References of "Moonen, Gustave"
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See detailIdentification of Psf, the Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein-Associated Splicing Factor, as a Developmentally Regulated Neuronal Protein
Chanas-Sacre, Grazyna; Mazy-Servais, Cécile; Wattiez, Ruddy et al

in Journal of Neuroscience Research (1999), 57(1), 62-73

The polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF), which plays an essential role in mammalian spliceosomes, has been found to be expressed by differentiating neurons in developing ... [more ▼]

The polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF), which plays an essential role in mammalian spliceosomes, has been found to be expressed by differentiating neurons in developing mouse brain. The sequence of a fragment of mouse PSF was found to be remarkably similar to that of human PSF. Both the expression of PSF mRNA in cortex and cerebellum and PSF immunoreactivity in all brain areas were high during embryonic and early postnatal life and almost disappeared in adult tissue, except in the hippocampus and olfactory bulb where various neuronal populations remained PSF-immunopositive. Double-labeling experiments with anti-PSF antibody and anti-neurofilaments or anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein antibodies on sections of cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum indicate that PSF is expressed by differentiating neurons but not by astrocytic cells. In vitro, mouse PSF was found to be expressed by differentiating cortical and cerebellar neurons. Radial glia or astrocyte nuclei were not immunopositive; however, oligodendrocytes differentiating in vitro were found to express PSF. The restricted expression of PSF suggests that this splicing factor could be involved in the control of neuronal-specific splicing events occurring at particular stages of neuronal differentiation and maturation. [less ▲]

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See detailGrafts of Meningeal Fibroblasts in Adult Rat Spinal Cord Lesion Promote Axonal Regrowth
Franzen, Rachelle ULg; Martin, Didier ULg; Daloze, A. et al

in Neuroreport (1999), 10(7), 1551-6

We have studied the morphological consequences of implantation into the injured adult rat spinal cord of fibroblasts derived from the meninges overlying the cerebral cortex. Our initial objective was to ... [more ▼]

We have studied the morphological consequences of implantation into the injured adult rat spinal cord of fibroblasts derived from the meninges overlying the cerebral cortex. Our initial objective was to reproduce the well known post-traumatic fibroadhesive scar observed in the clinical situation. One month after implantation, instead of having formed a fibroadhesive scar, fibroblasts had promoted the regeneration of peptidergic axons originating from dorsal root afferents and, to a lesser extent, of supraspinal serotonergic fibers at the periphery of the grafts. Using RT-PCR we were able to identify in cultures of meningeal-derived fibroblasts mRNAs for beta-NGF, NT3, aFGF and bFGF, which suggests that the promoting effect on axonal regeneration of these cells is at least in part due to their capacity to synthesize neurotrophic factors. [less ▲]

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See detailSclérose latérale amyotrophique
Moonen, Gustave ULg; WANG, François-Charles ULg

Scientific conference (1999, May 04)

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See detailNeurotransmitter-Mediated Regulation of Cns Myelination: A Review
Belachew, Shibeshih ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Rigo, Jean-Michel et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (1999), 99(1), 21-31

In addition to treatments aimed at preventing or limiting damage to myelin and oligodendrocytes, there is a crucial need for repair strategies in human demyelinating disorders. There is increasing ... [more ▼]

In addition to treatments aimed at preventing or limiting damage to myelin and oligodendrocytes, there is a crucial need for repair strategies in human demyelinating disorders. There is increasing evidence that besides growth factors, neurotransmitters can regulate different steps of the oligodendrogliogenesis. The present review on neurotransmitter receptor expression and function in the oligodendrocyte lineage emphasizes the concept that in this lineage cell proliferation and differentiation can be controlled through the modulation of the functional state of channel proteins and receptors, such as the delayed K+ rectifier, the AMPA/kainate, dopamine or muscarinic receptors, and, most likely, others yet to be found. We anticipate that a better understanding of the neurotransmitter-mediated neuronal oligodendroglial communication network opens prospects in the field of central nervous system (CNS) myelin repair, allowing the recruitment of the myelinating machinery that is known to remain present but quiescent in the CNS of multiple sclerosis patients. [less ▲]

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See detailOligodendrocytes: From Development to Demyelinated Lesion Repair
Rogister, Bernard ULg; Belachew, Shibeshih ULg; Moonen, Gustave ULg

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (1999), 99(1), 32-9

Spontaneous but incomplete remyelination is observed after a demyelinating lesion. We know since ten years now that oligodendrocyte progenitors, (OP) and totipotent neural stem cells remain present in the ... [more ▼]

Spontaneous but incomplete remyelination is observed after a demyelinating lesion. We know since ten years now that oligodendrocyte progenitors, (OP) and totipotent neural stem cells remain present in the central nervous system of adult mammals. [less ▲]

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See detailNeonatal rat organ of Corti forms supernumerary hair cells in response to growth factor treatment
Malgrange, B; LEFEBVRE, Philippe ULg; Rigo, J-M et al

Poster (1999)

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See detailA 295 kDa intermediate filament-associated protein in radial glial and developing muscle cells in vivo and in vitro
Leprince, P; Chanas-Sacré, G; Thiry, Marc ULg et al

Poster (1999)

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See detailCultured Oligodendrocyte Progenitors Derived from Cerebral Cortex Express a Glycine Receptor Which Is Pharmacologically Distinct from the Neuronal Isoform
Belachew, Shibeshih ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Rigo, Jean-Michel et al

in European Journal of Neuroscience (1998), 10(11), 3556-64

Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we demonstrate glycine-induced currents in oligosphere-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors cultured from newborn rats. Similar inward currents are also ... [more ▼]

Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we demonstrate glycine-induced currents in oligosphere-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors cultured from newborn rats. Similar inward currents are also triggered by beta-alanine and taurine, two established glycine receptor agonists. In our recording conditions, glycine-gated currents in oligodendrocyte progenitors reverse about 0 mV and are reversibly inhibited by the glycine competitive antagonist strychnine, the Cl- channel blocker picrotoxinin and the non-competitive antagonist cyanotriphenylborate. The oligodendrocyte progenitors glycine receptor (GlyR) differs from the corresponding neuronal receptor: [3H]strychnine binding data and the strychnine inhibition curve of glycine-induced currents in oligodendrocyte progenitor cultures suggest the existence of two strychnine binding sites on the oligodendroglial GlyR. Using total RNA isolated from oligodendrocyte progenitors cultures, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of glycine receptor subunit expression shows the presence of alpha2 and beta subunits and immunocytochemical stainings confirm that this GlyR contains an alpha subunit which is not alpha1. The molecular structure of the oligodendroglial GlyR could be either homopentameric alpha2 or heteromeric alpha2beta but in both cases, the sequence of the alpha2 or beta subunits have to be different from the known neuronal sequences in order to explain, respectively, the cyanotriphenylborate (alpha2) and picrotoxinin (beta) sensitivities. This work thus demonstrates that GlyR are expressed by oligodendrocytes obtained not only from spinal cord but also from supraspinal structures. The pharmacological properties and presumably the molecular structure of oligodendroglial GlyR are original. The physiological meaning of the presence of such receptors on developing and mature oligodendrocytes remains unknown. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of Growth Factors and Their Receptors in the Postnatal Rat Cochlea
Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg; LEFEBVRE, Philippe ULg et al

in Neurochemical Research (1998), 23(8), 1133-8

RT-PCR was used to assay for growth factors and receptors from seven different protein families in cochlea tissues of the juvenile rat. There was a broad representation of the growth factor families in ... [more ▼]

RT-PCR was used to assay for growth factors and receptors from seven different protein families in cochlea tissues of the juvenile rat. There was a broad representation of the growth factor families in all the cochlea tissues examined, though the organ of Corti and stria vascularis expressed a greater variety than the spiral ganglion. This broad expression suggests that a variety of known growth factors play significant roles in the development, maintenance, and repair of the inner ear. The results of this survey serve as a basis for the design of future in vitro experiments that will address the ability of growth factors to protect hair cells from damage and to evoke a repair-regeneration response by injured hair cells. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopmental Regulation of Neuroligand-Induced Responses in Cultured Oligodendroglia
Belachew, Shibeshih ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Rigo, Jean-Michel et al

in Neuroreport (1998), 9(6), 973-80

Using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques, we show that oligosphere-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OP) display GABA-, glutamate-, 5-HT-, glycine- and acetylcholine-gated inward currents. When OP ... [more ▼]

Using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques, we show that oligosphere-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OP) display GABA-, glutamate-, 5-HT-, glycine- and acetylcholine-gated inward currents. When OP differentiate into oligodendrocytes (ODC), the amplitude of peak currents elicited by saturating concentrations of these transmitters decreases except for 5-HT. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration changes induced by microperfusion of glutamate, 5-HT, TRH, met-enkephalin and substance P were monitored using a fluo-3-based calcium imaging system. When OP cells differentiate into ODC, a global decrease of the proportion of responding cells is observed. During type-2 astrocytes commitment, this proportion decreases for 5-HT, TRH- and metenkephalin stimulations whereas it remains constant for substance P and glutamate. These data demonstrate a development regulation of neurotransmitter- and neuropeptide-induced responses within the oligodendroglial lineage. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Macrophage Transplantation in the Injured Adult Rat Spinal Cord: A Combined Immunocytochemical and Biochemical Study
Franzen, Rachelle ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Journal of Neuroscience Research (1998), 51(3), 316-27

Early and robust invasion by macrophages may be one of the reasons why axonal regeneration is more effective in the PNS than in the CNS. Therefore, we have grafted autologous peritoneal macrophages ... [more ▼]

Early and robust invasion by macrophages may be one of the reasons why axonal regeneration is more effective in the PNS than in the CNS. Therefore, we have grafted autologous peritoneal macrophages labeled with fluorescent latex microspheres into spinal cord compression lesions. At various survival times, we have studied their effect on the expression of neuronal (neurofilaments [NF], calcitonin gene-related peptide [CGRP], 5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) and nonneuronal markers (myelin-associated glycoprotein [MAG], glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP], laminin) by using semiquantitative Western blot and immunohistochemical techniques. After 1 month, we observed a significant decrease of the expression of MAG as well as an important invasion of the lesion site by neurites, chiefly peptidergic axons of presumed dorsal root origin, in macrophage-grafted animals compared with controls. In addition, angiogenesis and Schwann cell infiltration were more pronounced after macrophage grafts, providing an increase in laminin, a favorable substrate for axonal regrowth. By using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), mRNAs for tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were detected in the transplanted cells, whereas results were negative for nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), or acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Thus, macrophage grafts may represent an interesting strategy to promote axonal regeneration in the CNS. Our study suggests that they may exert their beneficial effects by degrading myelin products, which inhibit axonal regrowth, and by promoting a permissive extracellular matrix containing notably laminin. No evidence for a direct synthesis of neurotrophic factors by the transplanted macrophages was found in this study, but resident glial cells could secrete such factors as a result of stimulation by macrophage-released cytokines. [less ▲]

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See detailMammalian auditory hair cell regeneration/repair and protection: a review and future directions.
Feghali, J. G.; Lefèbvre, Philippe ULg; Staecker, H. et al

in Ear, Nose, & Throat Journal (1998), 77(4), 276280282-5

Regeneration/repair and protection of auditory hair cells and auditory neurons is an exciting, rapidly evolving field. Simultaneous developments in the fields of otobiology and surgical otology have led ... [more ▼]

Regeneration/repair and protection of auditory hair cells and auditory neurons is an exciting, rapidly evolving field. Simultaneous developments in the fields of otobiology and surgical otology have led to new and exciting possibilities in inner ear medicine and surgery; specifically, the treatment or prevention of a variety of types of hearing losses in the foreseeable future. Sensorineural hearing loss in humans is commonly associated with a loss of auditory hair cells. It has been generally accepted that hearing loss resulting from hair cell damage is irreversible because the human ear has been considered to be incapable of regenerating or repairing these sensory elements following severe injury. An organ of Corti explant study has shown that it is possible to initiate the regeneration/repair of mammalian hair cells. In this study, ototoxin-damaged organ of Corti explants from juvenile rats were treated with a combination of retinoic acid (10-8M) and fetal calf serum (10%). TGF-alpha has been identified as a growth factor capable of evoking auditory hair cell regeneration/repair in ototoxin-damaged organ of Corti explants. Preliminary in vitro experiments with juvenile rat organ of Corti explants and in vivo studies in the cochleae of adult guinea pigs indicate that pretreatment followed by continuous treatment of the inner ear with a combination of retinoic acid and TGF-alpha can protect the auditory hair cells from the ototoxic effects of aminoglycosides. Because the integrity of spiral ganglion neurons is also essential for normal auditory function, there is a parallel series of in vitro and in vivo studies of the effects of neurotrophic factors on the survival of auditory neurons and the regeneration of injured neuronal processes. Clinical studies have demonstrated that it is now possible to perform surgeries on the inner ear, i.e., partial or total labyrinthectomies, and maintain hearing. The field of cochlear implantation has also provided insights into both the short- and long-term effects of cochlear fenestration on inner ear function. Administration of growth factors to the inner ears of animals is now possible with the use of implanted catheters and miniature infusion pumps. These advances suggest that localized application of drugs to the human inner ear may be feasible. The aim of this paper has been to provide an overview of advances in the study of the biology of auditory hair cells and auditory neurons, as well as recent relevant surgical advances. Taken together, these advances in otobiology and surgery will, in the future, be combined to devise new and innovative treatments for inner ear disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro ototoxicity of aminoglycosides and platin derivatives. A semi-automatic assay for sensory hair cell damage in explanted rat organ of corti.
Malgrange, B.; LEFEBVRE, Philippe ULg; van de Water, T.R. et al

in Toxicology in Vitro (1998), 12 (6)

The ototoxic damage that drugs such as neomycin, kanamycin, colistin, cisplatin, transplatin and carboplatin cause on outer and inner hair cells in postnatal day 3 rat cochlear explants was investigated ... [more ▼]

The ototoxic damage that drugs such as neomycin, kanamycin, colistin, cisplatin, transplatin and carboplatin cause on outer and inner hair cells in postnatal day 3 rat cochlear explants was investigated. Phalloidin-fluorescein conjugate-stained stereocilia bundles of sensory hair cells were quantified by video image analysis as a measurement of ototoxic effect. The video image quantification system established dose-response curves for ototoxic drugs (e.g. calculation of an IC50) and allowed comparisons between several ototoxins from the same family. This methodology provided the means to assess the efficacy of otoprotectant agents in preventing ototoxicity. Poly-l-aspartate (10-5M) and poly-l-glutamate (10-5M) protected auditory hair cells from neomycin (10-3M) toxicity while reduced glutathione (10-3M) provided protection against cisplatin (10-4M)-induced hair cell damage. [less ▲]

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See detailThe radial glial cell antigen recognized by the RC2 antibody is an intermediate-filament associated protein
Chanas-Sacré, G; Leprince, P; Lewin, M et al

Poster (1998)

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