References of "Moonen, Gustave"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDiffuse cortical atrophy in a patient with Turner syndrome and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy
Blaise, Pierre ULg; Fumal, Arnaud ULg; Janin, Nicolas ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology (2005), 252(2), 232-233

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailbeta-carbolines induce apoptosis in cultured cerebellar granule neurons via the mitochondrial pathway
Hans, Grégory ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Lallemend, François et al

in Neuropharmacology (2005), 48(1), 105-117

N-Butyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (betaCCB) is, together with 2-methyl-norharmanium and 2,9-dimethylnorharmanium ions, an endogenously occurring beta-carboline. Due to their structural similarities ... [more ▼]

N-Butyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (betaCCB) is, together with 2-methyl-norharmanium and 2,9-dimethylnorharmanium ions, an endogenously occurring beta-carboline. Due to their structural similarities with the synthetic neurotoxin 1-methy14-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), harman and norharman compounds have been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. While also structurally related, betaCCB has received much less interest in that respect although we had previously demonstrated that it induces the apoptotic cell death of cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Herein, we have investigated the molecular events leading to CGN apoptosis upon betaCCB treatment. We first demonstrated that betaCCB-induced apoptosis occurs in neurons only, most likely as a consequence of a specific neuronal uptake as shown using binding/uptake experiments. Then we observed that, in betaCCB-treated CGNs, caspases 9, 3 and 8 were successively activated, suegesing an activation of the mitochondrial pathway. Consistently, betaCCB also induced the release from the mitochondrial intermembrane space of two pro-apoptotic factors. i.e. cytochrome c and apotptosis inducing factor (AIF). Interestingly, no mitochondrial membrane depolarisation was associated with this release. suggesting a mitochondrial permeability transition pore-independent mechanism. The absence of any neuroprotective effect provided by two mPTP inhibitors. i.e. cyclosporine A and bongkrekic acid. further supported this hypothesis. Together. these results show that betaCCB is specifically taken up by neuronal cells where it triggers a specific permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane and a subsequent apoptotic cell death. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMolecular pathways involved in apoptotic cell death in the injured cochlea: Cues to novel therapeutic strategies
Lallemend, François; Lefèbvre, Philippe ULg; Hans, Grégory ULg et al

in Current Pharmaceutical Design (2005), 11(17), 2257-2275

Most hearing loss results from lesions of the sensory cells and/or neurons of the auditory portion of the inner ear. To date, only the cochlear implantation offers long-term hearing-aid benefit, but still ... [more ▼]

Most hearing loss results from lesions of the sensory cells and/or neurons of the auditory portion of the inner ear. To date, only the cochlear implantation offers long-term hearing-aid benefit, but still with limited performance and expensive cost. While the underlying causes of deafness are not clear, the death or hair cells and/or neurons and the loss of neuronal contacts are key pathological features. Pinpointing molecular events that control cell death in the cochlea is critical for the development of new strategies to prevent and treat deafness, whether in combination or not with cochlear implant therapy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeural mechanisms involved in the detection of our first name : A combined ERPs and PET study
Perrin, Fabien; Maquet, Pierre ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Neuropsychologia (2005), 43(1), 12-19

In everyday social interactions, hearing our own first name captures our attention and gives rise to a sense of self-awareness, since it is one of the most socially self related stimulus. In the present ... [more ▼]

In everyday social interactions, hearing our own first name captures our attention and gives rise to a sense of self-awareness, since it is one of the most socially self related stimulus. In the present study, we combined ERPs and PET scan methods to explore the cerebral mechanisms underlying the detection of our own name. While categorical analyses of PET data failed to reveal significant results, we found that the amplitude of the P3 component, elicited when hearing one's own name, correlates with regional cerebral blood changes in right superior temporal sulcus, precuneus and medial prefrontal cortex. Additionally, the latter was more correlated to the P3 obtained for the subject's name compared to that obtained for other first names. These results suggest that the medial prefrontal cortex plays the most prominent role in self-processing. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in severely brain injured patients: Differences between VS and MCS
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (2005), 15(3-4, Jul-Sep), 283-289

We review cerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in minimally conscious state (MCS) and vegetative state (VS) patients. In contrast with limited brain activation found in VS patients, MCS ... [more ▼]

We review cerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in minimally conscious state (MCS) and vegetative state (VS) patients. In contrast with limited brain activation found in VS patients, MCS patients show activation similar to controls in response to auditory, emotional and noxious stimuli. Despite an apparent clinical similarity between MCS and VS patients, functional imaging data show striking differences in cortical segregation and integration between these two conditions. However, in the absence of a generally accepted neural correlate of consciousness as measured by functional neuroirnaging, clinical assessment remains the gold standard for the evaluation and management of severely brain damaged patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPlasticity of cultured mesenchymal stem cells: switch from nestin-positive to excitable neuron-like phenotype.
Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine ULg; Hans, Grégory ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Stem Cells (2005), 23(3), 392-402

Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into several types of mesenchymal cells, including osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes, but, under appropriate experimental conditions, can ... [more ▼]

Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into several types of mesenchymal cells, including osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes, but, under appropriate experimental conditions, can also differentiate into nonmesenchymal cells--for instance, neural cells. These observations have raised interest in the possible use of MSCs in cell therapy strategies for various neurological disorders. In the study reported here, we addressed the question of in vitro differentiation of MSCs into functional neurons. First, we demonstrate that when they are co-cultured with cerebellar granule neurons, adult MSCs can express neuronal markers. Two factors are needed for the emergence of neuronal differentiation of the MSCs: the first one is nestin expression by MSCs (nestin is a marker for the responsive character of MSCs to extrinsic signals), and the second one is a direct cell-cell interaction between neural cells and MSCs that allows the integration of these extrinsic signals. Three different approaches suggest that neural phenotypes arise from MSCs by a differentiation rather than a cell fusion process, although this last phenomenon can also coexist. The expression of several genes--including sox, pax, notch, delta, frizzled, and erbB--was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in order to further characterize the nestin-positive phenotype compared to the nestin-negative one. An overexpression of sox2, sox10, pax6, fzd, erbB2, and erbB4 is found in nestin-positive MSCs. Finally, electrophysiological analyses demonstrate that MSC-derived neuron-like cells can fire single-action potentials and respond to several neurotransmitters such as GABA, glycine, and glutamate. We conclude that nestin-positive MSCs can differentiate in vitro into excitable neuron-like cells. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe locked-in syndrome : what is it like to be conscious but paralyzed and voiceless?
Laureys, Steven ULg; Pellas, Frédéric; Van Eeckhout, Philippe et al

in Progress in Brain Research (2005), 150(Boundaries of Consciousness: Neurobiology and Neuropathology), 495-511

The locked-in syndrome (pseudocoma) describes patients who are awake and conscious but selectively deefferented, i.e., have no means of producing speech, limb or facial movements. Acute ventral pontine ... [more ▼]

The locked-in syndrome (pseudocoma) describes patients who are awake and conscious but selectively deefferented, i.e., have no means of producing speech, limb or facial movements. Acute ventral pontine lesions are its most common cause. People with such brainstem lesions often remain comatose for some days or weeks, needing artificial respiration and then gradually wake up, but remaining paralyzed and voiceless, superficially resembling patients in a vegetative state or akinetic mutism, In acute locked-in syndrome (LIS), eye-coded communication and evaluation of cognitive and emotional functioning is very limited because vigilance is fluctuating and eye movements may be inconsistent, very small, and easily exhausted. It has been shown that more than half of the time it is the family and not the physician who first realized that the patient was aware. Distressingly, recent studies reported that the diagnosis of LIS on average takes over 2.5 months. In some cases it took 4-6 years before aware and sensitive patients, locked in an immobile body, were recognized as being conscious. Once a LIS patient becomes medically stable, and given appropriate medical care, life expectancy increases to several decades. Even if the chances of good motor recovery are very limited, existing eye-controlled, computer-based communication technology currently allow the patient to control his environment, use a word processor coupled to a speech synthesizer, and access the worldwide net. Healthy individuals and medical professionals sometimes assume that the quality of life of an LIS patient is so poor that it is not worth living. On the contrary, chronic LIS patients typically self-report meaningful quality of life and their demand for euthanasia is surprisingly infrequent. Biased clinicians might provide less aggressive medical treatment and influence the family in inappropriate ways. It is important to stress that only the medically stabilized, informed LIS patient is competent to consent to or refuse life-sustaining treatment. Patients suffering from LIS should not be denied the right tot die - and to die with dignity - but also, and more importantly, and pain and symptom management. In our opinion, there is an urgent need for a renewed ethical and medicolegal framework for our care of locked-in patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 132 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailZerebrale Funktionen bei hirngeschädigten Patienten. Was bedeuten Koma, "vegetative state“, "minimally conscious state“, "Locked-in-Syndrom“ und Hirntod?
Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Pantke, Karl-Heinz; Berré, Jacques et al

in Anaesthesist (2004), 53(12), 1195-1202

Comatose, vegetative, minimally conscious or locked-in patients represent a problem in terms of diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and everyday management at the intensive care unit. The evaluation of ... [more ▼]

Comatose, vegetative, minimally conscious or locked-in patients represent a problem in terms of diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and everyday management at the intensive care unit. The evaluation of possible cognitive functions in these patients is difficult because voluntary movements may be very small, inconsistent and easily exhausted. Functional neuroimaging cannot replace the clinical assessment of patients with altered states of consciousness. Nevertheless, it can describe objectively how deviant from normal the cerebral activity is and its regional distribution at rest and under various conditions of stimulation. The quantification of brain activity differentiates patients who sometimes only differ by a brief and incomplete blink of an eye. In the present paper, we will first try to define consciousness as it can be assessed at the patient's bedside. We then review the major clinical entities of altered states of consciousness encountered in the intensive care unit. Finally, we discuss the functional neuroanatomy of these conditions as assessed by positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 128 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCerebral processing in the minimally conscious state
Laureys, Steven ULg; Perrin, Fabien; Faymonville, Marie ULg et al

in Neurology (2004), 63(5), 916-918

We studied a patient in a minimally conscious state using PET and cognitive evoked potentials. Cerebral metabolism was below half of normal values. Auditory stimuli with emotional valence ( infant cries ... [more ▼]

We studied a patient in a minimally conscious state using PET and cognitive evoked potentials. Cerebral metabolism was below half of normal values. Auditory stimuli with emotional valence ( infant cries and the patient's own name) induced a much more widespread activation than did meaningless noise; the activation pattern was comparable with that previously obtained in controls. Cognitive potentials showed preserved P300 responses to the patient's own name. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStriatal PSA-NCAM(+) precursor cells from the newborn rat express functional glycine receptors
Nguyen, Laurent ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Breuskin, Ingrid ULg et al

in Neuroreport (2004), 15(4), 583-587

Immunocytochemical analysis showed that ionotropic glycine receptors are expressed in neurogenic progenitors purified from the newborn rat striatum and expressing the polysialylated form of the neural ... [more ▼]

Immunocytochemical analysis showed that ionotropic glycine receptors are expressed in neurogenic progenitors purified from the newborn rat striatum and expressing the polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule, both in vitro and in situ. To ascertain whether glycine receptors were functional in vitro, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings demonstrated that glycine triggers inward strychnine-sensitive currents in the majority of these cells. Moreover, we found that glycine receptors expressed by these neurogenic progenitors display intermediate electrophysiological characteristics between those of glycine receptors expressed by neural stem cells and by mature interneurons from the rat striatum. Altogether, the present data show that functional strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors are expressed in neurogenic progenitors purified from the newborn rat striatum. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImaging a cognitive model of apraxia: The neural substrate of gesture-specific cognitive processes
Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Garraux, Gaëtan ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2004), 21(3), 119-142

The present study aimed to ascertain the neuroanatomical basis of an influential neuropsychological model for upper limb apraxia [Rothi LJ, et al. The Neuropsychology of Action. 1997. Hove, UK: Psychology ... [more ▼]

The present study aimed to ascertain the neuroanatomical basis of an influential neuropsychological model for upper limb apraxia [Rothi LJ, et al. The Neuropsychology of Action. 1997. Hove, UK: Psychology Press]. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured in healthy volunteers using (H2O)-O-15 PET during performance of four tasks commonly used for testing upper limb apraxia, i.e., pantomime of familiar gestures on verbal command, imitation of familiar gestures, imitation of novel gestures, and an action-semantic task that consisted in matching objects for functional use. We also re-analysed data from a previous PET study in which we investigated the neural basis. of the visual analysis of gestures. First; we found that two sets of discrete brain areas are predominantly engaged in the imitation of familiar and novel gestures, respectively. Segregated brain activation for novel gesture mutation concur with neuropsychological reports to support the hypothesis that knowledge about the organization of the human body mediates the transition from visual perception to motor execution when imitating novel gestures [Goldenberg Neuropsychologia 1995;35.63-72]. Second, conjunction analyses revealed distinctive neural bases for most of the gesture-specific cognitive processes proposed in this cognitive model of upper limb apraxia. However, a functional analysis of brain imaging data suggested that one single memory store may be used for "to be-perceived" and "to-be-produced" gestural representations, departing from Rothi et al.'s proposal. Based on the above considerations, we suggest and discuss a revised model for upper limb apraxia that might best account for both brain imaging findings and neuropsychological dissociations reported in the apraxia literature. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailBrain function in the vegetative state
Laureys, Steven ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; De Tiège, Xavier et al

in Brain Death and Disorders of Consciousness (2004)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAuditory processing in severely brain injured patients: differences between the minimally conscious state and the persistent vegetative state.
Boly, Mélanie ULg; FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Archives of Neurology (2004), 61(2), 233-8

BACKGROUND: The minimally conscious state (MCS) is a recently defined clinical condition; it differs from the persistent vegetative state (PVS) by the presence of inconsistent, but clearly discernible ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The minimally conscious state (MCS) is a recently defined clinical condition; it differs from the persistent vegetative state (PVS) by the presence of inconsistent, but clearly discernible, behavioral evidence of consciousness. OBJECTIVE: To study auditory processing among patients who are in an MCS, patients who are in a PVS, and healthy control subjects. METHODS: By means of (15)O-radiolabeled water-positron emission tomography, we measured changes in regional cerebral blood flow induced by auditory click stimuli in 5 patients in an MCS, 15 patients in a PVS, and 18 healthy controls. RESULTS: In both patients in an MCS and the healthy controls, auditory stimulation activated bilateral superior temporal gyri (Brodmann areas 41, 42, and 22). In patients in a PVS, the activation was restricted to Brodmann areas 41 and 42 bilaterally. We also showed that, compared with patients in a PVS, patients in an MCS demonstrated a stronger functional connectivity between the secondary auditory cortex and temporal and prefrontal association cortices. CONCLUSIONS: Although assumptions about the level of consciousness in severely brain injured patients are difficult to make, our findings suggest that the cerebral activity observed in patients in an MCS is more likely to lead to higher-order integrative processes, thought to be necessary for the gain of conscious auditory perception. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells favour the astroglial lineage in neural progenitors and stem cells by releasing active BMP4.
Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine ULg; Bruyere, Françoise ULg; Hans, Grégory ULg et al

in BMC Neuroscience (2004), 5

BACKGROUND: Spontaneous repair is limited after CNS injury or degeneration because neurogenesis and axonal regrowth rarely occur in the adult brain. As a result, cell transplantation has raised much ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Spontaneous repair is limited after CNS injury or degeneration because neurogenesis and axonal regrowth rarely occur in the adult brain. As a result, cell transplantation has raised much interest as potential treatment for patients with CNS lesions. Several types of cells have been considered as candidates for such cell transplantation and replacement therapies. Foetal brain tissue has already been shown to have significant effects in patients with Parkinson's disease. Clinical use of the foetal brain tissue is, however, limited by ethical and technical problems as it requires high numbers of grafted foetal cells and immunosuppression. Alternatively, several reports suggested that mesenchymal stem cells, isolated from adult bone marrow, are multipotent cells and could be used in autograft approach for replacement therapies. RESULTS: In this study, we addressed the question of the possible influence of mesenchymal stem cells on neural stem cell fate. We have previously reported that adult rat mesenchymal stem cells are able to express nestin in defined culture conditions (in the absence of serum and after 25 cell population doublings) and we report here that nestin-positive (but not nestin-negative) mesenchymal stem cells are able to favour the astroglial lineage in neural progenitors and stem cells cultivated from embryonic striatum. The increase of the number of GFAP-positive cells is associated with a significant decrease of the number of Tuj1- and O4-positive cells. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we demonstrate that mesenchymal stem cells express LIF, CNTF, BMP2 and BMP4 mRNAs, four cytokines known to play a role in astroglial fate decision. In this model, BMP4 is responsible for the astroglial stimulation and oligodendroglial inhibition, as 1) this cytokine is present in a biologically-active form only in nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium and 2) anti-BMP4 antibodies inhibit the nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium inducing effect on astrogliogenesis. CONCLUSIONS: When thinking carefully about mesenchymal stem cells as candidates for cellular therapy in neurological diseases, their effects on resident neural cell fate have to be considered. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailResidual cerebral functioning in the vegetative state
Laureys, Steven ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; De Tiège, X. et al

in Arco di Giano (2004)

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (32 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Inhibition of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases Induces Differentiation of Supernumerary Hair Cells and Deiters' Cells in the Developing Organ of Corti
Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Knockaert, Marie; Belachew, Shibeshih ULg et al

in FASEB Journal (2003), 17(14), 2136-8

In the embryonic day 19 organs of Corti, we showed that roscovitine, a chemical inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), significantly increased the number of hair cells (HCs) and corresponding ... [more ▼]

In the embryonic day 19 organs of Corti, we showed that roscovitine, a chemical inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), significantly increased the number of hair cells (HCs) and corresponding supporting cells (SCs) by triggering differentiation of precursor cells without interacting with cell proliferation. The effect of roscovitine was mimicked by other CDK1, 2, 5, and 7 inhibitors but not by CDK4/6 and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway antagonists. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that roscovitine-specific intracellular targets, CDK1, 2, 5, and 7, were expressed in the organ of Corti and especially in Hensen's cells. Affinity chromatography studies showed a tight correlation between the protein levels of CDK1/2 and 5 and the rate of roscovitine-induced supernumerary cells in the organ of Corti. In addition, we demonstrated that basal CDK activity was higher and more roscovitine-sensitive at developmental stages that are selectively permissive for the emergence of supernumerary cells. These results suggest that CDKs are involved in the normal development of the organ of Corti and that, at least in E19 embryos, inhibition of CDKs is sufficient to trigger the differentiation of HCs and corresponding SCs, presumably from the Hensen's cell progenitors and/or from progenitors located in the greater epithelial ridge area. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSubstance P protects spiral ganglion neurons from apoptosis via PKC-Ca2+-MAPK/ERK pathways
Lallemend, François; Lefèbvre, Philippe ULg; Hans, Grégory ULg et al

in Journal of Neurochemistry (2003), 87(2), 508-521

In the current study, we have investigated the ability of substance P (SP) to protect 3-day-old (P3) rat spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) from trophic factor deprivation (TFD)-induced cell death. The ... [more ▼]

In the current study, we have investigated the ability of substance P (SP) to protect 3-day-old (P3) rat spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) from trophic factor deprivation (TFD)-induced cell death. The presence of SP high affinity neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1) transcripts was detected in the spiral ganglion and the NK1 protein localized to SGNs both ex vivo and in vitro. Treatment with SP increased cytoplasmic Ca2+ in SGNs, further arguing for the presence of functional NK1 on these neurons. Both SP and the agonist [Sar(9), Met(O-2)(11)]-SP significantly decreased SGN cell death induced by TFD, with no effect on neurite outgrowth. The survival promoting effect of SP was blocked by the NK1 antagonist, WIN51708. Both pan-caspase inhibitor BOC-D-FMK and SP treatments markedly reduced activation of caspases and DNA fragmentation in trophic factor deprived-neurons. The neuroprotective action of SP was antagonised by specific inhibitors of second messengers, including 1.2-bis-(O-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA-AM) to chelate cytosolic Ca2+, the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors bisindolylmaleimide I, Go6976 and LY333531 and the MAPK/ERK inhibitor U0126. In contrast, nifedipine, a specific inhibitor of L-type Ca2+ channel, and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, had no effect on SP trophic support of SGNs. Moreover, activation of endogenous PKC by 4beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) also reduced the loss of trophic factor-deprived SGNs. Thus, NK1 expressed by SGNs transmit a survival-promoting regulatory signal during TFD-induced SGN cell death via pathways involving PKC activation, Ca2+ signalling and MAPK/ERK activation, which can be accounted for by an inhibition of caspase activation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChemical inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases control proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation of oligodendroglial cells
Nguyen, Laurent ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Rocher, Véronique et al

in International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience (2003), 21(6), 321-326

Since cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) and their endogenous inhibitors (Cdkis) play an essential role as regulators of cell cycle withdrawal and onset of differentiation within oligodendroglial cells, we ... [more ▼]

Since cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) and their endogenous inhibitors (Cdkis) play an essential role as regulators of cell cycle withdrawal and onset of differentiation within oligodendroglial cells, we assessed here the effects of exogenous chemical Cdk inhibitors (CKIs) on cultured rat cortical oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). We showed that purine derivatives and especially roscovitine strongly inhibited OPCs proliferation. In the presence of mitogenic signals, roscovitine synergized with thyroid hormone to stimulate oligodendrocyte differentiation. Roscovitine also prevented oligodendroglial apoptosis induced by growth factor deprivation. We thus demonstrated that small molecular weight chemical CKIs have important effects on crucial events of oligodendroglial development in vitro. This might open prospects for using these apparently well tolerated agents in remyelination strategies. (C) 2003 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUntangling the functional potential of PSA-NCAM-expressing cells in CNS development and brain repair strategies
Nguyen, Laurent ULg; Rigo, Jean-Michel; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg et al

in Current Medicinal Chemistry (2003), 10(20), 2185-2196

Central nervous system (CNS) neural stem cells (NSCs), which are mostly defined by their ability to self-renew and to generate the three main cell lineages of the CNS, were isolated from discrete regions ... [more ▼]

Central nervous system (CNS) neural stem cells (NSCs), which are mostly defined by their ability to self-renew and to generate the three main cell lineages of the CNS, were isolated from discrete regions of the adult mammalian CNS including the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle and the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus. At early stages of CNS cell fate determination, NSCs give rise to progenitors that express the polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM). PSA-NCAM(+) cells persist in adult brain regions where neuronal plasticity and sustained formation of new neurons occur. PSA-NCAM, has been shown to be involved in the regulation of CNS myelination as well as in changes of cell morphology that are necessary for motility, axonal guidance, synapse formation, and functional plasticity in the CNS. Although being preferentially committed to a restricted either glial or neuronal fate, cultured PSA-NCAM(+) progenitors do preserve a relative degree of multipotentiality. Considering that PSA-NCAM(+) cells can be neatly used for brain repair purposes, there is much interest for studying signaling factors regulating their development. With this regard, it is noteworthy that neurotransmitters, which belong to the micro-environment of neural cells in vivo, regulate morphogenetic events preceding synaptogenesis such as cell proliferation, migration, differentiation and death. Consistently, several ionotropic but also G-protein-coupled neurotransmitter receptors were found to be expressed in CNS embryonic and postnatal progenitors. In the present review, we outlined the ins and outs of PSA-NCAM(+) cells addressing to what extent our understanding of extrinsic and in particular neurotransmitter-mediated signaling in these CNS precursor cells might represent a new leading track to develop alternative strategies to stimulate brain repair. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImage analysis of the axonal ingrowth into poly(D,L-lactide) porous scaffolds in relation to the 3-D porous structure
Blacher, Silvia ULg; Maquet, Véronique; Luyckx, Françoise ULg et al

in Biomaterials (2003), 24(6), 1033-1040

Porous polymer scaffolds are promising materials for neural tissue engineering because they offer valuable three-dimensional (3D) supports for the in vitro and in vivo axonal growth and tissue expansion ... [more ▼]

Porous polymer scaffolds are promising materials for neural tissue engineering because they offer valuable three-dimensional (3D) supports for the in vitro and in vivo axonal growth and tissue expansion. At the time being, how the in vivo neuronal cell development depends on the scaffold 3-D architecture is unknown. Therefore, scanning electron micrographs of longitudinal sections of porous polylactide scaffolds and immunohistological sections of these scaffolds after implantation and neurofilament staining have been studied by image analysis. Pore orientation and axonal ingrowth have been investigated by spectral analysis on gray level SEM images. Binary image processing has been carried out and the binary images have been studied by spectral analysis in order to estimate the possible effect of the image noise on the real pattern. In addition to axonal orientation, density and length distribution of the regenerated axons into the polymer scaffold have been measured. Dependence of the axonal ingrowth on the 3D-polymer scaffold has been discussed on the basis of the collected data. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (4 ULg)