor vasculature into a more regularly organized structure, thereby improving vessel stabilization to prevent tumor hypoxia and necrosis. These E2-induced effects were completely abrogated in ERalpha-deficient mice, demonstrating a critical role of host ERα. Notably, E2 did not accelerate tumor growth when ERalpha was deficient in Tie2- positive cells, but still expressed by bone marrow derived cells. These results were extended by clinical evidence of ERalpha-positive stromal cell labeling in the microenvironment of human breast cancers. Together, our findings therefore suggest that E2 promotes the growth of ERalpha-negative cancer cells through the activation of stromal ERα (not hematopoiteic but Tie2-dependent expression of ERalpha), which normalizes tumor angiogenesis and allows an adaptation of blood supply to tumor demand preventing hypoxia and necrosis. These findings significantly deepen mechanistic insights into the impact of E2 on tumor development with potential consequences for cancer treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailIsoform 111 of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF111) improves angiogenesis of ovarian tissue xenotransplantation
Labied, Soraya ULg; Delforge, Yves ULg; Blacher, Silvia ULg et al

in Journal of Assisted Reproduction & Genetics (2012), 28(11), 1009

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See detailDoes vascular endothelial growth factor improve ovarian tissue recovery after cryopreservation?
Henry, Laurie ULg; Fransolet, Maïté ULg; Labied, Soraya ULg et al

in Giornale italiano di obstetricia e gynecologia (2012)

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See detailModelling Lymphatic and blood capillary patterning
Bruyere, Françoise; Maillard, Catherine ULg; Erpicum, Charlotte ULg et al

in Davies, Jamie (Ed.) Replacing Animal Models, a practical guide to creating and using culture-based biomimetic alternatives (2012)

Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, the formation of new blood or lymphatic vessels from preexisting ones, are important biological processes associated with diverse physiological processes, tissue repair ... [more ▼]

Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, the formation of new blood or lymphatic vessels from preexisting ones, are important biological processes associated with diverse physiological processes, tissue repair and pathologies, such as cancer. Much progress has been made in recent years in identifying molecules specifically expressed on blood and lymphatic vessels and in the setting up of models of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. In this review, we describe the most common in vitro models of (lymph)angiogenesis that have proven suitable for investigating angiogenic and lymphatic biology, and offer alternatives to animal experimentation. Their rationales, limitations and applications in biomedical research are discussed. A special emphasis will be given on ring assays that provide excellent recapitulation of various steps of (lymph)angiogenesis. The aortic ring assay has become the most widely used methods to study in vitro angiogenesis, and the recently set up lymphatic ring assay provides the opportunity to extend the in vitro studies to lymphangiogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailADAMTS-12 metalloprotease is necessary for normal inflammatory response.
Moncada-Pazos, Angela; Obaya, Alvaro J.; Llamazares, Maria et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2012), 287(47), 39554-63

ADAMTSs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin domains) are a family of enzymes with both proteolytic and protein interaction functions, which have been implicated in distinct pathologies ... [more ▼]

ADAMTSs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin domains) are a family of enzymes with both proteolytic and protein interaction functions, which have been implicated in distinct pathologies. In this work, we have investigated the putative role of ADAMTS-12 in inflammation by using a mouse model deficient in this metalloprotease. Control and mutant mice were subjected to different experimental conditions to induce colitis, endotoxic sepsis, and pancreatitis. We have observed that Adamts12-deficient mice exhibit more severe inflammation and a delayed recovery from these challenges compared with their wild-type littermates. These changes are accompanied by an increase in inflammatory markers including several cytokines, as assessed by microarray expression analysis and proteomic-based approaches. Interestingly, the clinical symptoms observed in Adamts12-deficient mice are also concomitant with an elevation in the number of neutrophils in affected tissues. Finally, isolation and in vitro culture of human neutrophils demonstrate that the presence of ADAMTS-12 induces neutrophil apoptosis. On the basis of these results, we propose that ADAMTS-12 is implicated in the inflammatory response by modulating normal neutrophil apoptosis. [less ▲]

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See detailControl of Allergen-Induced Inflammation and Hyperresponsiveness by the Metalloproteinase ADAMTS-12
Paulissen, Geneviève ULg; El Hour, Mehdi; Rocks, Natacha ULg et al

in Journal of Immunology (2012), 189

A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) constitute a family of endopeptidases related to matrix metalloproteinases. These proteinases have been largely implicated in tissue ... [more ▼]

A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) constitute a family of endopeptidases related to matrix metalloproteinases. These proteinases have been largely implicated in tissue remodeling associated with pathological processes. Among them, ADAMTS12 was identified as an asthma-associated gene in a human genome screening program. However, its functional implication in asthma is not yet documented. The present study aims at investigating potential ADAMTS-12 functions in experimental models of allergic airways disease. Two different in vivo protocols of allergen-induced airways disease were applied to the recently generated Adamts12-deficient mice and corresponding wild-type mice. In this study, we provide evidence for a protective effect of ADAMTS-12 against bronchial inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. In the absence of Adamts12, challenge with different allergens (OVA and house dust mite) led to exacerbated eosinophilic inflammation in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and in lung tissue, along with airway dysfunction assessed by increased airway responsiveness following methacholine exposure. Furthermore, mast cell counts and ST2 receptor and IL-33 levels were higher in the lungs of allergen-challenged Adamts12-deficient mice. The present study provides, to our knowledge, the first experimental evidence for a contribution of ADAMTS-12 as a key mediator in airways disease, interfering with immunological processes leading to inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. [less ▲]

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See detailA dynamic in vivo model of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions in circulating tumor cells and metastases of breast cancer.
Bonnomet, Arnaud; Syne, Laïdya ULg; Brysse, Anne ULg et al

in Oncogene (2012), 31(33), 3741-53

Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes endow epithelial cells with enhanced migratory/invasive properties and are therefore likely to contribute to tumor invasion and metastatic spread ... [more ▼]

Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes endow epithelial cells with enhanced migratory/invasive properties and are therefore likely to contribute to tumor invasion and metastatic spread. Because of the difficulty in following EMT processes in human tumors, we have developed and characterized an animal model with transplantable human breast tumor cells (MDA-MB-468) uniquely showing spontaneous EMT events to occur. Using vimentin as a marker of EMT, heterogeneity was revealed in the primary MDA-MB-468 xenografts with vimentin-negative and vimentin-positive areas, as also observed on clinical human invasive breast tumor specimens. Reverse transcriptase-PCR after microdissection of these populations from the xenografts revealed EMT traits in the vimentin-positive zones characterized by enhanced 'mesenchymal gene' expression (Snail, Slug and fibroblast-specific protein-1) and diminished expression of epithelial molecules (E-cadherin, ZO-3 and JAM-A). Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were detected in the blood as soon as 8 days after s.c. injection, and lung metastases developed in all animals injected as examined by in vivo imaging analyses and histology. High levels of vimentin RNA were detected in CTCs by reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR as well as, to a lesser extent, Snail and Slug RNA. Von Willebrand Factor/vimentin double immunostainings further showed that tumor cells in vascular tumoral emboli all expressed vimentin. Tumoral emboli in the lungs also expressed vimentin whereas macrometastases displayed heterogenous vimentin expression, as seen in the primary xenografts. In conclusion, our data uniquely demonstrate in an in vivo context that EMT occurs in the primary tumors, and associates with an enhanced ability to intravasate and generate CTCs. They further suggest that mesenchymal-to-epithelial phenomena occur in secondary organs, facilitating the metastatic growth [less ▲]

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See detailCurcumin-cyclodextrin complexes potentiate gemcitabine effects in an orthotopic mouse model of lung cancer.
Rocks, Natacha ULg; Bekaert, Sandrine ULg; Coia, I et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2012), 107(7), 1083-92

Background:Overall clinical outcome for advanced lung cancer remains very disappointing despite recent advances in treatment. Curcumin has been reported as potentially active against cancer.Methods:Owing ... [more ▼]

Background:Overall clinical outcome for advanced lung cancer remains very disappointing despite recent advances in treatment. Curcumin has been reported as potentially active against cancer.Methods:Owing to poor curcumin solubility, we have used cyclodextrins (CD) as an excipient allowing a considerable increase of aqueous solubility and bioavailability of curcumin. The effects of solubilised curcumin have been evaluated in cell cultures as well as in an in vivo orthotopic lung tumour mouse model.Results:Cell proliferation was reduced while apoptosis rates were increased when lung epithelial tumour cells were cultured in the presence of curcumin-CD complexes. For in vivo experiments, cells were grafted into lungs of C57Bl/6 mice treated by an oral administration of a non-soluble form of curcumin, CDs alone or curcumin-CD complexes, combined or not with gemcitabine. The size of orthotopically implanted lung tumours was reduced upon curcumin complex administration as compared with treatments with placebo or non-solubilised curcumin. Moreover, curcumin potentiated the gemcitabine-mediated antitumour effects.Conclusion:Our data demonstrate that curcumin, when given orally in a CD-solubilised form, reduces lung tumour size in vivo. In vitro experiments show impaired tumour cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis. Moreover, our data underline a potential additive effect of curcumin with gemcitabine thus providing an efficient therapeutic option for antilung cancer therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailMicroRNA-146a, a downstream effector of 16kDa prolactin, impairs the endothelium-cardiomyocyte cross-talk in peripartum cardiomyopathy
Struman, Ingrid ULg; Halkein, Julie ULg; Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg et al

in FASEB meeting:the Growth Hormone/Prolactin Family in Biology and Disease. (2012)

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See detailBone Marrow-derived Myofibroblasts Are the Providers of Pro-invasive Matrix Metalloproteinase 13 in Primary Tumor.
Lecomte, Julie ULg; Masset, Anne; Blacher, Silvia ULg et al

in Neoplasia : An International Journal for Oncology Research (2012), 14(10), 943-51

Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts are key contributors of the tumor microenvironment that regulates carcinoma progression. They consist of a heterogeneous cell population with diverse origins, phenotypes ... [more ▼]

Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts are key contributors of the tumor microenvironment that regulates carcinoma progression. They consist of a heterogeneous cell population with diverse origins, phenotypes, and functions. In the present report, we have explored the contribution of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells to generate different fibroblast subsets that putatively produce the matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) and affect cancer cell invasion. A murine model of skin carcinoma was applied to mice, irradiated, and engrafted with BM isolated from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice. We provide evidence that one third of BM-derived GFP(+) cells infiltrating the tumor expressed the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan NG2 (pericytic marker) or alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA, myofibroblast marker), whereas almost 90% of Thy1(+) fibroblasts were originating from resident GFP-negative cells. MMP13producing cells were exclusively alpha-SMA(+) cells and derived from GFP(+) BM cells. To investigate their impact on tumor invasion, we isolated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from the BM of wild-type and MMP13-deficient mice. Wild-type MSC promoted cancer cell invasion in a spheroid assay, whereas MSCs obtained from MMP13-deficient mice failed to. Our data support the concept of fibroblast subset specialization with BM-derived alpha-SMA(+) cells being the main source of MMP13, a stromal mediator of cancer cell invasion. [less ▲]

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See detailNebulized Anti-IL-13 Monoclonal Antibody Fab' Fragment Reduces Allergen-Induced Asthma
Hacha, Jonathan ULg; Tomlinson, K; Maertens, Ludovic ULg et al

in American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology (2012), sous presse

Rationale: Interleukin-13 (IL-13) is a prototypic Th2 cytokine and a central mediator of the complex cascade of events leading to asthmatic phenotype. Indeed, IL-13 plays key roles in IgE synthesis ... [more ▼]

Rationale: Interleukin-13 (IL-13) is a prototypic Th2 cytokine and a central mediator of the complex cascade of events leading to asthmatic phenotype. Indeed, IL-13 plays key roles in IgE synthesis, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, mucus hypersecretion, subepithelial fibrosis and eosinophil infiltration. Objectives: We assessed the potential efficacy of inhaled anti-IL-13 monoclonal antibody Fab' fragment on allergen-induced airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness and remodeling in an experimental model of allergic asthma. Anti-IL-13 Fab' was administered to mice as a liquid aerosol generated by inExpose® inhalation system in a tower allowing a nose-only exposure. Methods: BALB/c mice were treated by PBS, anti-IL-13 Fab' or A33 Fab' fragment and subjected to ovalbumin (OVA) exposure for 1 and 5 weeks (short term (ST) and long term (LT) protocols). Measurements and Main Results: Our data demonstrate a significant anti-asthma effect following nebulization of anti-IL-13 Fab' in a model of asthma driven by allergen exposure as compared to saline and non-immune Fab fragments. In short and long terms protocols, administration of the anti-IL-13 Fab' by inhalation significantly decreased bronchial responsiveness to methacholine, BALF eosinophilia, inflammatory cell infiltration in lung tissue, and many features of airway remodeling. Levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and matrix metalloprotease levels were significantly lower in lung parenchyma of mice treated with anti-IL-13 Fab'. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that an inhaled anti-IL-13 Fab' significantly reduces airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness and remodeling. Specific neutralization of IL-13 in the lungs using an inhaled anti-IL-13 Fab' could represent a novel and effective therapy for the treatment of asthma. [less ▲]

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See detailThe proteolytic activity of MT4-MMP is required for its proangiogenic and pro-metastatic promoting effects
Host, Lorin; Paye, Alexandra ULg; Detry, Benoît ULg et al

in International Journal of Cancer = Journal International du Cancer (2012), 131(7), 1537-1548

MT4-MMP expression in breast adenocarcinoma stimulates tumor growth and metastatic spreading to the lung. However whether these pro-tumorigenic and pro-metastatic effects of MT4-MMP are related to a ... [more ▼]

MT4-MMP expression in breast adenocarcinoma stimulates tumor growth and metastatic spreading to the lung. However whether these pro-tumorigenic and pro-metastatic effects of MT4-MMP are related to a proteolytic action is not known yet. Through site directed mutagenesis MT4-MMP has been inactivated in cancer cells through Glutamic acid 249 substitution by Alanine in the active site. Active MT4-MMP triggered an angiogenic switch at day 7 after tumor implantation and drastically accelerated subcutaneous tumor growth as well as lung colonization in RAG -/- mice. All these effects were abrogated upon MT4-MMP inactivation. In sharp contrast to most MMPs being primarily of stromal origin, we provide evidence that tumor-derived MT4-MMP, but not host-derived MT4-MMP contributes to angiogenesis. A genetic approach using MT4-MMP-deficient mice revealed that the status of MT4-MMP produced by host cells did not affect the angiogenic response. Despite of this tumor intrinsic feature, to exert its tumor promoting effect, MT4-MMP requires a permissive microenvironment. Indeed, tumor-derived MT4-MMP failed to circumvent the lack of an host angio-promoting factor such as lasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1). Overall, our study demonstrates the key contribution of MT4-MMP catalytic activity in the tumor compartment, at the interface with host cells. It identifies MT4-MMP as a key intrinsic tumor cell determinant that contributes to the elaboration of a permissive microenvironment for metastatic dissemination [less ▲]

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See detailNew and Paradoxical Roles of Matrix Metalloproteinases in the Tumor Microenvironment.
Noël, Agnès ULg; Gutierrez-Fernandez, A; Sounni, Nor Eddine ULg et al

in Frontiers in Pharmacology of Anti-Cancer Drugs (2012), 3(140), 1

Processes such as cell proliferation, angiogenesis, apoptosis, or invasion are strongly influenced by the surrounding microenvironment of the tumor. Therefore, the ability to change these surroundings ... [more ▼]

Processes such as cell proliferation, angiogenesis, apoptosis, or invasion are strongly influenced by the surrounding microenvironment of the tumor. Therefore, the ability to change these surroundings represents an important property through which tumor cells are able to acquire specific functions necessary for tumor growth and dissemination. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute key players in this process, allowing tumor cells to modify the extracellular matrix (ECM) and release cytokines, growth factors, and other cell-surface molecules, ultimately facilitating protease-dependent tumor progression. Remodeling of the ECM by collagenolytic enzymes such as MMP1, MMP8, MMP13, or the membrane-bound MT1-MMP as well as by other membrane-anchored proteases is required for invasion and recruitment of novel blood vessels. However, the multiple roles of the MMPs do not all fit into a simple pattern. Despite the pro-tumorigenic function of certain metalloproteinases, recent studies have shown that other members of these families, such as MMP8 or MMP11, have a protective role against tumor growth and metastasis in animal models. These studies have been further expanded by large-scale genomic analysis, revealing that the genes encoding metalloproteinases, such as MMP8, MMP27, ADAM7, and ADAM29, are recurrently mutated in specific tumors, while several ADAMTSs are epigenetically silenced in different cancers. The importance of these proteases in modifying the tumor microenvironment highlights the need for a deeper understanding of how stroma cells and the ECM can modulate tumor progression. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of CXCL8/IL-8 expression by Zonula Occludens-1 in human breast cancer cells.
Brysse, Anne ULg; Mestdagt, Mélanie ULg; Polette, Myriam et al

in Molecular Cancer Research (2012), 10(1), 121-32

Accumulating data now suggest that ZO-1, once delocalized from tight junctions, could be implicated in the regulation of tumor promoting genes. Because of their major implication in different steps of ... [more ▼]

Accumulating data now suggest that ZO-1, once delocalized from tight junctions, could be implicated in the regulation of tumor promoting genes. Because of their major implication in different steps of tumor progression, we investigated here the influence of ZO-1 on chemokines expression in breast cancer cells. Using GeneArray analysis to compare chemokine mRNA expression in breast tumor cells transfected with a siRNA against ZO-1, we identified CXCL-8/IL-8 as a major potential target of ZO-1 signaling, being strongly downregulated following ZO-1 siRNA transfection. Examining further the relationship between ZO-1 and IL-8, we first demonstrated that CXCL8/IL-8 expression correlates with a relocalization of ZO-1 in several breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, CXCL8/IL-8 is downregulated in invasive BT549 cells transfected with 3 different ZO-1 siRNA and overexpressed in non-invasive BT20 and SKBR3 cells transfected with vectors expressing ZO-1. We also provide evidence for an activation of the CXCL8/IL-8 promoter by ZO-1. Finally, we demonstrate that the regulation of CXCL8/IL-8 by ZO-1 is independent of the beta-catenin pathway. Our results thus clearly demonstrate an implication of ZO-1 in CXCL8/IL-8 regulation. Because of the major implications of CXCL8/IL-8 in tumor invasion, such a regulation could play an important role in breast cancer progression. [less ▲]

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See detailNUCLEAR DELIVERY OF A THERAPEUTIC PEPTIDE BY LONG CIRCULATING pH-SENSITIVE LIPOSOMES: BENEFITS OVER CLASSICAL VESICLES
Ducat, Emilie; Deprez, Juile; Noël, Agnès ULg et al

Poster (2011, December 06)

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See detailThe Antiangiogenic 16K Prolactin Impairs Functional Tumor Neovascularization by Inhibiting Vessel Maturation
Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Castermans, Karolien; Berndt, Sarah et al

in PLoS ONE (2011), 6(11), 27318-27318

Background: Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from existing vasculature, plays an essential role in tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. 16K hPRL, the antiangiogenic 16-kDa N-terminal ... [more ▼]

Background: Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from existing vasculature, plays an essential role in tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. 16K hPRL, the antiangiogenic 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin was shown to prevent tumor growth and metastasis by modifying tumor vessel morphology. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we investigated the effect of 16K hPRL on tumor vessel maturation and on the related signaling pathways. We show that 16K hPRL treatment leads, in a murine B16-F10 tumor model, to a dysfunctional tumor vasculature with reduced pericyte coverage, and disruption of the PDGF-B/PDGFR-B, Ang/Tie2, and Delta/Notch pathways. In an aortic ring assay, 16K hPRL impairs endothelial cell and pericyte outgrowth from the vascular ring. In addition, 16K hPRL prevents pericyte migration to endothelial cells. This event was independent of a direct inhibitory effect of 16K hPRL on pericyte viability, proliferation, or migration. In endothelial cell-pericyte cocultures, we found 16K hPRL to disturb Notch signaling. Conclusions/Significance: Taken together, our data show that 16K hPRL impairs functional tumor neovascularization by inhibiting vessel maturation and for the first time that an endogenous antiangiogenic agent disturbs Notch signaling. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of 16K hPRL action and highlight its potential for use in anticancer therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailInhibition of Experimental Corneal Neovascularization by Sunitinib Administration
Detry, Benoît ULg; BLACHER, Silvia ULg; Erpicum, Charlotte ULg et al

Poster (2011, October)

Cornea engraftment is the most common organ transplantation practiced around the world. The cornea is totally devoid of blood or lymphatic vessels, except in a peripheral zone called the limbus. This ... [more ▼]

Cornea engraftment is the most common organ transplantation practiced around the world. The cornea is totally devoid of blood or lymphatic vessels, except in a peripheral zone called the limbus. This property, named “corneal angiogenic privilege”, is conserved among all mammals to maintain cornea transparency and optimal visual acuity. In pathological conditions such as trauma, infections or hypoxia, blood and lymphatic vessels can grow into the avascular cornea, reducing visual acuity. In case of keratoplasty, it also considerably increases the risk of cornea graft rejection and is so considered as a high-risk keratoplasty. Treatments improving cornea survival after transplantation need to be developed, notably aiming at blocking corneal neovascularization. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of Sunitinib, a broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor, to reduce experimental corneal neovascularization. Cornea vascularization was induced by thermal cauterization applied in the center of C57Bl6 mice cornea, daily feeded with 40mg/kg Sunitinib or vehicule. Corneas were immunolabeled as whole mounts for CD31 and Lyve-1 to evidence blood and lymphatic vessels, 7, 11 and 17 days after cauterization. Whole mount pictures were analyzed by computer-assisted quantification, and relative vascular area, end-point density, node density, length density and maximal length of the vessels were determined to finely characterize blood and lymphatic vascular networks. We observed an inhibition of angiogenesis after 17 days in Sunitinib treated mice, where blood vessel relative surface, end-point density, branching density and length density were 1.8-fold decreased. Maximum length of blood vessels was also significantly reduced in the Sunitinib treated group at days 11 and 17. Lymphangiogenesis was strongly inhibited from day 6 to day 17 after cauterization where all parameters, except maximum length of lymphatic vessels, were significantly decreased. In case of transient Sunitinib administration (feeding during the 7 first days), we did not observe any reduction in the extent of blood or lymphatic networks developing 21 days after lesion induction. In vitro experimentations using the aortic and lymphatic ring assays showed a strong angiogenesis inhibition induced by Sunitinib while lymphangiogenesis was not inhibited. Our results show that the use of Sunitinib can strongly affect corneal neovascularisation and could enter in early treatment of such eye lesions to avoid vision loss and risk of cornea graft rejection. However, a punctual use of such tyrosine kinase inhibitor is not sufficient to stem neovascular reaction. In vitro experimentations show strong angiogenesis inhibition but normal lymphangiogenesis, suggesting indirect inhibitory effect of Sunitinib on corneal lymphangiogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailDigging deeper into lymphatic vessel formation in vitro and in vivo
Detry, Benoît ULg; Bruyère, F.; Erpicum, Charlotte ULg et al

in BMC Cell Biology (2011), 12

Background Abnormal lymphatic vessel formation (lymphangiogenesis) is associated with different pathologies such as cancer, lymphedema, psoriasis and graft rejection. Lymphatic vasculature displays ... [more ▼]

Background Abnormal lymphatic vessel formation (lymphangiogenesis) is associated with different pathologies such as cancer, lymphedema, psoriasis and graft rejection. Lymphatic vasculature displays distinctive features than blood vasculature, and mechanisms underlying the formation of new lymphatic vessels during physiological and pathological processes are still poorly documented. Most studies on lymphatic vessel formation are focused on organism development rather than lymphangiogenic events occurring in adults. We have here studied lymphatic vessel formation in two in vivo models of pathological lymphangiogenesis (corneal assay and lymphangioma). These data have been confronted to those generated in the recently set up in vitro model of lymphatic ring assay. Ultrastructural analyses through Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were performed to investigate tube morphogenesis, an important differentiating process observed during endothelial cell organization into capillary structures. [less ▲]

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