References of "Munos, Delphine"
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See detailDiasporic Hereafters in Jhumpa Lahiri’s “Once in a Lifetime”
Munos, Delphine ULg

in Schultermandl, Silvia; Toplu, Sebnem (Eds.) A Fluid Sense of Self: The Politics of Transnational Identity (2011)

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See detailRelationality and the Transnational Indian Family in Shauna Singh Baldwin’s “Nothing Must Spoil This Visit”
Munos, Delphine ULg

in Postcolonial Text (2011), 6(1),

In Shauna Singh Baldwin’s “Nothing Must Spoil this Visit,” Arvind, a Toronto-based Sikh, returns to the homeland to visit his family with his new wife Janet, a white Canadian of Hungarian origin. Drawing ... [more ▼]

In Shauna Singh Baldwin’s “Nothing Must Spoil this Visit,” Arvind, a Toronto-based Sikh, returns to the homeland to visit his family with his new wife Janet, a white Canadian of Hungarian origin. Drawing on Sara Ahmed’s critique of the general consensus within post-colonial theory that automatically conflates migration with the transgression of boundaries and the destabilisation of identity, this article discusses Baldwin’s short story with a view to showing how the Indian context proves crucial in deconstructing the intersecting forms of fetishism upon which Arvind’s and Janet’s multicultural and inter-relationship is based. In this return narrative, it is striking that the transnational tendencies of the contemporary world are definitely not an occasion for creating more border-crossings, more plurality, more confrontations and interaction. The encounter with otherness is indeed presented by Baldwin as always-already framed by broader relations of power that are far from being acknowledged as such. What is at stake in this text, I argue, is the somehow counterintuitive truth that migration might well work in favour of, not against, fixed notions of identity. [less ▲]

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See detailGender, Migration and Agency: Developing a “Hauntology” of New Becomings in Shauna Singh Baldwin’s “Devika” and in Ginu Kamani’s “Just Between Indians”
Munos, Delphine ULg

in Acta Scientiarum. Language and Culture (2011), 33(1), 23-29

In recent short stories written by diasporic Indian women writers, changes in terms of location or national identity are generally depicted as providing significant opportunities for Indian women to ... [more ▼]

In recent short stories written by diasporic Indian women writers, changes in terms of location or national identity are generally depicted as providing significant opportunities for Indian women to challenge and revise culturally-inscribed gender roles. In two collections of short stories written respectively by Ginu Kamani and Shauna Singh Baldwin, Junglee Girl and English Lessons and Other Stories, not only are ghosts employed to rupture boundaries between the living and the dead, but they also represent enabling presences which authorize female voices by resurrecting stories of women that have been silenced or forgotten. In these two books, the emergence of the archaic is recurrently tinged with liberating undertones since it opens up new spaces for identity by countering gendered expectations of ‘acceptable’ behaviour and by constructing alternative realities. My essay will therefore focus on the central metaphors of female ghosts and doubles as transitional figures through which women in transit empower themselves. My aim is to show how culturally displaced women appropriate the uncanny so as to engender new identities and assert the value of individual female experience. In these haunted narratives, I will contend, women move from a ghostly time of repetition to a ‘hauntology’ of new becomings. [less ▲]

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See detailV.S. Naipaul's The Enigma of Arrival
Munos, Delphine ULg

in Clark, Robert; Sandru, Cristina (Eds.) The Literary Encyclopedia (2010)

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See detailPossessed by Whiteness: Interracial Affiliations and Racial Melancholia in Mohsin Hamid's The Reluctant Fundamentalist
Munos, Delphine ULg

Conference (2010, June 08)

Towards the end of the 20th century, as the propagation of new discourses of ethnic success generated new versions of the American Dream, “America” came to signify not only immigrant mobility and ... [more ▼]

Towards the end of the 20th century, as the propagation of new discourses of ethnic success generated new versions of the American Dream, “America” came to signify not only immigrant mobility and whiteness, but also multiculturalism. As Inderpal Grewal argues in Transnational America, this paradox of sorts was only made possible through a slippage in the meaning of “white,” within which whiteness still connoted Anglo-America, yet extended its meaning to include a more heterogeneous group that passed as white through the endorsement of culturally-specific consumerist practices and middle-class norms of behaviour. Posing as multicultural yet covertly fastening whiteness to an ideal Americanness, these so-called “new” versions of the American Dream elevated the Asian American community to “model minority” status, thus contributing to rationalize away the lure that a “relative whiteness” could somehow be acquired by non-white minority groups. Drawing on whiteness studies and psychoanalytical theory, my paper will explore representations of interracial relationships as a means to claim and/or contest the ideal of whiteness in Mohsin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist. In Hamid’s novel, the 9/11 attacks trigger a crisis in self-identification for model-minority protagonist Changez, which proves illuminating in terms of the invisible racial subjugation exerted so far onto him by Jim, Changez’s passport into the corporate world, and by Erica, his (white) lifeline to exclusive Manhattan. My paper will focus on the ways in which Hamid uses the post 9/11 context to reveal the racial melancholia surreptitiously informing today’s “new” versions of the American Dream, which is apparent in Changez’s and Erica’s relationship as well as in their parallel impossible mourning of the broken mirror of “white” Am/Erica. Emphasizing the extent to which whiteness and racial melancholia permeate the discourse of assimilation, Hamid’s book rewrites the “new” American Dream as a “fantasy built on absences” (Anne Anlin Cheng). [less ▲]

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See detailA Place Within: Rediscovering India
Munos, Delphine ULg

in South Asian Diaspora (2010), 2(1), 139-141

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See detailMohsin Hamid blanchit le fondamentalisme
Munos, Delphine ULg

Article for general public (2010)

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See detailGiving up the Ghosts: Diaspora and its Hereafter in “Once in a Lifetime” by Jhumpa Lahiri
Munos, Delphine ULg

Conference (2009, May 23)

In spite of diasporic subjectivity being recurrently conceptualised through a rhetoric of “fluidity,” “multiple affiliations” and “national non-attachment,” today’s literature of the Indian diaspora ... [more ▼]

In spite of diasporic subjectivity being recurrently conceptualised through a rhetoric of “fluidity,” “multiple affiliations” and “national non-attachment,” today’s literature of the Indian diaspora reveals that the “un-transnational” ideology of the return is still running deep in the first and second-generation migrant imaginary. Vijay Mishra’s recent attempt to explore the idea of “writing diaspora” in an analogy with writing trauma or writing mourning is illuminating in this respect, because it constitutes a theoretical framework able to bear witness to the maintenance of a diasporic imaginary structured by the loss of the Motherland, whether this loss involves firsthand experience of migration or originates from a “phantom loss” refigured by the second generation. Drawing on Mishra’s theorizing of the diasporic imaginary, my paper will explore Jhumpa Lahiri’s representation of the second generation’s “inheritance of loss” in “Once in a Lifetime,” the short-story opening Unaccustomed Earth’s trilogy. By narrating Hema’s and Kaushik’s parallel journey from childhood to early adulthood, Lahiri rewrites the notion of return as melancholic attachments through which the unsymbolizable gap left by the absence of the Motherland can be represented, renegotiated and perhaps then, put to rest. In my paper, I wish to show that not only does Lahiri use melancholy as a means of representing second-generation subjectivities haunted by impossible mourning and unclaimed legacies, but also that she rehabilitates the notion of return as a way of envisaging a diasporic future that is swarming with ghosts. In that sense, Lahiri illustrates that the notion of homeland and the trope of the return can also be associated with a promise of futurity. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri: The Accident of Inheritance
Munos, Delphine ULg

in Commonwealth : Essays and Studies (2008), 30(Spring), 106-117

In The Namesake, Jhumpa Lahiri narrates the tortuous route from childhood to early adulthood of Gogol Ganguli, a U.S.-born descendant of Indian immigrants whose name bears the stigmas of a Bengali ... [more ▼]

In The Namesake, Jhumpa Lahiri narrates the tortuous route from childhood to early adulthood of Gogol Ganguli, a U.S.-born descendant of Indian immigrants whose name bears the stigmas of a Bengali practice of nomenclature curtailed by American law. While Gogol’s fixation on his mismatched name reveals his desperate quest for origin, it also signals his struggle to cope with his broken genealogy and his rerouted filiation. Through Gogol’s predicament, Lahiri indeed points to the paradoxes of identity construction for those among second-generation “desis” who have confused filial and affiliative bonds with their present and their ancestry. In this essay, I will particularly draw on the critical concept of the relation between filiation and affiliation developed by Edward Said in his article “Secular Criticism” so as to demonstrate how affiliation can surreptitiously sustain the quest for a sense of “total” identity through cultural exclusivism. By approaching The Namesake along the general axis of filiation and affiliation, I wish to show how Lahiri uses Gogol’s derailed af/filiations to investigate the stock theme of cultural hybridity while proposing a new understanding of the circuitous logic of inheritance and the obliqueness of identity. [less ▲]

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See detailNirad Chaudhuri et V.S. Naipaul: Une identité postcoloniale à la jointure de l'Inde et de l'Angleterre
Munos, Delphine ULg

Master of advanced studies dissertation (2005)

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