References of "Nguyen, Frédéric"
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See detailComparison of temperature from DTS and ERT with direct measurements during heat tracer experiments in heterogeneous aquifers
Nguyen, Frédéric ULg; Hermans, Thomas ULg; Jamin, Pierre ULg et al

Conference (2016, September 27)

Geothermal field characterization and heat tracer experiments often rely on scarce temperature data collected in boreholes. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and distributed temperature sensing (DTS ... [more ▼]

Geothermal field characterization and heat tracer experiments often rely on scarce temperature data collected in boreholes. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and distributed temperature sensing (DTS) have the potential to provide spatial information on temperature changes in the subsurface. In this contribution, we show how DTS and ERT have been used to investigate the heterogeneity of a heterogeneous aquifer during a heat tracing experiment under forced gradient conditions. Optic fibers were installed in the heat injection well and in two piezometers intersecting the main flow directions at 8 m from the injection well. These piezometers were also equipped with ERT. The DTS measurement in the injection well clearly shows the two-layer nature of the aquifer. After the end of injection, the temperature in the bottom part of the well decreases faster than in the upper part due to the higher water fluxes. Those results are confirmed by DTS measurements in natural flow conditions during a heating wire test. DTS and ERT in the cross-panel both show the vertical and lateral heterogeneity of the aquifer. Temperatures only increase significantly in the bottom part of the aquifer where advection is predominant. However, strong differences are observed laterally. ERT additionally shows that the hot plume is divided in two main flow paths, which is confirmed by direct temperature measurements. The comparison of DTS and ERT shows that one of the well is suffering from water mixing. Indeed, temperature from DTS are homogeneous over the whole tichkness of the aquifer, whereas ERT temperature, less affected by local variations, are varying. Our study demonstrate the value of spatially distributed measurements for the monitoring of heat tracer experiment and highligths the issue of multilevel sampling. The detailed temperature measurements can be subsequently used in hydrogeological model to better estimates heat flow and transport parameters. [less ▲]

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See detailQuantitative characterization and calibration of salt water intrusion models with electrical resistivity tomography
Beaujean, Jean; Hermans, Thomas ULg; Vandenbohede, Alexander et al

Poster (2016, July 26)

Groundwater quality and coastal ecosystems in coastal areas are among the most vulnerable as they are threatened by excessive groundwater withdrawals, sea level rise and storm events potentially leading ... [more ▼]

Groundwater quality and coastal ecosystems in coastal areas are among the most vulnerable as they are threatened by excessive groundwater withdrawals, sea level rise and storm events potentially leading to salt water intrusions or infiltration into fresh water aquifers. The environmental protection and sustainable management of these groundwater resources often involves the development and calibration of a groundwater model subsequently used to forecast the total dissolved solid content (TDS). However, groundwater models are often built based on a limited number of sparse data due to borehole availability. Geophysical methods can provide spatially and temporally distributed data for hydrogeological modeling at relatively limited costs. In particular, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is very sensitive to the conductivity of pore water which is directly linked to the TDS content. The method is therefore well-suited for the monitoring of salt water intrusions. However, the inversion of ERT data involves a regularization process so that the resulting tomogram is only an estimate of the true resistivity distribution, suffering from smoothing and varying resolution. In many cases, the interpretation of ERT remains qualitative and skewed. In this contribution, we propose two different methods to improve the information content that can be extracted from ERT data. First, we show with a field example from Belgium how alternative regularization methods can be developed to integrate independent information into the inversion process of ERT. This enabled us to obtain a resistivity distribution much closer to the one observed in validation boreholes. Then, a site-specific petrophysical relationship is used to derive the TDS content of the aquifer from ERT tomograms. This can be directly used as input in the calibration process of a hydrogeological model. We also show how it is possible to counterbalance the effect of resolution loss with depth for surface ERT by filtering the results relative to their sensitivity. We show that this filtering is mandatory to use the ERT-derived information for calibrating a hydrogeological model. In a second example, we show how a fully coupled inversion approach can be used to directly invert geophysical data together with hydrogeological data for the calibration of hydrogeological models. At each iteration of the calibration, the simulated TDS content is transformed in a resistivity distribution using a parameterized petrophysical relationship and forward geophysical modeling yields the geophysical response. We show that this approach enables to better estimate the hydrogeological parameters of the simulated coastal aquifer than with an uncoupled approach if the conceptual model is sufficiently representative. With those two examples, we demonstrate the usefulness of ERT in the monitoring of salt water intrusions, both qualitatively to identify most vulnerable zones and quantitatively to estimate ERT-derived TDS contents or geophysical data and calibrate hydrogeological models. An innovative approach may consist in a conjunctive use of filtered geophysically-derived and geophysical data within the coupled hydrogeophysical inversion framework. Such an uncoupled-coupled approach based on a resolution threshold approach may offer a promising developing trend in hydrogeophysical inversion. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the α-polarization of bacterial suspensions: SIP measurements on four bacterial strains
Pilawski, Tamara ULg; Tappe, Wolfgang; Zimmermann, Egon et al

Poster (2016, June 06)

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See detailHeat tracer test in an alluvial aquifer: field experiment and inverse modelling
Klepikova, Maria; Wildemeersch, Samuel; Hermans, Thomas ULg et al

in Journal of Hydrology (2016), 540

Using heat as an active tracer for aquifer characterization is a topic of increasing interest. In this study, we investigate the potential of using heat tracer tests for characterization of a shallow ... [more ▼]

Using heat as an active tracer for aquifer characterization is a topic of increasing interest. In this study, we investigate the potential of using heat tracer tests for characterization of a shallow alluvial aquifer. A thermal tracer test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer of the Meuse River, Belgium. The tracing experiment consisted in simultaneously injecting heated water and a dye tracer in an injection well and monitoring the evolution of groundwater temperature and tracer concentration in the pumping well and in measurement intervals. To get insights in the 3D characteristics of the heat transport mechanisms, temperature data from a large number of observation wells closely spaced along three transects were used. Temperature breakthrough curves in observation wells are contrasted with what would be expected in an ideal layered aquifer. They reveal strongly unequal lateral and vertical components of the transport mechanisms. The observed complex behavior of the heat plume is explained by the groundwater flow gradient on the site and heterogeneities in the hydraulic conductivity field. Moreover, due to high injection temperatures during the field experiment a temperature-induced fluid density effect on heat transport occurred. By using a flow and heat transport numerical model with variable density coupled with a pilot point approach for inversion of the hydraulic conductivity field, the main preferential flow paths were delineated. The successful application of a field heat tracer test at this site suggests that heat tracer tests is a promising approach to image hydraulic conductivity field. This methodology could be applied in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) projects for assessing future efficiency that is strongly linked to the hydraulic conductivity variability in the considered aquifer. [less ▲]

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See detailElectromagnetic Investigation of the Pb-Zn deposit of Lontzen, Belgium
Evrard, Maxime ULg; Pirard, Eric ULg; Nguyen, Frédéric ULg

in First International Conference: MINING IN EUROPE, ABTSRACT volume (2016, May)

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See detailTime lapse imaging of water content with geoelectrical methods: on the interest of working with absolute water content data
Dumont, Gaël ULg; Pilawski, Tamara ULg; Robert, Tanguy et al

Poster (2016, April 21)

The electrical resistivity tomography is a suitable method to estimate the water content of a waste material and detect changes in water content. Various ERT profiles, both static data and time-lapse ... [more ▼]

The electrical resistivity tomography is a suitable method to estimate the water content of a waste material and detect changes in water content. Various ERT profiles, both static data and time-lapse, where acquired on a landfill during the Minerve project. In the literature, the relative change of resistivity ( Delta rho/rho ) is generally computed. For saline or heat tracer tests in the saturated zone, the Delta rho/rho can be easily translated into pore water conductivity or underground temperature changes (provided that the initial salinity or temperature condition is homogeneous over the ERT panel extension). For water content changes in the vadose zone resulting of an infiltration event or injection experiment, many authors also work with the Delta rho/rho or relative changes of water content Delta theta /theta (linked to the change of resistivity through one single parameter: the Archie’s law exponent “m”). This parameter is not influenced by the underground temperature and pore fluid conductivity ( rho_w) condition but is influenced by the initial water content distribution. Therefore, you never know if the loss of / signal is representative of the limit of the infiltration front or more humid initial condition. Another approach for the understanding of the infiltration process is the assessment of the absolute change of water content ( Delta theta ). This requires the direct computation of the water content of the waste from the resistivity data. For that purpose, we used petrophysical laws calibrated with laboratory experiments and our knowledge of the in situ temperature and pore fluid conductivity parameters. Then, we investigated water content changes in the waste material after a rainfall event ( Delta theta = Delta theta /theta * theta ). This new observation is really representatives of the quantity of water infiltrated in the waste material. However, the uncertainty in the pore fluid conductivity value may influence the computed water changes ( Delta theta =k*m*(rho_w)^1/2 ; where “m” is the Archie’s law exponent). Using these two complementary approaches, we analyzed the effect a major rainfall (20-30 mm in 2 hours) that occurred on the test site, characterized by a vegetalized and relatively dry zone and a devegatelized and humid zone. We intended to prove that most of the information contained in the Delta theta /theta distribution is the initial water content distribution in the ground.Water addition in dry zones resulting in large relative changes. The computation of the Delta theta is necessary to demonstrate preferential infiltration through the capping in a restricted zone of the vegetalized area. [less ▲]

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See detailHeat tracer test in an alluvial aquifer: field experiment and inverse modelling
Klepikova, Maria; Wildemeersch, Samuel; Jamin, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2016, April 20)

Using heat as an active tracer for aquifer characterization is a topic of increasing interest. In this study, we investigate the potential of using heat tracer tests for characterization of a shallow ... [more ▼]

Using heat as an active tracer for aquifer characterization is a topic of increasing interest. In this study, we investigate the potential of using heat tracer tests for characterization of a shallow alluvial aquifer. A thermal tracer test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer of the Meuse River, Belgium. The tracing experiment consisted in simultaneously injecting heated water and a dye tracer in a piezometer and monitoring the evolution of groundwater temperature and tracer concentration in the recovery well and in monitoring wells. To get insights in the 3D characteristics of the heat transport mechanisms, temperature data from a large number of observation wells distributed throughout the field site (space-filling arrangement) were used. Temperature breakthrough curves in observation wells are contrasted with what would be expected in an ideal layered aquifer. They reveal strongly unequal lateral and vertical components of the transport mechanisms. The observed complex behavior of the heat plume was explained by the groundwater flow gradient on the site and heterogeneity of hydraulic conductivity field. Moreover, due to high injection temperatures during the field experiment a temperature-induced fluid density effect on heat transport occurred. By using a flow and heat transport numerical model with variable density coupled with the pilot point inverse approach, main preferential flow paths were delineated. [less ▲]

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See detailData-driven selection of the minimum-gradient support parameter in time-lapse focused electrical imaging
Nguyen, Frédéric ULg; Kemna, Andreas; Robert, Tanguy et al

in Geophysics (2016), 81(1), 1-5

We have considered the problem of the choice of the minimum-gradient support (MGS) parameter in focused inversion for time-lapse (TL) electric resistivity tomography. Most existing approaches have relied ... [more ▼]

We have considered the problem of the choice of the minimum-gradient support (MGS) parameter in focused inversion for time-lapse (TL) electric resistivity tomography. Most existing approaches have relied either on an arbitrary choice of this parameter or one based on the prior information, such as the expected contrast in the TL image. We have decided to select the MGS parameter using a line search based on the value of the TL data root-mean-square misfit at the first iteration of the nonlinear inversion procedure. The latter was based on a Gauss-Newton scheme minimizing a regularized objective function in which the regularization functional was defined by the MGS functional. The regularization parameter was optimized to achieve a certain target level, following the Occam principles. We have validated our approach on a synthetic benchmark using a complex and heterogeneous model and determined its effectiveness on electric tomography TL data collected during a salt tracer experiment in fractured limestone. Our results have determined that the approach was successful in retrieving the focused anomaly and did not rely on prior information. [less ▲]

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See detailElectrical resistivity tomography to monitor enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale
Masy, Thibaut ULg; Caterina, David; Tromme, Oliver et al

in Journal of Contaminant Hydrology (2016), 184

Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of ... [more ▼]

Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on the environment affected and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to overcome these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was to isolate an electrical signal linked to an enhanced bacterial activity with ERT, in an aged HC-contaminated clayey loam soil. To achieve this, a pilot tank was built to mimic field conditions. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600 ppm) in 3 months in the center of the contaminated zone, where pollutants were less bioavailable. In the meantime, lithological heterogeneities and microbial activities (growth and biosurfactant production) were successively discriminated by ERT images. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be more and more transferred to the field in order to monitor biodegradation processes and assist in selecting the most appropriate remediation technique. [less ▲]

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See detailCovariance-constrained difference inversion of time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography data
Hermans, Thomas ULg; Kemna, Andreas; Nguyen, Frédéric ULg

in Geophysics (2016), 81(5), 311-322

Hydrogeophysics has become a major field of research in the past two decades and time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is one of the most popular techniques to monitor passive and active ... [more ▼]

Hydrogeophysics has become a major field of research in the past two decades and time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is one of the most popular techniques to monitor passive and active processes in shallow subsurface reservoirs. Time-lapse inversion schemes have been developed to refine inversion results, but they mostly still rely on a spatial regularization procedure based on the standard smoothness constraint. In this paper, we propose to apply a covariance-based regularization operator in the time-lapse ERT inverse problem. We first illustrate the method for surface and cross-hole ERT with two synthetic cases and compare the results with the smoothness-constrained inversion (SCI). The examples show that the covariance–constrained inversions (CCI) better image the anomaly both in terms of shape and amplitude. Although more important in low-sensitivity zones, improvements are observed everywhere in the tomograms. Those synthetic examples also show that an error made in the range or in the type of the variogram model has a limited impact on the resulting image, which still remains better than SCI. The method is then applied to cross-borehole ERT field data from a heat tracing experiment, where the comparison with direct measurements shows a strong improvement of the breakthrough curves retrieved from ERT. The proposed method could be extended to the time dimension which would allow the use of CCI in 4D inversion schemes. [less ▲]

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See detailFlow cytometry community fingerprinting and amplicon sequencing for the assessment of landfill leachate cellulolytic bioaugmentation
Kinet, Romain ULg; Dzaomuho, Phidias; Baert, Jonathan ULg et al

in Bioresource Technology (2016)

Flow cytometry (FCM) is a high throughput single cell technology that is actually becoming widely used for studying phenotypic and genotypic diversity among microbial communities. This technology is ... [more ▼]

Flow cytometry (FCM) is a high throughput single cell technology that is actually becoming widely used for studying phenotypic and genotypic diversity among microbial communities. This technology is considered in this work for the assessment of a bioaugmentation treatment in order to enhance cellulolytic potential of landfill leachate. The experimental results reveal the relevant increase of leachate cellulolytic potential due to bioaugmentation. Cytometric monitoring of microbial dynamics along these assays is then realized. The Flow FP package is used to establish microbial samples fingerprint from initial 2D cytometry histograms. This procedure allows highlighting microbial communities' variation along the assays. Cytometric and 16S rRNA gene sequencing fingerprinting methods are then compared. The two approaches give same evidence about microbial dynamics throughout digestion assay. There are however a lack of significant correlation between cytometric and amplicon sequencing fingerprint at genus or species level. Same phenotypical profiles of microbiota during assays matched to several 16S rRNA gene sequencing ones. Flow cytometry fingerprinting can thus be considered as a promising routine on-site method suitable for the detection of stability/variation/disturbance of complex microbial communities involved in bioprocesses. [less ▲]

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See detailHeterogeneous bedrock investigation for a closed-loop geothermal system: A case study
Radioti, Georgia ULg; Delvoie, Simon ULg; Charlier, Robert ULg et al

in Geothermics (2016)

This paper investigates bedrock heterogeneity by applying three different geophysical approaches, in order to study the long-term behaviour and the interaction between closed-loop geothermal systems. The ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates bedrock heterogeneity by applying three different geophysical approaches, in order to study the long-term behaviour and the interaction between closed-loop geothermal systems. The investigated site consists of four boreholes equipped with geothermal pipes on the campus of University of Liege, Belgium. The first approach includes acoustic borehole imaging, gamma-ray logging and cuttings observation and results to a detailed fracture characterisation, rock identification and layer dip angle determination. The second approach consists of measuring the thermal conductivity of cuttings at the laboratory. Study of cuttings thermal conductivity measurements can contribute to bedrock heterogeneity knowledge concerning the transition of one formation to another and the layer dipping. The third approach is based on high-resolution temperature profiles, measured during the hardening of the grouting material and the recovery phase of a Distributed Thermal Response Test. Through this approach a correlation of the temperature profiles to the geological characteristics of the surrounding bedrock is identified. The analysis of this correlation can provide information on fractured zones, alternation of different rock types and layering dipping. This latter approach can be easily applied on closed-loop geothermal systems to characterise the bedrock and investigate its heterogeneity as well as contribute to the their long-term behaviour prediction and to the optimisation of their efficiency. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluating the performance of short-term heat storage in alluvial aquifer with 4D electrical resistivity tomography and hydrological monitoring
Robert, Tanguy; Paulus, Claire; Bolly, Pierre-Yves et al

Poster (2015, December 14)

In the context of energy demand side management (DSM), energy storage solutions are needed to stock energy during high production periods and recover energy during high demand periods. Among currently ... [more ▼]

In the context of energy demand side management (DSM), energy storage solutions are needed to stock energy during high production periods and recover energy during high demand periods. Among currently studied solutions, storing energy in the subsurface through heat pumps and/or exchangers (thermal energy storage) is relatively simple with low investment costs. However, the design and functioning of such systems have strong interconnections with the geology of the site which may be complex and heterogeneous, making predictions difficult. In this context, local temperature measurements are necessary but not sufficient to model heat flow and transport in the subsurface. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) provides spatially distributed information on the temperature distribution in the subsurface. In this study, we monitored, with 4D ERT combined with multiple hydrological measurements in available wells, a short-term heat storage experiment in a confined alluvial aquifer. We injected heated water (ΔT=30K) during 6 hours with a rate of 3 m³/h, stored during 3 days, and then we pumped it back to estimate the energy balance. We collected ERT data sets using 9 parallel profiles of 21 electrodes and cross-lines measurements. Inversion results clearly show the ability of ERT to delimit the thermal plume growth during injection, the diffusion and decrease of temperature during storage, and the decrease in size after pumping. Quantitative interpretation of ERT is difficult at this stage due to strong spatial variations of the total dissolved solid content in the aquifer, due to historical chloride contamination of the site. Energy balance shows that up to 75% of the energy can be easily recovered with an adapted strategy in the context of DSM. Short-term heat storage in alluvial aquifer is efficient and ERT is a valuable tool to image and estimate the temperature distribution in the subsurface. [less ▲]

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See detailTime-lapse inversion of ERT monitoring data using variogram-based regularization
Hermans, Thomas ULg; Dumont, Gaël ULg; Kemna, Andreas et al

Conference (2015, November 24)

Hydrogeophysics has become a major field of research in the past two decades and time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is one of the most popular techniques to monitor passive and active ... [more ▼]

Hydrogeophysics has become a major field of research in the past two decades and time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is one of the most popular techniques to monitor passive and active processes in subsurface reservoirs. Time-lapse inversion schemes have been developed to refine inversion results; but, in contrast with static inversion, they mostly still rely on the spatial regularization procedure based on the standard smoothness constraint. In this contribution, we propose to apply a variogram-based regularization operator in the time-lapse ERT inverse problem, using the model difference covariance matrix to replace the standard smoothing operator. The variogram of resistivity variations can be computed through independent borehole data, such as electromagnetic logs or hydrogeological monitoring, which is often available during monitoring experiments. We first illustrate the method for surface ERT with a synthetic case and compare the results with the standard smoothness constraint solution. This example shows that the variogram-based constraint images better the assumed anomaly both in terms of shape and amplitude. The improvement is largely higher than the one obtained with more classical anisotropic smoothness constraint. This synthetic example also shows that an error made in the range of the variogram has a limited impact on the resulting image, which still remains better than the smoothness constraint result. Anomalies located in various part of the tomograms were tested. Although more crucial in low-sensitivity zones, improvements are observed everywhere in the tomograms. The method is then applied to cross-borehole ERT field data from a heat tracing experiment, where the comparison with direct temperature measurements shows a strong improvement of the breakthrough curves retrieved from ERT. Using the variogram-based regularization, it is possible to reduce the smoothing of resistivity variations in low sensitivity zones and therefore to avoid overestimation of temperatures. The proposed method could be extended to the time dimension which would allow the use of variogram-based constraints in 4D inversion schemes. [less ▲]

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See detailERT monitoring of water infiltration process through a landfill cover layer
Dumont, Gaël ULg; Pilawski, Tamara ULg; Robert, Tanguy et al

in Berichte der Geologischen Bundesanstalt, 112 (2015, November)

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See detailIntegration of geophysical data in hydrogeological models
Hermans, Thomas ULg; Beaujean, Jean; Nguyen, Frédéric ULg

Conference (2015, October 23)

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See detailWe gme P08: Fiber-optic temperature profiles analysis for closed-loop geothermal systems-a case study
Radioti, Georgia ULg; Delvoie, Simon ULg; Sartor, Kevin ULg et al

in Second EAGE Workshop on Geomechanics and Energy: The ground as energy source and storage (2015, October)

In order to study the behaviour of shallow closed-loop geothermal systems four borehole heat exchangers equipped with fiber optics were installed on the campus of the University of Liege (Liege, Belgium ... [more ▼]

In order to study the behaviour of shallow closed-loop geothermal systems four borehole heat exchangers equipped with fiber optics were installed on the campus of the University of Liege (Liege, Belgium) over a surface area of 32m². This paper presents the analysis of continuous, high-resolution temperature profiles measured along the boreholes length. The undisturbed ground temperature measurements indicate heat loss from ground structures located close to the boreholes. A 3D numerical model is presented to reproduce the measured temperature profiles. Temperature profiles during hardening of the grouting material indicate extended fractured zones in the rock mass. Temperature measurements during the recovery phase of a Distributed Thermal Response Test indicate the succession of rock layers with different mineral content. The results are in good agreement with those of the borehole televiewer logging method. The presented analysis could provide information on bedrock heterogeneity, on the anisotropic thermal behaviour of the rock mass and on the ground temperature variations due to heat loss from ground structures. These information could significantly contribute to the long-term behaviour prediction of the geothermal system and the geothermal reservoir potential. [less ▲]

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