References of "Noël, Agnès"
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See detailADAMTS-1 metalloproteinase induces a stromal reaction and propotes tumor development in mice.
Rocks, Natacha ULg; Paulissen, Geneviève ULg; Quesada Calvo, Florence ULg et al

in Cancer Research (2008), 68(22), 9541-50

ADAMTS-1 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs), the first described member of the ADAMTS family, is differentially expressed in various tumors. However, its exact role in tumor ... [more ▼]

ADAMTS-1 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs), the first described member of the ADAMTS family, is differentially expressed in various tumors. However, its exact role in tumor development and progression is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ADAMTS-1 transfection in a bronchial epithelial tumor cell line (BZR) and its potential to modulate tumor development. ADAMTS-1 overexpression did not affect in vitro cell properties such as (a) proliferation in two-dimensional culture, (b) proliferation in three-dimensional culture, (c) anchorageindependent growth in soft agar, (d) cell migration and invasion in modified Boyden chamber assay, (e) angiogenesis in the aortic ring assay, and (f) cell apoptosis. In contrast, ADAMTS-1 stable transfection in BZR cells accelerated the in vivo tumor growth after s.c. injection into severe combined immunodeficient mice. It also promoted a stromal reaction characterized by myofibroblast infiltration and excessive matrix deposition. These features are, however, not observed in tumors derived from cells overexpressing a catalytically inactive mutant of ADAMTS-1. Conditioned media from ADAMTS-1–overexpressing cells display a potent chemotactic activity toward fibroblasts. ADAMTS-1 overexpression in tumors was associated with increased production of matrix metalloproteinase-13, fibronectin, transforming growth factor B (TGF-B), and interleukin-1B (IL-1B). Neutralizing antibodies against TGF-B and IL-1B blocked the chemotactic effect of medium conditioned by ADAMTS-1–expressing cells on fibroblasts, showing the contribution of these factors in ADAMTS-1–induced stromal reaction. In conclusion, we propose a new paradigm for catalytically active ADAMTS-1 contribution to tumor development, which consists of the recruitment of fibroblasts involved in tumor growth and tumor-associated stroma remodeling. [less ▲]

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See detailImplication of soluble receptors of VEGF, sVEGFR-1 and sVEGFR-2, in angiogenesis
Lorquet, Sophie ULg; Berndt, Sarah ULg; Blacher, Silvia ULg et al

in American Journal of Reproductive Immunology (2008), 60/1

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See detailImplication of VEGF receptor soluble forms, sVEGFR-1 and sVEGFR-2, in angiogenesis
Lorquet, Sophie ULg; Berndt, Sarah ULg; Blacher, Silvia ULg et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (2008), 63/1

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See detailNewly identified biologically active and proteolysis-resistant VEGF-A isoform VEGF111 is induced by genotoxic agents
Mineur, Pierre ULg; Colige, Alain ULg; Deroanne, Christophe ULg et al

in Journal of Cell Biology (2007), 179(6), 1261-1273

Ultraviolet B and genotoxic drugs induce the expression of a vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) splice variant (VEGF111) encoded by exons 1-4 and 8 in many cultured cells. Although not detected ... [more ▼]

Ultraviolet B and genotoxic drugs induce the expression of a vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) splice variant (VEGF111) encoded by exons 1-4 and 8 in many cultured cells. Although not detected in a series of normal human and mouse tissue, VEGF111 expression is induced in MCF-7 xenografts in nude mice upon treatment by camptothecin. The skipping of exons that contain proteolytic cleavage sites and extracellular matrix-binding domains makes VEGF111 diffusible and resistant to proteolysis. Recombinant VEGF111 activates VEGF receptor 2 (VEGF-R2) and extracellularly regulated kinase 1/2 in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells and porcine aortic endothelial cells expressing VEGF-R2. The mitogenic and chemotactic activity and VEGF111's ability to promote vascular network formation during embyonic stem cell differentiation are similar to those of VEGF121 and 165. Tumors in nude mice formed by HEK293 cells expressing VEGF111 develop a more widespread network of numerous small vessels in the peritumoral tissue than those expressing other isoforms. Its potent angiogenic activity and remarkable resistance to proteolysis makes VEGF111 a potential adverse factor during chemotherapy but a beneficial therapeutic tool for ischemic diseases. [less ▲]

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See detailInhibition of tumor growth and metastasis establishment by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer delivery of the antiangiogenic factor 16K hPRL
Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Cornet, Anne ULg; Blacher, Silvia ULg et al

in Molecular Therapy : The Journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy (2007), 15(12), 2094-2100

Tumor metastases, the most fearsome aspect of cancer, are generally resistant to conventional therapies. Angiogenesis is a crucial aspect of tumor growth and metastatic dissemination. Antiangiogenic ... [more ▼]

Tumor metastases, the most fearsome aspect of cancer, are generally resistant to conventional therapies. Angiogenesis is a crucial aspect of tumor growth and metastatic dissemination. Antiangiogenic therapy, therefore, holds potential as an attractive strategy for inhibiting metastasis development. Human 16K PRL (16K hPRL), a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis, has been demonstrated to prevent tumor growth in two xenograft mouse models, but whether it also affects tumor metastasis is unknown. In this study we will investigate the ability of 16K hPRL to prevent the establishment of metastasis. We demonstrate that 16K hPRL administered via adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, inhibits tumor growth by 86% in a subcutaneous (SC) B16-F10 mouse melanoma model. Computer-assisted image analysis shows that 16K hPRL treatment results in a reduction of tumor-vessel length and width, leading to a 57% reduction of average vessel size. In a pre-established tumor model, moreover, 16K hPRL can significantly delay tumor development. Finally, for the first time, we provide evidence that 16K hPRL considerably reduces the establishment of B16-F10 metastasis in an experimental lung metastasis model. Both the number and size of metastases are reduced by 50% in 16K hPRL-treated mice. These results highlight a potential role for 16K hPRL in anticancer therapy for both primary tumors and metastases. [less ▲]

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See detailAnti-angiogenic therapy of exudative age-related macular degeneration: current progress and emerging concepts
Noël, Agnès ULg; Jost, Maud; Lambert, Vincent ULg et al

in Trends in Molecular Medicine (2007), 13(8), 345-352

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in elderly patients. The more aggressive exudative form is characterized by abnormal blood-vessel development that occurs beneath ... [more ▼]

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in elderly patients. The more aggressive exudative form is characterized by abnormal blood-vessel development that occurs beneath the retina as a result of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF) has emerged as the key mediator of CNV formation; this has led to intensive research on VEGF and the recent approval of anti-VEGF compounds by the US Food and Drug Administration. Despite this successful introduction of anti-angiogenic therapies into the clinical setting, there is still a lack of treatments that definitively reverse damaged vision. Here, we consider the importance of putative molecular targets other than VEGF that might have been underestimated. Emerging cellular mechanisms offer additional opportunities for innovative therapeutic approaches. [less ▲]

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See detailThe lymphatic ring assay: a new in vitro model of lymphangiogenesis
Bruyère, F; Melen, L; Blacher, Silvia ULg et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailVascular architecture of breast cancer xenographs over-expressing MT4-MMP
Chabottaux, V; Thiry, Marc ULg; Alvarez Gonzalez, M-L et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailVascular architecture of breast cancer xenographs over-expressing MT4-MMP
Chabottaux, V; Thiry, Marc ULg; Blacher, Silvia ULg et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailVascular architecture of breast cancer xenographs over-expressing MT4-MMP
Chabottaux, V; Thiry, Marc ULg; Blacher, Silvia ULg et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailDefensis induce the recruitment of dendritic cells in cervical human papillomavirus-associated (pre)neoplastic lesions formed in vitro and transplanted in vivo
Hubert, Pascale ULg; Herman, Ludivine ULg; Maillard, Catherine ULg et al

in FASEB Journal (2007), 21(11), 2765-75

In addition to their direct antimicrobial activity, defensins might also influence adaptive immunity by attracting immature dendritic cells (DC). As these cells have been shown to be deficient in uterine ... [more ▼]

In addition to their direct antimicrobial activity, defensins might also influence adaptive immunity by attracting immature dendritic cells (DC). As these cells have been shown to be deficient in uterine cervix carcinogenesis, we evaluated the ability of -defensin (HNP-2, human neutrophil defensin 2) and ß-defensin (HßD2, human beta defensin 2) to stimulate their migration in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated (pre)cancers. We first observed, using RT-PCR and immunohistology, that HßD2 is absent in HPV-transformed keratinocytes and that it is weakly expressed in cervical (pre)neoplastic lesions in comparison with normal keratinocytes. We next demonstrated that defensins exert a chemotactic activity for DC in a Boyden Chamber assay and stimulate their infiltration in an in vitro-formed (pre)neoplastic epithelium (organotypic culture of HPV-transformed keratinocytes). To evaluate the ability of defensins also to recruit DC in vivo, we developed a model of immunodeficient mice grafted with organotypic cultures of HPV+ keratinocytes, which form an epithelium similar to a high-grade neoplastic lesion, with tumoral invasion and neovascularization. Intravenously injected human DC were able to infiltrate grafts of HPV+ keratinocytes after administration of HNP-2 in the transplantation chamber. Taken together, these results suggest that defensins could reverse a frequent immune alteration observed in cancer development. [less ▲]

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See detailBreast cancer progression: insights into multifaceted matrix metalloproteinases
Chabottaux, Vincent; Noël, Agnès ULg

in Clinical & Experimental Metastasis (2007), 24(8), 647-656

The restricted view of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as simple destroyers of extracellular matrix components has largely ignored their substantial contribution in many aspects of cancer development and ... [more ▼]

The restricted view of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as simple destroyers of extracellular matrix components has largely ignored their substantial contribution in many aspects of cancer development and metastatic dissemination. Over the last few years, the relevance of MMPs in the processing of a large array of extracellular and cell surface-associated proteins has grown considerably. Our knowledge about the complex functions of MMPs and how their contribution may differ throughout cancer progression is rapidly expanding. These new findings provide several explanations for the lack of success of MMP inhibition in clinical trials. A complete understanding of MMP biology is needed before considering them, their substrates or their products as therapeutic targets. In this review, we explore the different faces of MMP implication in breast cancer progression by considering both clinical and fundamental aspects. [less ▲]

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See detailTumoral and choroidal vascularization: differential cellular mechanisms involving plasminogen activator inhibitor type I.
Jost, Maud; Maillard, Catherine ULg; Lecomte, Julie ULg et al

in American Journal of Pathology (2007), 171(4), 1369-80

An adequate balance between serine proteases and their plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is critical for pathological angiogenesis. PAI-1 deficiency in mice is associated with impaired choroidal ... [more ▼]

An adequate balance between serine proteases and their plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is critical for pathological angiogenesis. PAI-1 deficiency in mice is associated with impaired choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and tumoral angiogenesis. In the present work, we demonstrate unexpected differences in the contribution of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells in these two processes regulated by PAI-1. PAI-1(-/-) mice grafted with BM-derived from wild-type mice were able to support laser-induced CNV formation but not skin carcinoma vascularization. Engraftment of irradiated wild-type mice with PAI-1(-/-) BM prevented CNV formation, demonstrating the crucial role of PAI-1 delivered by BM-derived cells. In contrast, the transient infiltration of tumor transplants by local PAI-1-producing host cells rather than by BM cells was sufficient to rescue tumor growth and angiogenesis in PAI-1-deficient mice. These data identify PAI-1 as a molecular determinant of a local permissive soil for tumor angiogenesis. Altogether, the present study demonstrates that different cellular mechanisms contribute to PAI-1-regulated tumoral and CNV. PAI-1 contributes to BM-dependent choroidal vascularization and to BM-independent tumor growth and angiogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreased Inflammation Delays Wound Healing in Mice Deficient in Collagenase-2 (MMP-8)
Gutierrez-Fernandez, A.; Inada, M.; Balbin, M. et al

in FASEB Journal (2007), 21(10), 2580-91

Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in numerous tissue-remodeling processes. The finding that mice deficient in collagenase-2 (MMP-8) are more susceptible to develop skin cancer ... [more ▼]

Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in numerous tissue-remodeling processes. The finding that mice deficient in collagenase-2 (MMP-8) are more susceptible to develop skin cancer, prompted us to investigate the role of this protease in cutaneous wound healing. We have observed a significant delay in wound closure in MMP8-/- mice and an altered inflammatory response in their wounds, with a delay of neutrophil infiltration during the first days and a persistent inflammation at later time points. These changes were accompanied by alterations in the TGF-beta1 signaling pathway and by an apoptosis defect in MMP8-/- mice. The delay in wound healing observed in MMP8-/- mice was rescued by bone marrow transplantation from wild-type mice. Analysis of other MMPs showed that MMP8-/- mice had a significant increase in the expression of MMP-9, suggesting that both proteases might act coordinately in this process. This possibility was further supported by the novel finding that MMP-8 and MMP-9 form specific complexes in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that MMP-8 participates in wound repair by contributing to the resolution of inflammation and open the possibility to develop new strategies for treating wound healing defects. [less ▲]

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