References of "Noël, Agnès"
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See detailImproved computer-assisted analysis of the global lymphatic network in human cervical tissues.
Balsat, Cédric ULg; Signolle, Nicolas; GOFFIN, Frédéric ULg et al

in Modern Pathology : An Official Journal of the United States & Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc (2014), 27(6), 887-98

Lymphatic dissemination is a key event in cervical cancer progression and related tumor lymphatic markers are viewed as promising prognostic factor of nodal extension. However, validating such parameters ... [more ▼]

Lymphatic dissemination is a key event in cervical cancer progression and related tumor lymphatic markers are viewed as promising prognostic factor of nodal extension. However, validating such parameters requires an objective characterization of the lymphatic vasculature. Here, we performed a global analysis of the lymphatic network using a new computerized method applied on whole uterine cervical digital images. Sixty-eight cases of cervical neoplasia (12 CIN3, 10 FIGO stage 1A and 46 stage IB1) and 10 cases of normal cervical tissue were reacted with antibodies raised against D2-40, D2-40/p16 and D2-40/Ki67. Immunostained structures were automatically detected on whole slides. The lymphatic vessel density (D2-40), proliferating lymphatic vessel density (D2-40/ki67) and spatial lymphatic distribution in respect to the adjacent epithelium were assessed from normal cervix to early cervical cancer and correlated with lymphovascular space invasion and lymph node status. Prominent lymphatic vessel density and proliferating lymphatic vessel density are detected under the transformation zone of benign cervix and no further increase is noted during cancer progression. Notably, a shift of lymphatic vessel distribution toward the neoplastic edges is detected. In IB1 cervical cancer, although intra- and peritumoral lymphatic vessel density are neither correlated with lymphovascular space invasion nor with lymph node metastasis, a specific spatial distribution with more lymphatic vessels in the vicinity of tumor edges is predictive of lymphatic dissemination. Herein, we provide a new computerized method suitable for an innovative detailed analysis of the lymphatic network. We show that the transformation zone of the benign cervix acts as a baseline lymphangiogenic niche before the initiation of neoplastic process. During cancer progression, this specific microenvironment is maintained with lymphatic vessels even in closer vicinity to tumor cells.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 6 December 2013; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2013.195. [less ▲]

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See detailBlocking lipid synthesis overcomes tumor re-growth and metastasis after anti-angiogenic therapy withdrawal.
Sounni, Nor Eddine ULg; Cimino, Jonathan ULg; Blacher, Silvia ULg et al

in Cell Metabolism (2014), 20(2), 280-94

The molecular mechanisms responsible for the failure of antiangiogenic therapies and how tumors adapt to these therapies are unclear. Here, we applied transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic approaches ... [more ▼]

The molecular mechanisms responsible for the failure of antiangiogenic therapies and how tumors adapt to these therapies are unclear. Here, we applied transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic approaches to preclinical models and provide evidence for tumor adaptation to vascular endothelial growth factor blockade through a metabolic shift toward carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in tumors. During sunitinib or sorafenib treatment, tumor growth was inhibited and tumors were hypoxic and glycolytic. In sharp contrast, treatment withdrawal led to tumor regrowth, angiogenesis restoration, moderate lactate production, and enhanced lipid synthesis. This metabolic shift was associated with a drastic increase in metastatic dissemination. Interestingly, pharmacological lipogenesis inhibition with orlistat or fatty acid synthase downregulation with shRNA inhibited tumor regrowth and metastases after sunitinib treatment withdrawal. Our data shed light on metabolic alterations that result in cancer adaptation to antiangiogenic treatments and identify key molecules involved in lipid metabolism as putative therapeutic targets. [less ▲]

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See detailEstetrol and neuroprotection against perinatal ischemic insult
Tskitishvili, Ekaterine ULg; Nisolle, Michelle ULg; Noël, Agnès ULg et al

in Estetrol attenuates neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (2014)

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See detailPAI-1 mediates the antiangiogenic and profibrinolytic effects of 16K prolactin.
Bajou, Khalid ULg; Herkenne, Stéphanie ULg; Thijssen, Victor L. et al

in Nature Medicine (2014), sous presse

The N-terminal fragment of prolactin (16K PRL) inhibits tumor growth by impairing angiogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we found that 16K PRL binds the fibrinolytic inhibitor ... [more ▼]

The N-terminal fragment of prolactin (16K PRL) inhibits tumor growth by impairing angiogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we found that 16K PRL binds the fibrinolytic inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), which is known to contextually promote tumor angiogenesis and growth. Loss of PAI-1 abrogated the antitumoral and antiangiogenic effects of 16K PRL. PAI-1 bound the ternary complex PAI-1-urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)-uPA receptor (uPAR), thereby exerting antiangiogenic effects. By inhibiting the antifibrinolytic activity of PAI-1, 16K PRL also protected mice against thromboembolism and promoted arterial clot lysis. Thus, by signaling through the PAI-1-uPA-uPAR complex, 16K PRL impairs tumor vascularization and growth and, by inhibiting the antifibrinolytic activity of PAI-1, promotes thrombolysis. [less ▲]

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See detailCell invasion in the spheroid sprouting assay: a spatial organisation analysis adaptable to cell behaviour.
Blacher, Silvia ULg; Erpicum, Charlotte ULg; Lenoir, Benedicte et al

in PLoS ONE (2014), 9(5), 97019

The endothelial cell spheroid assay provides a suitable in vitro model to study (lymph) angiogenesis and test pro- and anti-(lymph) angiogenic factors or drugs. Usually, the extent of cell invasion ... [more ▼]

The endothelial cell spheroid assay provides a suitable in vitro model to study (lymph) angiogenesis and test pro- and anti-(lymph) angiogenic factors or drugs. Usually, the extent of cell invasion, observed through optical microscopy, is measured. The present study proposes the spatial distribution of migrated cells as a new descriptor of the (lymph) angiogenic response. The utility of this novel method rests with its capacity to locally characterise spheroid structure, allowing not only the investigation of single and collective cell invasion but also the evolution of the spheroid core itself. Moreover, the proposed method can be applied to 2D-projected spheroid images obtained by optical microscopy, as well as to 3D images acquired by confocal microscopy. To validate the proposed methodology, endothelial cell invasion was evaluated under different experimental conditions. The results were compared with widely used global parameters. The comparison shows that our method prevents local spheroid modifications from being overlooked and leading to the possible misinterpretation of results. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of adenosine on lymphangiogenesis.
Lenoir, Bénédicte ULg; Wagner, Daniel R.; Blacher, Silvia ULg et al

in PloS one (2014), 9(3), 92715

BACKGROUND: The lymphatic system controls tissue homeostasis by draining protein-rich lymph to the vascular system. Lymphangiogenesis, the formation of lymphatic vessels, is a normal event in childhood ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The lymphatic system controls tissue homeostasis by draining protein-rich lymph to the vascular system. Lymphangiogenesis, the formation of lymphatic vessels, is a normal event in childhood but promotes tumor spread and metastasis during adulthood. Blocking lymphangiogenesis may therefore be of therapeutic interest. Production of adenosine is enhanced in the tumor environment and contributes to tumor progression through stimulation of angiogenesis. In this study, we determined whether adenosine affects lymphangiogenesis. METHODS: Lymphatic endothelial cells (HMVEC-dLy) were cultured in presence of adenosine and their proliferation, migration and tube formation was assessed. Gelatin sponges embedded with the stable analogue of adenosine 2-chloro adenosine were implanted in mice ear and lymphangiogenesis was quantified. Mice were intravenously injected with adenoviruses containing expression vector for 5'-endonucleotidase, which plays a major role in the formation of adenosine. RESULTS: In vitro, we observed that adenosine decreased the proliferation of lymphatic endothelial cells, their migration and tube formation. However, in vivo, gelatin sponges containing 2-chloro adenosine and implanted in mice ear displayed an elevated level of lymphangiogenesis (2.5-fold, p<0.001). Adenovirus-mediated over-expression of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase IA stimulated lymphangiogenesis and the recruitment of macrophages in mouse liver. Proliferation of lymphatic endothelial cells was enhanced (2-fold, p<0.001) when incubated in the presence of conditioned medium from murine macrophages. CONCLUSION: We have shown that adenosine stimulates lymphangiogenesis in vivo, presumably through a macrophage-mediated mechanism. This observation suggests that blockade of adenosine receptors may help in anti-cancer therapies. [less ▲]

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See detailGene expression pattern of synovial cells from inflammatory and normal areas of osteoarthritis synovial membrane.
Lambert, Cécile ULg; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Montell, Eulalia et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2014), sous presse

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the gene expression pattern of synovial cells from inflammatory (I) or normal/reactive (N/R) areas of a synovial membrane harvested from the same ... [more ▼]

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the gene expression pattern of synovial cells from inflammatory (I) or normal/reactive (N/R) areas of a synovial membrane harvested from the same osteoarthritis (OA) patient. Methods: Synovial tissues were obtained from 12 knee OA patients at the time of total knee replacement. The inflammatory status of the synovial membrane was characterized according to macroscopic criteria and sorted as N/R and I. Biopsies were cultured separately for 7 days. Microarray gene expression profiling between N/R and I areas was performed. Western blot and immunohistochemistry confirmed the identified genes that were differentially expressed. Results: 896 differentially expressed genes between N/R and I zones were identified. The key pathways were related to inflammation, cartilage metabolism, Wnt signaling and angiogenesis. In the inflammatory network, TREM1 and S100A9 were strongly up-regulated. MMP-3 and -9, cathepsin H and S were significantly up-regulated in the cartilage catabolism pathway, whereas the most up-regulated anabolism enzyme was HAS1. Wnt-5A and LRP5 were up-regulated whereas FZD2 and DKK3 were down-regulated in the Wnt signaling. Finally, STC1, a protein involved in angiogenesis was identified as the most up-regulated gene in I zones compared to N/R zones. Conclusion: This study is the first to identify different expression pattern between two areas of the synovial membrane in the same patient. These differences concern several key pathways involved in OA pathogenesis. This analysis also provides information regarding new genes and proteins as potential targets for the future therapeutic. (c) 2013 American College of Rheumatology. [less ▲]

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See detailMMP-Mediated Collagen Remodeling and Vessel Functions
Noël, Agnès ULg; Sounni, Nor Eddine ULg

in BRIX, K.; STOCKER, W. (Eds.) Proteases: Structure and Function, (2014)

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See detailStudy of the pro-tumoral effects of MT4-MMP
Yip, Cassandre ULg; PAYE, Alexandra ULg; Truong, Alice ULg et al

Scientific conference (2013, December 05)

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See detailMolecular mechanisms of type I collagen-induced apoptosis in breast carcinoma cells
Maquoi, Erik ULg; Assent, Delphine ULg; Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg et al

Poster (2013, September 27)

Objective: As invading breast carcinoma cells breach the underlying basement membrane, they become confronted with a dense three-dimensional reactive stroma dominated by type I collagen. To develop ... [more ▼]

Objective: As invading breast carcinoma cells breach the underlying basement membrane, they become confronted with a dense three-dimensional reactive stroma dominated by type I collagen. To develop metastatic capabilities, invading tumour cells must acquire the capacity to negotiate this hostile microenvironment. By enmeshing cells in a dense fibrillar network, type I collagen acts as a physical barrier for cell migration as well as an endogenous antigrowth signal, partly by inducing apoptosis in epithelial cells. Aberrant cell survival resulting from an acquired resistance toward apoptosis represents a prominent hallmark of cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms implicated in collagen-induced apoptosis remain poorly defined. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanisms by which type I collagen induces apoptosis in breast carcinoma cells and identify MMP-14, a membrane-anchored matrix metalloproteinase, as a key anti-apoptotic factor. Methods: To investigate the induction of apoptosis by collagen, human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells overexpressing or not MMP-14 were plated on plastic plates or embedded within three dimensional type I collagen gels (Col3D). Cell death was evaluated by measuring cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragments (Cell Death Detection ELISA). The percentage of cells with an apoptotic nuclear morphology was also determined. The interactions between cancer cells and Col3D were analyzed by confocal microscopy and the impact of Col3D on the transcriptome of cancer cells was investigated using Illumina HT-12 BeadArrays. Results: When cultured within Col3D gels, MCF-7 cells displayed a round morphology and a cell death characterized by a Z-VAD-FMK-dependent chromatin condensation, nuclear segmentation and oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation was induced. Transfection of MCF-7 cells with MMP-14 cDNA promoted the interactions between cells and collagen and prevented apoptosis. A transcriptomic analysis revealed that culturing MCF-7 cells within Col3D altered the expression of about 700 genes, irrespective of MMP-14 expression. Col3D modulated the expression of several apoptosis-related genes. Interestingly, MMP-14 activity was sufficient to prevent the Col3D-dependent induction of Bcl2-Interacting Killer (BIK), a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family. Conclusions: Our results shed light on the molecular mechanisms by which a collagen-rich microenvironment triggers apoptosis in invading breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MMP-14 promotes tumour progression by circumventing apoptosis. [less ▲]

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See detailStudy of the pro-tumoral effects of MT4-MMP
Yip, Cassandre ULg; PAYE, Alexandra ULg; Truong, Alice ULg et al

Scientific conference (2013, September 13)

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See detailRegulation of breast cancer cell properties by MT4-MMP
Yip, Cassandre ULg; PAYE, Alexandra ULg; Truong, Alice ULg et al

Scientific conference (2013, July 02)

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See detailAge-related Macular Degeneration Study: A Metabolomics Approach
LAMBERT, Vincent ULg; Hansen, Sylvain ULg; Rousseau, Réjanne et al

Conference (2013, May 23)

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss in the western world among people aged 50 or older. 90% of all vision loss due to AMD result from the exudative form, which is ... [more ▼]

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss in the western world among people aged 50 or older. 90% of all vision loss due to AMD result from the exudative form, which is characterized by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Age-related changes that induce pathologic CNV are incompletely understood. A successful application of anti-VEGF approaches in the clinic is obviously a turning point in AMD treatment. Nevertheless, despite such important advances, critical issues remain to be addressed. To better understand the etiology of this pathology, we have used and improved a model of laser-induced murine choroidal neovascularization. As none is known about the metabolic changes in patients with AMD, we decided to apply a 1H NMR metabolomics approach on AMD patients and on a mice CNV experimental model. This technique is a relatively new branch of « omics » technologies focused on the analysis and measurement of endogenous metabolites. These experiments provide unique challenges to fulfill the goal of improving the current status of physiological information related to metabolome and in general to functional genomics. For this purpose, sera from control and AMD patients, induced and non-induced mice have been collected and the metabolic profiles of these samples were determined by 1H NMR. After post-processing treatments, the different spectra were analyzed by statistical discriminant methodologies (PCA, ICA, PLS-DA). This approach allows the differentiation between control and AMD patients and between laser-induced mice and the control mice group. Moreover, the same discriminating spectral zones, lactate and lipoproteins profil, have been identified in human and mice model, leading to the emergence of different putative biomarkers. In mice model of laser-induced CNV, normalization of circulating lactate by dichloroacetate, decreases CNV development. These first interesting results open new way in the study of the AMD etiology and validate the use of 1H NMR and CNV model for the understanding of Age-related Macular Degeneration. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of breast cancer cell properties by MT4-MMP
Yip, Cassandre ULg; PAYE, Alexandra ULg; Truong, Alice ULg et al

Scientific conference (2013, May 17)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (7 ULg)