References of "Nguyen, Laurent"
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See detailHuntington’s Disease: From the Physiological Function of Huntingtin to the Disease
Borgs, Laurence ULg; Godin, Juliette ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg et al

in Huntington's Disease - Core Concepts and Current Advances (2012)

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See detailCortical interneurons tangential migration : p27(Kip1) as a novel master regulator.
Godin, Juliette ULg; Thomas, Noémie; Laguesse, Sophie ULg et al

Poster (2012)

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See detailp27(Kip1) as a master regulator of cortical neuron migration.
Godin, Juliette ULg; Thomas, Noémie; Laguesse, Sophie ULg et al

Poster (2012)

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See detailp27(Kip1) as a master regulator of cortical neuron migration.
Godin, Juliette ULg; Thomas, Noémie; Laguesse, Sophie ULg et al

Poster (2012)

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See detailCycling or not cycling: cell cycle regulatory molecules and adult neurogenesis.
Beukelaers, Pierre ULg; Vandenbosch, Renaud ULg; Caron, Nicolas ULg et al

in Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS (2012), 69(9), 1493-1503

The adult brain most probably reaches its highest degree of plasticity with the lifelong generation and integration of new neurons in the hippocampus and olfactory system. Neural precursor cells (NPCs ... [more ▼]

The adult brain most probably reaches its highest degree of plasticity with the lifelong generation and integration of new neurons in the hippocampus and olfactory system. Neural precursor cells (NPCs) residing both in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles continuously generate neurons that populate the dentate gyrus and the olfactory bulb, respectively. The regulation of NPC proliferation in the adult brain has been widely investigated in the past few years. Yet, the intrinsic cell cycle machinery underlying NPC proliferation remains largely unexplored. In this review, we discuss the cell cycle components that are involved in the regulation of NPC proliferation in both neurogenic areas of the adult brain. [less ▲]

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See detailMicroRNAs tune cerebral cortical neurogenesis.
Volvert, M.-L.; Rogister, F.; Moonen, Gustave ULg et al

in Cell Death & Differentiation (2012), 19(10), 1573-81

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that promote post-transcriptional silencing of genes involved in a wide range of developmental and pathological processes. It is estimated that most protein-coding ... [more ▼]

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that promote post-transcriptional silencing of genes involved in a wide range of developmental and pathological processes. It is estimated that most protein-coding genes harbor miRNA recognition sequences in their 3' untranslated region and are thus putative targets. While functions of miRNAs have been extensively characterized in various tissues, their multiple contributions to cerebral cortical development are just beginning to be unveiled. This review aims to outline the evidence collected to date demonstrating a role for miRNAs in cerebral corticogenesis with a particular emphasis on pathways that control the birth and maturation of functional excitatory projection neurons. [less ▲]

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See detailp27(Kip1) Is a Microtubule-Associated Protein that Promotes Microtubule Polymerization during Neuron Migration.
Godin, Juliette ULg; Thomas, Noemie; Laguesse, Sophie ULg et al

in Developmental Cell (2012), 23(4), 729-44

The migration of cortical interneurons is characterized by extensive morphological changes that result from successive cycles of nucleokinesis and neurite branching. Their molecular bases remain elusive ... [more ▼]

The migration of cortical interneurons is characterized by extensive morphological changes that result from successive cycles of nucleokinesis and neurite branching. Their molecular bases remain elusive, and the present work describes how p27(Kip1) controls cell-cycle-unrelated signaling pathways to regulate these morphological remodelings. Live imaging reveals that interneurons lacking p27(Kip1) show delayed tangential migration resulting from defects in both nucleokinesis and dynamic branching of the leading process. At the molecular level, p27(Kip1) is a microtubule-associated protein that promotes polymerization of microtubules in extending neurites, thereby contributing to tangential migration. Furthermore, we show that p27(Kip1) controls actomyosin contractions that drive both forward translocation of the nucleus and growth cone splitting. Thus, p27(Kip1) cell-autonomously controls nucleokinesis and neurite branching by regulating both actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. [less ▲]

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See detailGlycine receptor activation controls interneuron migration by affecting nuclear translocation and myosin phosphorylation
Avila Macaya, Ariel Salvatore ULg; Nguyen, Laurent ULg

Poster (2012)

Previous studies have described the presence of glycine receptor mRNA during early stages of embryonic cortex development. Here, we have tested the functionality of those receptors in migratory ... [more ▼]

Previous studies have described the presence of glycine receptor mRNA during early stages of embryonic cortex development. Here, we have tested the functionality of those receptors in migratory interneurons and demonstrated their involvement in the control of cell migration. We suggest a mechanism whereby activation of glycine receptors during tangential migration activates voltage gated calcium channels and favors influx of calcium that ultimately affect myosin II activity, a mechanism that fine tune nuclear translocation and thus migration speed. [less ▲]

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See detailGlycine receptor activation influences early cortical development
Avila Macaya, Ariel Salvatore ULg; Nguyen, Laurent ULg

Poster (2011, July 14)

The strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR) is a member of the ligand-gated ion channel superfamily. In the adult, the GlyR is known to mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the spinal cord ... [more ▼]

The strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR) is a member of the ligand-gated ion channel superfamily. In the adult, the GlyR is known to mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the spinal cord and in the brainstem. The GlyR has also been described in the embryonic cortex after embryonic day 19 (E19) (Flint et al., 1998) where it could participate in developmental processes, but its presence at earlier stages has not been documented. Since other neurotransmitter systems, i.e. GABA and its receptors, are known to be potent signals that control corticogenesis (Nguyen et al., 2001; Ik-Tsen et al., 2007), we wondered if glycine and its GlyR could also fulfill such a function. In this study, we analyze GlyR expression and its physiological function in the early development of the cortex using in vitro cultures of embryonic day 13 slices, patch-clamp and immunocytochemistry. [less ▲]

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See detailp27(Kip1) as a master regulator of cortical neuron migration
Godin, Juliette ULg; Thomas, Noémie; Laguesse, Sophie ULg et al

Scientific conference (2011, June)

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See detailPhosphorylation of SCG10/stathmin-2 determines multipolar stage exit and neuronal migration rate
Westerlund, N.; Zdrojewska, J.; Padzik, A. et al

in Nature Neuroscience (2011)

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See detailCdk6-dependent regulation of g(1) length controls adult neurogenesis.
Beukelaers, Pierre; Vandenbosch, Renaud ULg; Caron, Nicolas ULg et al

in Stem Cells (2011), 29(4), 713-24

The presence of neurogenic precursors in the adult mammalian brain is now widely accepted, but the mechanisms coupling their proliferation with the onset of neuronal differentiation remain unknown. Here ... [more ▼]

The presence of neurogenic precursors in the adult mammalian brain is now widely accepted, but the mechanisms coupling their proliferation with the onset of neuronal differentiation remain unknown. Here, we unravel the major contribution of the G(1) regulator cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (Cdk6) to adult neurogenesis. We found that Cdk6 was essential for cell proliferation within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. Specifically, Cdk6 deficiency prevents the expansion of neuronally committed precursors by lengthening G(1) phase duration, reducing concomitantly the production of newborn neurons. Altogether, our data support G(1) length as an essential regulator of the switch between proliferation and neuronal differentiation in the adult brain and Cdk6 as one intrinsic key molecular regulator of this process. STEM Cells 2011;29:713-724. [less ▲]

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See detailThe glycine receptor is functionally expressed in migratory interneurons and influences early cortical development
Avila Macaya, Ariel Salvatore ULg; Nguyen, Laurent ULg

Poster (2011)

The strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR) is a member of the ligand-gated ion channel superfamily. In the adult, the GlyR is known to mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the spinal cord ... [more ▼]

The strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR) is a member of the ligand-gated ion channel superfamily. In the adult, the GlyR is known to mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the spinal cord and in the brainstem. The GlyR has also been described in the embryonic cortex after embryonic day 19 (E19) (Flint et al., 1998) where it could participate in developmental processes, but its presence at earlier stages has not been documented. Since other neurotransmitter systems, i.e. GABA and its receptors, are known to be potent signals that control corticogenesis (Nguyen et al., 2001; Ik-Tsen et al., 2007), we wondered if glycine and its GlyR could also fulfill such a function. In this study, we analyze GlyR expression and its physiological function in the early development of the cortex using in vitro cultures of embryonic day 13 slices, patch-clamp, two photon microscopy and immunocytochemistry. [less ▲]

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See detailUsing human pluripotent stem cells to untangle neurodegenerative disease mechanisms
Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Borgs, Laurence ULg; Grobarczyk, Benjamin ULg et al

in Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS (2011), 68(4), 635-49

Human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic (hES) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS), retain the ability to self-renew indefinitely, while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into all ... [more ▼]

Human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic (hES) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS), retain the ability to self-renew indefinitely, while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into all cell types of the nervous system. While human pluripotent cell-based therapies are unlikely to arise soon, these cells can currently be used as an inexhaustible source of committed neurons to perform high-throughput screening and safety testing of new candidate drugs. Here, we describe critically the available methods and molecular factors that are used to direct the differentiation of hES or hiPS into specific neurons. In addition, we discuss how the availability of patient-specific hiPS offers a unique opportunity to model inheritable neurodegenerative diseases and untangle their pathological mechanisms, or to validate drugs that would prevent the onset or the progression of these neurological disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailHuntingtin is Required for Mitotic Spindle Orientation and Mammalian Neurogenesis
Godin, Juliette ULg; Colombo, kelly; Molina-Calavita, Maria et al

in Neuron (2010), 67(3)

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (6 ULg)