References of "Moonen, Gustave"
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See detailLes accidents ischemiques transitoires: une nouvelle definition.
Moonen, Gustave ULg; Delcourt, Christian ULg; Lievens, I. et al

in Revue medicale de Liege (2004), 59(5), 281-5

According to its initial definition, which dates back more than 50 years, a transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a sudden focal neurologic deficit lasting for less than 24 hours, of presumed vascular origin ... [more ▼]

According to its initial definition, which dates back more than 50 years, a transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a sudden focal neurologic deficit lasting for less than 24 hours, of presumed vascular origin, and confined to an area of the brain or eye perfused by a specific artery. Recent data on the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia and the progress made by the imaging techniques have led an American TIA Working Group to propose a new definition which states that: "A transient ischemic attack is a brief episode of neurologic dysfunction, caused by local brain or retinal ischemia, with clinical symptoms typically lasting less than one hour, and without evidence of cerebral infarction". The advantages and limitations of this new definition, the need for an emergency medical care in the presence of a TIA, the clinical signs associated with this condition, the diagnostic work up, and the differential diagnosis are briefly discussed. A clinical example illustrates the difficulties that can be encountered in a case of TIA. [less ▲]

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See detailAuditory processing in severely brain injured patients: differences between the minimally conscious state and the persistent vegetative state.
Boly, Mélanie ULg; FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Archives of Neurology (2004), 61(2), 233-8

BACKGROUND: The minimally conscious state (MCS) is a recently defined clinical condition; it differs from the persistent vegetative state (PVS) by the presence of inconsistent, but clearly discernible ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The minimally conscious state (MCS) is a recently defined clinical condition; it differs from the persistent vegetative state (PVS) by the presence of inconsistent, but clearly discernible, behavioral evidence of consciousness. OBJECTIVE: To study auditory processing among patients who are in an MCS, patients who are in a PVS, and healthy control subjects. METHODS: By means of (15)O-radiolabeled water-positron emission tomography, we measured changes in regional cerebral blood flow induced by auditory click stimuli in 5 patients in an MCS, 15 patients in a PVS, and 18 healthy controls. RESULTS: In both patients in an MCS and the healthy controls, auditory stimulation activated bilateral superior temporal gyri (Brodmann areas 41, 42, and 22). In patients in a PVS, the activation was restricted to Brodmann areas 41 and 42 bilaterally. We also showed that, compared with patients in a PVS, patients in an MCS demonstrated a stronger functional connectivity between the secondary auditory cortex and temporal and prefrontal association cortices. CONCLUSIONS: Although assumptions about the level of consciousness in severely brain injured patients are difficult to make, our findings suggest that the cerebral activity observed in patients in an MCS is more likely to lead to higher-order integrative processes, thought to be necessary for the gain of conscious auditory perception. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain function in the vegetative state
Laureys, Steven ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; De Tiège, Xavier et al

in Brain Death and Disorders of Consciousness (2004)

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See detailNestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells favour the astroglial lineage in neural progenitors and stem cells by releasing active BMP4.
Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine ULg; Bruyere, Françoise ULg; Hans, Grégory ULg et al

in BMC Neuroscience (2004), 5

BACKGROUND: Spontaneous repair is limited after CNS injury or degeneration because neurogenesis and axonal regrowth rarely occur in the adult brain. As a result, cell transplantation has raised much ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Spontaneous repair is limited after CNS injury or degeneration because neurogenesis and axonal regrowth rarely occur in the adult brain. As a result, cell transplantation has raised much interest as potential treatment for patients with CNS lesions. Several types of cells have been considered as candidates for such cell transplantation and replacement therapies. Foetal brain tissue has already been shown to have significant effects in patients with Parkinson's disease. Clinical use of the foetal brain tissue is, however, limited by ethical and technical problems as it requires high numbers of grafted foetal cells and immunosuppression. Alternatively, several reports suggested that mesenchymal stem cells, isolated from adult bone marrow, are multipotent cells and could be used in autograft approach for replacement therapies. RESULTS: In this study, we addressed the question of the possible influence of mesenchymal stem cells on neural stem cell fate. We have previously reported that adult rat mesenchymal stem cells are able to express nestin in defined culture conditions (in the absence of serum and after 25 cell population doublings) and we report here that nestin-positive (but not nestin-negative) mesenchymal stem cells are able to favour the astroglial lineage in neural progenitors and stem cells cultivated from embryonic striatum. The increase of the number of GFAP-positive cells is associated with a significant decrease of the number of Tuj1- and O4-positive cells. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we demonstrate that mesenchymal stem cells express LIF, CNTF, BMP2 and BMP4 mRNAs, four cytokines known to play a role in astroglial fate decision. In this model, BMP4 is responsible for the astroglial stimulation and oligodendroglial inhibition, as 1) this cytokine is present in a biologically-active form only in nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium and 2) anti-BMP4 antibodies inhibit the nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium inducing effect on astrogliogenesis. CONCLUSIONS: When thinking carefully about mesenchymal stem cells as candidates for cellular therapy in neurological diseases, their effects on resident neural cell fate have to be considered. [less ▲]

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See detailResidual cerebral functioning in the vegetative state
Laureys, Steven ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; De Tiège, X. et al

in Arco di Giano (2004)

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See detailThe Inhibition of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases Induces Differentiation of Supernumerary Hair Cells and Deiters' Cells in the Developing Organ of Corti
Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Knockaert, Marie; Belachew, Shibeshih ULg et al

in FASEB Journal (2003), 17(14), 2136-8

In the embryonic day 19 organs of Corti, we showed that roscovitine, a chemical inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), significantly increased the number of hair cells (HCs) and corresponding ... [more ▼]

In the embryonic day 19 organs of Corti, we showed that roscovitine, a chemical inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), significantly increased the number of hair cells (HCs) and corresponding supporting cells (SCs) by triggering differentiation of precursor cells without interacting with cell proliferation. The effect of roscovitine was mimicked by other CDK1, 2, 5, and 7 inhibitors but not by CDK4/6 and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway antagonists. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that roscovitine-specific intracellular targets, CDK1, 2, 5, and 7, were expressed in the organ of Corti and especially in Hensen's cells. Affinity chromatography studies showed a tight correlation between the protein levels of CDK1/2 and 5 and the rate of roscovitine-induced supernumerary cells in the organ of Corti. In addition, we demonstrated that basal CDK activity was higher and more roscovitine-sensitive at developmental stages that are selectively permissive for the emergence of supernumerary cells. These results suggest that CDKs are involved in the normal development of the organ of Corti and that, at least in E19 embryos, inhibition of CDKs is sufficient to trigger the differentiation of HCs and corresponding SCs, presumably from the Hensen's cell progenitors and/or from progenitors located in the greater epithelial ridge area. [less ▲]

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See detailSubstance P protects spiral ganglion neurons from apoptosis via PKC-Ca2+-MAPK/ERK pathways
Lallemend, François; Lefèbvre, Philippe ULg; Hans, Grégory ULg et al

in Journal of Neurochemistry (2003), 87(2), 508-521

In the current study, we have investigated the ability of substance P (SP) to protect 3-day-old (P3) rat spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) from trophic factor deprivation (TFD)-induced cell death. The ... [more ▼]

In the current study, we have investigated the ability of substance P (SP) to protect 3-day-old (P3) rat spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) from trophic factor deprivation (TFD)-induced cell death. The presence of SP high affinity neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1) transcripts was detected in the spiral ganglion and the NK1 protein localized to SGNs both ex vivo and in vitro. Treatment with SP increased cytoplasmic Ca2+ in SGNs, further arguing for the presence of functional NK1 on these neurons. Both SP and the agonist [Sar(9), Met(O-2)(11)]-SP significantly decreased SGN cell death induced by TFD, with no effect on neurite outgrowth. The survival promoting effect of SP was blocked by the NK1 antagonist, WIN51708. Both pan-caspase inhibitor BOC-D-FMK and SP treatments markedly reduced activation of caspases and DNA fragmentation in trophic factor deprived-neurons. The neuroprotective action of SP was antagonised by specific inhibitors of second messengers, including 1.2-bis-(O-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA-AM) to chelate cytosolic Ca2+, the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors bisindolylmaleimide I, Go6976 and LY333531 and the MAPK/ERK inhibitor U0126. In contrast, nifedipine, a specific inhibitor of L-type Ca2+ channel, and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, had no effect on SP trophic support of SGNs. Moreover, activation of endogenous PKC by 4beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) also reduced the loss of trophic factor-deprived SGNs. Thus, NK1 expressed by SGNs transmit a survival-promoting regulatory signal during TFD-induced SGN cell death via pathways involving PKC activation, Ca2+ signalling and MAPK/ERK activation, which can be accounted for by an inhibition of caspase activation. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases control proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation of oligodendroglial cells
Nguyen, Laurent ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Rocher, Véronique et al

in International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience (2003), 21(6), 321-326

Since cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) and their endogenous inhibitors (Cdkis) play an essential role as regulators of cell cycle withdrawal and onset of differentiation within oligodendroglial cells, we ... [more ▼]

Since cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) and their endogenous inhibitors (Cdkis) play an essential role as regulators of cell cycle withdrawal and onset of differentiation within oligodendroglial cells, we assessed here the effects of exogenous chemical Cdk inhibitors (CKIs) on cultured rat cortical oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). We showed that purine derivatives and especially roscovitine strongly inhibited OPCs proliferation. In the presence of mitogenic signals, roscovitine synergized with thyroid hormone to stimulate oligodendrocyte differentiation. Roscovitine also prevented oligodendroglial apoptosis induced by growth factor deprivation. We thus demonstrated that small molecular weight chemical CKIs have important effects on crucial events of oligodendroglial development in vitro. This might open prospects for using these apparently well tolerated agents in remyelination strategies. (C) 2003 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailUntangling the functional potential of PSA-NCAM-expressing cells in CNS development and brain repair strategies
Nguyen, Laurent ULg; Rigo, Jean-Michel; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg et al

in Current Medicinal Chemistry (2003), 10(20), 2185-2196

Central nervous system (CNS) neural stem cells (NSCs), which are mostly defined by their ability to self-renew and to generate the three main cell lineages of the CNS, were isolated from discrete regions ... [more ▼]

Central nervous system (CNS) neural stem cells (NSCs), which are mostly defined by their ability to self-renew and to generate the three main cell lineages of the CNS, were isolated from discrete regions of the adult mammalian CNS including the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle and the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus. At early stages of CNS cell fate determination, NSCs give rise to progenitors that express the polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM). PSA-NCAM(+) cells persist in adult brain regions where neuronal plasticity and sustained formation of new neurons occur. PSA-NCAM, has been shown to be involved in the regulation of CNS myelination as well as in changes of cell morphology that are necessary for motility, axonal guidance, synapse formation, and functional plasticity in the CNS. Although being preferentially committed to a restricted either glial or neuronal fate, cultured PSA-NCAM(+) progenitors do preserve a relative degree of multipotentiality. Considering that PSA-NCAM(+) cells can be neatly used for brain repair purposes, there is much interest for studying signaling factors regulating their development. With this regard, it is noteworthy that neurotransmitters, which belong to the micro-environment of neural cells in vivo, regulate morphogenetic events preceding synaptogenesis such as cell proliferation, migration, differentiation and death. Consistently, several ionotropic but also G-protein-coupled neurotransmitter receptors were found to be expressed in CNS embryonic and postnatal progenitors. In the present review, we outlined the ins and outs of PSA-NCAM(+) cells addressing to what extent our understanding of extrinsic and in particular neurotransmitter-mediated signaling in these CNS precursor cells might represent a new leading track to develop alternative strategies to stimulate brain repair. [less ▲]

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See detailImage analysis of the axonal ingrowth into poly(D,L-lactide) porous scaffolds in relation to the 3-D porous structure
Blacher, Silvia ULg; Maquet, Véronique; Luyckx, Françoise ULg et al

in Biomaterials (2003), 24(6), 1033-1040

Porous polymer scaffolds are promising materials for neural tissue engineering because they offer valuable three-dimensional (3D) supports for the in vitro and in vivo axonal growth and tissue expansion ... [more ▼]

Porous polymer scaffolds are promising materials for neural tissue engineering because they offer valuable three-dimensional (3D) supports for the in vitro and in vivo axonal growth and tissue expansion. At the time being, how the in vivo neuronal cell development depends on the scaffold 3-D architecture is unknown. Therefore, scanning electron micrographs of longitudinal sections of porous polylactide scaffolds and immunohistological sections of these scaffolds after implantation and neurofilament staining have been studied by image analysis. Pore orientation and axonal ingrowth have been investigated by spectral analysis on gray level SEM images. Binary image processing has been carried out and the binary images have been studied by spectral analysis in order to estimate the possible effect of the image noise on the real pattern. In addition to axonal orientation, density and length distribution of the regenerated axons into the polymer scaffold have been measured. Dependence of the axonal ingrowth on the 3D-polymer scaffold has been discussed on the basis of the collected data. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Alzheimer's disease on the recognition of novel versus familiar words : Neuropsychological and clinico-metabolic data
Lekeu, Françoise ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Degueldre, Christian ULg et al

in Neuropsychology (2003), 17(1), 143-154

This study explored recognition memory performance for novel versus familiar words in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and normal controls (NCs), using an adaptation of E. Tulving and N. Kroll's (1995 ... [more ▼]

This study explored recognition memory performance for novel versus familiar words in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and normal controls (NCs), using an adaptation of E. Tulving and N. Kroll's (1995) procedure. Results showed that both groups exhibited more hits and more false alarms for familiar than for novel words. The groups did not differ in the recognition of familiar words, reflecting preserved familiarity processes in AD. However, AD patients made more false alarms than NCs in the recognition of novel words, reflecting impairment of recollection processes in AD. A positron emission tomography analysis of clinico-metabolic correlations in AD patients showed a correlation between recognition of novel words and right hippocampal activity, whereas recognition of familiar words was more related to metabolic activity in the left posterior orbitofrontal cortex. [less ▲]

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See detailDes statines pour le cerveau?
Sadzot, Bernard ULg; HANS, Grégory ULg; Bottin, P. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2003), 58(10), 621-7

Whether cholesterol lowering decreases risk of stroke has long remained unclear. Large epidemiological studies have found only weak links between cholesterol levels and stroke. Recent studies with statins ... [more ▼]

Whether cholesterol lowering decreases risk of stroke has long remained unclear. Large epidemiological studies have found only weak links between cholesterol levels and stroke. Recent studies with statins, more potent cholesterol lowering agents, have now demonstrated significant reductions of stroke incidence and total mortality when administered for secondary prevention in patients with wide ranges of cholesterol values. It remains unknown if a statin is superior to others for the secondary prevention of stroke. [less ▲]

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See detailAttitudes et controverses dans la prevention secondaire de l'accident ischemique cerebral.
HANS, Grégory ULg; Sadzot, Bernard ULg; Moonen, Gustave ULg

in Revue medicale de Liege (2003), 58(5), 287-92

Stroke is the third leading cause of death and the main cause of prolonged disability of adults in industrialised countries. After a first transient ischemic attack or a first minor stroke, the risk of ... [more ▼]

Stroke is the third leading cause of death and the main cause of prolonged disability of adults in industrialised countries. After a first transient ischemic attack or a first minor stroke, the risk of recurrence is 16 folds higher than in control subjects. Therefore each patient suspect of a first ischemic cerebral event should be evaluated for the presence of a specific cause which could be treated. If such a cause is not found, platelet antiaggregant medications should be started. [less ▲]

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See detailAutocrine/paracrine activation of the GABA(A) receptor inhibits the proliferation of neurogenic polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule-positive (PSA-NCAM+) precursor cells from postnatal striatum.
Nguyen, Laurent ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Breuskin, Ingrid ULg et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2003), 23(8), 3278-94

GABA and its type A receptor (GABA(A)R) are present in the immature CNS and may function as growth-regulatory signals during the development of embryonic neural precursor cells. In the present study, on ... [more ▼]

GABA and its type A receptor (GABA(A)R) are present in the immature CNS and may function as growth-regulatory signals during the development of embryonic neural precursor cells. In the present study, on the basis of their isopycnic properties in a buoyant density gradient, we developed an isolation procedure that allowed us to purify proliferative neural precursor cells from early postnatal rat striatum, which expressed the polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM). These postnatal striatal PSA-NCAM+ cells were shown to proliferate in the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and formed spheres that preferentially generated neurons in vitro. We demonstrated that PSA-NCAM+ neuronal precursors from postnatal striatum expressed GABA(A)R subunits in vitro and in situ. GABA elicited chloride currents in PSA-NCAM+ cells by activation of functional GABA(A)R that displayed a typical pharmacological profile. GABA(A)R activation in PSA-NCAM+ cells triggered a complex intracellular signaling combining a tonic inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade and an increase of intracellular calcium concentration by opening of voltage-gated calcium channels. We observed that the activation of GABA(A)R in PSA-NCAM+ neuronal precursors from postnatal striatum inhibited cell cycle progression both in neurospheres and in organotypic slices. Furthermore, postnatal PSA-NCAM+ striatal cells synthesized and released GABA, thus creating an autocrine/paracrine mechanism that controls their proliferation. We showed that EGF modulated this autocrine/paracrine loop by decreasing GABA production in PSA-NCAM+ cells. This demonstration of GABA synthesis and GABA(A)R function in striatal PSA-NCAM+ cells may shed new light on the understanding of key extrinsic cues that regulate the developmental potential of postnatal neuronal precursors in the CNS. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain correlates of performance in a free/cued recall task with semantic encoding in Alzheimer disease
Lekeu, Françoise ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Chicherio, C. et al

in Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders (2003), 17(1), 35-45

The goal of this study was to explore in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) the brain correlates of free and cued recall performance using an adaptation of the procedure developed by Grober and ... [more ▼]

The goal of this study was to explore in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) the brain correlates of free and cued recall performance using an adaptation of the procedure developed by Grober and Buschke (1987). This procedure, which ensures semantic processing and coordinates encoding and retrieval, has been shown to be very sensitive to an early diagnosis of AD. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM 99) was used to establish clinicometabolic correlations between performance at free and cued verbal recall and resting brain metabolism in 31 patients with AD. Results showed that patient's score on free recall correlated with metabolic activity in right frontal regions (BA 10 and BA 45), suggesting that performance reflected a strategic retrieval attempt. Poor retrieval performance was tentatively attributed to a loss of functional correlation between frontal and medial temporal regions in patients with AD compared with elderly controls. Performance on cued recall was correlated to residual metabolic activity in bilateral parahippocampal regions (BA 36), suggesting that performance reflected retrieval of semantic associations, without recollection in AD. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the diagnostic sensitivity for Alzheimer's disease of the cued recall performance in the Grober and Buschke procedure (1987) depends on the activity of parahippocampal regions, one of the earliest targets of the disease. Moreover, the results suggest that the poor performance of patients with AD during free and cued recall is related to a decreased connectivity between parahippocampal regions and frontal areas. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of neural markers nestin and GFAP expression by cultivated bone marrow stromal cells.
Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg; Moonen, Gustave ULg et al

in Journal of Cell Science (2003), 116(Pt 16), 3295-302

Bone marrow stromal cells can differentiate into many types of mesenchymal cells, i.e. osteocyte, chondrocyte and adipocyte, but can also differentiate into non-mesenchymal cells, i.e. neural cells under ... [more ▼]

Bone marrow stromal cells can differentiate into many types of mesenchymal cells, i.e. osteocyte, chondrocyte and adipocyte, but can also differentiate into non-mesenchymal cells, i.e. neural cells under appropriate in vivo experimental conditions (Kopen et al., 1999; Brazelton et al., 2000; Mezey et al., 2000). This neural phenotypic plasticity allows us to consider the utilization of mesenchymal stem cells as cellular material in regenerative medicine. In this study, we demonstrate that cultured adult rat stromal cells can express nestin, an intermediate filament protein predominantly expressed by neural stem cells. Two factors contribute to the regulation of nestin expression by rat stromal cells: serum in the culture medium inhibits nestin expression and a threshold number of passages must be reached below which nestin expression does not occur. Only nestin-positive rat stromal cells are able to form spheres when they are placed in the culture conditions used for neural stem cells. Likewise, only nestin-positive stromal cells are able to differentiate into GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein)-positive cells when they are co-cultivated with neural stem cells. We thus demonstrated that adult rat stromal cells in culture express nestin in absence of serum after passaging the cells at least ten times, and we suggest that nestin expression by these cells might be a prerequisite for the acquisition of the capacity to progress towards the neural lineage. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain function in the vegetative state
Laureys, Steven ULg; Antoine, S.; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2002), 102(4), 177-185

Positron emission tomography (PET) techniques represent a useful tool to better understand the residual brain function in vegetative state patients. It has been shown that overall cerebral metabolic rates ... [more ▼]

Positron emission tomography (PET) techniques represent a useful tool to better understand the residual brain function in vegetative state patients. It has been shown that overall cerebral metabolic rates for glucose are massively reduced in this condition. However, the recovery of consciousness from vegetative state is not always associated with substantial changes in global metabolism. This finding led us to hypothesize that some vegetative patients are unconscious not just because of a global loss of neuronal function, but rather due to an altered activity in some critical brain regions and to the abolished functional connections between them. We used voxel-based Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) approaches to characterize the functional neuroanatomy of the vegetative state. The most dysfunctional brain regions were bilateral frontal and parieto-temporal associative cortices. Despite the metabolic impairment, external stimulation still induced a significant neuronal activation (i.e., change in blood flow) in vegetative patients as shown by both auditory click stimuli and noxious somatosensory stimuli. However this activation was limited to primary cortices and dissociated from higher-order associative cortices, thought to be necessary for conscious perception. Finally, we demonstrated that vegetative patients have impaired functional connections between distant cortical areas and between the thalami and the cortex and, more importantly, that recovery of consciousness is paralleled by a restoration of this cortico-thalamo-cortical interaction. [less ▲]

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See detailExploring the effect of action familiarity on SPTs recall performance in Alzheimer's disease
Lekeu, Françoise ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Moonen, Gustave ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology (2002), 24(8), 1057-1069

This study examined the performance of normal controls (NC) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients on free recall, semantic cued recall and object cued recall of both subject-performed tasks (SPTs) and ... [more ▼]

This study examined the performance of normal controls (NC) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients on free recall, semantic cued recall and object cued recall of both subject-performed tasks (SPTs) and verbal descriptions of actions, by controlling familiarity of actions associated to objects. The results showed that both groups performed better after SPT encoding than after verbal encoding. in all three types of recall. In addition, this SPT advantage was greater for AD patients than for NC in the object cued recall test, emphasizing AD patients' sensibility to the congruence of cues between encoding and retrieval conditions. Following verbal encoding. NC showed a better recall for less familiar actions than for highly familiar actions, whereas AD patients exhibited the opposite pattern. These results reflect that AD patients did not benefit from a distinctiveness effect at encoding for improving subsequent retrieval of verbal information, probably due to a reduced level of elaboration during encoding. However, there was no effect of action familiarity on recall performance by both groups following SPT encoding. These results suggest that memory for verbal actions and SPTs is governed by different principles. In addition. they demonstrate the robustness of the SPT effect in AD patients, who were able to improve memory performance in the SPT condition not only with highly familiar actions but also with less familiar actions. [less ▲]

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See detailEpithelial supporting cells can differentiate into outer hair cells and Deiters' cells in the cultured organ of Corti
Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Thiry, Marc ULg; Van De Water, Thomas R. et al

in Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS (2002), 59(10), 1744-1757

The organ of Corti is a complex structure containing a single row of inner hair cells (IHCs) and three rows of outer hair cells (OHCs), supported respectively by one row of inner phalangeal cells and ... [more ▼]

The organ of Corti is a complex structure containing a single row of inner hair cells (IHCs) and three rows of outer hair cells (OHCs), supported respectively by one row of inner phalangeal cells and three rows of Deiters' cells. When fetal rat organ of Corti explants are cultured, supernumerary OHCs and supernumerary Deiters' cells are produced, without any additional cell proliferation. Analysis of semi- and ultrathin sections revealed that supernumerary OHCs are produced at the distal edge of the organ of Corti. Quantitative analysis of cell types present in the organ of Corti demonstrates that when the number of OHCs increases: (i) the total number of cells remains constant; (ii) the number of Deiters' cells increases; (iii) the number of tectal cells decreases and of Hensen's cells decreases. Using specific HC markers, i.e. jagged2 (Jag2) and Math1, we showed that in addition to existing OHCs, supernumerary OHCs, tectal cells and Hensen's cells expressed these markers in embryonic day 19 organ of Corti explants after 5 days in vitro. The results of this study suggest that Hensen's cells retain the capacity to differentiate into either tectal cells, which differentiate into OHCs, or into undertectal cells which differentiate into Deiters' cells. [less ▲]

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See detailCortical processing of noxious somatosensory stimuli in the persistent vegetative state
Laureys, Steven ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2002), 17(2), 732-741

The persistent vegetative state (PVS) is a devastating medical condition characterized by preserved wakefulness contrasting with absent voluntary interaction with the environment. We used positron ... [more ▼]

The persistent vegetative state (PVS) is a devastating medical condition characterized by preserved wakefulness contrasting with absent voluntary interaction with the environment. We used positron emission tomography to assess the central processing of noxious somatosensory stimuli in the PVS. Changes in regional cerebral blood flow were measured during high-intensity electrical stimulation of the median nerve compared with rest in 15 nonsedated patients and in 15 healthy controls. Evoked potentials were recorded simultaneously. The stimuli were experienced as highly unpleasant to painful in controls. Brain glucose metabolism was also studied with [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose in resting conditions. In PVS patients, overall cerebral metabolism was 40% of normal values. Nevertheless, noxious somatosensory stimulation-activated midbrain, contralateral thalamus, and primary somatosensory cortex in each and every PVS patient, even in the absence of detectable cortical evoked potentials. Secondary somatosensory, bilateral insular, posterior parietal, and anterior cingulate cortices did not show activation in any patient. Moreover, in PVS patients, the activated primary somatosensory cortex was functionally disconnected from secondary somatosensory, bilateral posterior parietal, premotor, polysensory superior temporal, and prefrontal cortices. In conclusion, somatosensory stimulation of PVS patients, at intensities that elicited pain in controls, resulted in increased neuronal activity in primary somatosensory cortex, even if resting brain metabolism was severely impaired. However, this activation of primary cortex seems to be isolated and dissociated from higher-order associative cortices. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA). [less ▲]

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