References of "Moonen, Gustave"
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See detailComment prédire l'évolution du coma post-anoxique?
Kirsch, Murielle ULg; Boveroux, Pierre ULg; Massion, Paul ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63(5-6), 263-268

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See detailMetabolic correlates of clinical heterogeneity in questionable Alzheimer’s disease
Salmon, Eric ULg; Lekeu, Françoise ULg; Garraux, Gaëtan ULg et al

in Neurobiology of Aging (2008), 29

Thirty-four subjects with questionable Alzheimer's disease (QAD) were included in a 3-year prospective study and underwent neuropsychological testing and measurement of brain metabolism using FDG-PET at ... [more ▼]

Thirty-four subjects with questionable Alzheimer's disease (QAD) were included in a 3-year prospective study and underwent neuropsychological testing and measurement of brain metabolism using FDG-PET at entry. Seventeen patients (50%) did not convert to AD during the follow-up period. Compared to elderly controls of similar age, the cerebral activity of non-converters was reduced in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Moreover, the variability of metabolism in the posterior cingulate cortex was related to their visuospatial memory performance, while disparity in parietal activity was related to their verbal memory performance. These results demonstrate the cerebral metabolic heterogeneity of patients with QAD. Initial functional images of converters showed that activity was already impaired in the posterior cingulate, lateral temporal cortex, anterior cingulate and orbitofrontal cortex. This metabolic pattern is consistent with a pre-dementia stage of AD, and highlights the fact that significant frontal metabolic involvement may be associated with impaired activity in posterior associative cortices in very early AD. [less ▲]

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See detailEditorial. Le cerveau dans tous ses états.
Moonen, Gustave ULg; Ansseau, Marc ULg; Scheen, André ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63

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See detailSpontaneous neural activity during human slow wave sleep.
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, Manuel ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2008), 105(39), 15160-5

Slow wave sleep (SWS) is associated with spontaneous brain oscillations that are thought to participate in sleep homeostasis and to support the processing of information related to the experiences of the ... [more ▼]

Slow wave sleep (SWS) is associated with spontaneous brain oscillations that are thought to participate in sleep homeostasis and to support the processing of information related to the experiences of the previous awake period. At the cellular level, during SWS, a slow oscillation (<1 Hz) synchronizes firing patterns in large neuronal populations and is reflected on electroencephalography (EEG) recordings as large-amplitude, low-frequency waves. By using simultaneous EEG and event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we characterized the transient changes in brain activity consistently associated with slow waves (>140 microV) and delta waves (75-140 microV) during SWS in 14 non-sleep-deprived normal human volunteers. Significant increases in activity were associated with these waves in several cortical areas, including the inferior frontal, medial prefrontal, precuneus, and posterior cingulate areas. Compared with baseline activity, slow waves are associated with significant activity in the parahippocampal gyrus, cerebellum, and brainstem, whereas delta waves are related to frontal responses. No decrease in activity was observed. This study demonstrates that SWS is not a state of brain quiescence, but rather is an active state during which brain activity is consistently synchronized to the slow oscillation in specific cerebral regions. The partial overlap between the response pattern related to SWS waves and the waking default mode network is consistent with the fascinating hypothesis that brain responses synchronized by the slow oscillation restore microwake-like activity patterns that facilitate neuronal interactions. [less ▲]

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See detailMesurer la douleur chez le patient non communicant.
Chatelle, Camille ULg; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Mergam, Anne-Nora ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63(5-6), 429-37

Pain is a subjective experience. Its assessment is based on the subject's direct verbal report. This method of assessment is, however, impossible in patients who cannot communicate their feelings. In this ... [more ▼]

Pain is a subjective experience. Its assessment is based on the subject's direct verbal report. This method of assessment is, however, impossible in patients who cannot communicate their feelings. In this context, indirect measurements such as behavioral observations or physiological measurements are needed. To facilitate the assessment of pain in non-communicative patients, numerous standardized behavioral scales have been developed. The aim of this review is to discuss the main validated pain scales employed in end-stage dementia, newborn and preverbal children, and severely brain damaged patients with a disorder of consciousness such as coma, the vegetative state or the minimally conscious state. [less ▲]

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See detailQue mesure la neuro-imagerie fonctionnelle: IRMf, TEP & MEG?
Gosseries, Olivia ULg; Demertzi, Athina ULg; Noirhomme, Quentin ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63(5-6), 231-7

Functional cerebral imaging techniques allow the in vivo study of human cognitive and sensorimotor functions in physiological or pathological conditions. In this paper, we review the advantages and ... [more ▼]

Functional cerebral imaging techniques allow the in vivo study of human cognitive and sensorimotor functions in physiological or pathological conditions. In this paper, we review the advantages and limitations of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetoencephalography (MEG). fMRI and PET measure haemodynamic changes induced by regional changes in neuronal activity. These techniques have a high spatial resolution (a few millimeters), but a poor temporal resolution (a few seconds to several minutes). Electroencephalogram (EEG) and MEG measure the neuronal electrical or magnetic activity with a high temporal resolution (i.e., milliseconds) albeit with a poorer spatial resolution (i.e., a few millimeters to one centimeter). The combination of these different neuroimaging techniques allows studying different components of the brain's activity (e.g., neurovascular coupling, electromagnetic activity) with both a high temporal and spatial resolution. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring the effect of amantadine in chronic anoxic minimally conscious state.
Schnakers, Caroline ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Vandewalle, Gilles ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (2008), 79(2), 225-7

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See detailBlink to visual threat does not herald consciousness in the vegetative state.
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Giacino, J.; Schnakers, Caroline ULg et al

in Neurology (2008), 71(17), 1374-5

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See detailQuelle vie apres le Locked-In syndrome?
Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Pellas, F.; Bernheim, J. L. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63(5-6), 445-51

The Locked-In Syndrome (LIS) is classically caused by an anterior pontine vascular lesion and characterized by quadriplegia and anarthria with preserved consciousness and intellectual functioning. We here ... [more ▼]

The Locked-In Syndrome (LIS) is classically caused by an anterior pontine vascular lesion and characterized by quadriplegia and anarthria with preserved consciousness and intellectual functioning. We here review the definition, etiologies, diagnosis and prognosis of LIS patients and briefly discuss the few studies on their quality of life and the challenging end-of-life decisions that can be encountered. Some clinicians may consider that LIS is worse than being in a vegetative or in a minimally conscious state. However, preliminary data from chronic LIS survivors show a surprisingly preserved self-scored quality of life and requests of treatment withdrawal or euthanasia, though not absent, are infrequent. [less ▲]

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See detailA french validation study of the Coma Recovery Scaled-Revised (CRS-R)
Schnakers, Caroline ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg; Giacino, Joseph et al

in Brain Injury (2008), 22(10), 786-792

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See detailLes échelles d’évaluation des états de conscience altérée
Ledoux, Didier ULg; Piret, Sonia ULg; Boveroux, Pierre ULg et al

in Réanimation (2008), 17

L’évaluation de l’état de conscience revêt une importance clinique considé- rable. En effet, déterminer avec précision la sévérité de l’altération de conscience permet non seulement d’établir un pronostic ... [more ▼]

L’évaluation de l’état de conscience revêt une importance clinique considé- rable. En effet, déterminer avec précision la sévérité de l’altération de conscience permet non seulement d’établir un pronostic vital et fonctionnel mais aussi de suivre plus efficacement l’évolution clinique des patients avec lésion cérébrale et d’optimaliser l’utilisation des ressources disponibles. Dans cet article, nous passons en revue les principales échelles d’évaluation des états de conscience altérée. Nous nous intéressons particu- lièrement à instrument récemment publié, l’échelle «Full Outline of UnResponsiveness» (FOUR). En effet, cette dernière constitue une avancée considérable dans l’évaluation cli- nique des patients présentant un état de conscience altérée. Parmi les apports de cette échelle, on notera sa contribution au diagnostic d’un locked-in syndrome, d’un état de conscience minimale ou encore d’un état de mort cérébrale. Nous pensons qu’en rai- son de son apport à l’examen clinique durant la phase initiale d’un état de conscience altérée, l’échelle FOUR devrait être préférée à la désormais classique échelle de Glasgow. [less ▲]

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See detailCdk2 Is Dispensable for Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis
Vandenbosch, Renaud ULg; Borgs, Laurence ULg; Beukelaers, Pierre ULg et al

in Cell Cycle (Georgetown, Tex.) (2007), 6(24), 3065-9

Granule neurons of the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus undergo continuous renewal throughout life. Among cell cycle regulators, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) is considered as a major regulator of ... [more ▼]

Granule neurons of the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus undergo continuous renewal throughout life. Among cell cycle regulators, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) is considered as a major regulator of S-phase entry. We used Cdk2-deficient mice to decipher the requirement of Cdk2 for the generation of new neurons in the adult hippocampus. The quantification of cell cycle markers first revealed that the lack of Cdk2 activity does not influence spontaneous or seizure-induced proliferation of neural progenitor cells (NPC) in the adult DG. Using bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays, we showed that the number of mature newborn granule neurons generated de novo was similar in both wild-type (WT) and Cdk2-deficient adult mice. Moreover, the apparent lack of cell output reduction in Cdk2(-/-) mice DG did not result from a reduction in apoptosis of newborn granule cells as analyzed by TUNEL assays. Our results therefore suggest that Cdk2 is dispensable for NPC proliferation, differentiation and survival of adult-born DG granule neurons in vivo. These data emphasize that functional redundancies between Cdks also occur in the adult brain at the level of neural progenitor cell cycle regulation during hippocampal neurogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailNew insights into peripherin expression in cochlear neurons
Lallemend, François; Vandenbosch, Renaud ULg; Hadjab, S. et al

in Neuroscience (2007), 150(1), 212-222

Peripherin is an intermediate filament protein that is expressed in peripheral and enteric neurons. In the cochlear nervous system, peripherin expression has been extensively used as a differentiation ... [more ▼]

Peripherin is an intermediate filament protein that is expressed in peripheral and enteric neurons. In the cochlear nervous system, peripherin expression has been extensively used as a differentiation marker by preferentially labeling the type II neuronal population at adulthood, but yet without knowing its function. Since the expression of peripherin has been associated in time with the process of axonal extension and during regeneration of nerve fibers in other systems, it was of interest to determine whether peripherin expression in cochlear neurons was a static phenotypic trait or rather prone to modifications following nerve injury. In the present study, we first compared the expression pattern of peripherin and beta III-tubulin from late embryonic stages to the adult in rat cochlea. The staining for both proteins was seen before birth within all cochlear neurons. By birth, and for 2 or 3 days, peripherin expression was gradually restricted to the type II neuronal population and their projections. In contrast, from postnatal day (P) 10 onwards, while the expression of beta III-tubulin was still found in projections of all cochlear neurons, only the type I population had beta III-tubulin immunoreactivity in their cell bodies. We next investigated the expression of peripherin in axotomized cochlear neurons using an organotypic explant model. Peripherin expression was surprisingly re-expressed in a vast majority of neurons after axotomy. In parallel, the expression and localization of beta III-tubulin and peripherin in dissociated cultures of cochlear neurons were studied. Both proteins were distributed along the entire neuronal length but exhibited complementary distribution, especially within the projections. Moreover, peripherin immunoreactivity was still abundant in the growth cone, whereas that of beta III-tubulin was decreasing at this compartment. Our findings are consistent with a model in which peripherin plays an important structural role in cochlear neurons and their projections during both development and regenerative processes and which is compatible with the assumption that frequently developmentally regulated factors are reactivated during neuronal regeneration. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurotransmitters regulate cell migration in the telencephalon
Heng, J. I. T.; Moonen, Gustave ULg; Nguyen, Laurent ULg

in European Journal of Neuroscience (2007), 26(3), 537-546

The complex cytoarchitectonic organization of the adult mammalian telencephalon reflects the elaborate patterns of cell migration that contribute to its generation. The migration by neurons in the CNS can ... [more ▼]

The complex cytoarchitectonic organization of the adult mammalian telencephalon reflects the elaborate patterns of cell migration that contribute to its generation. The migration by neurons in the CNS can broadly be divided into two categories: radial and tangential. Experimental observations in the telencephalon have shown that glutamatergic projection neurons are born in the progenitor compartment of the dorsal telencephalon and migrate radially to integrate the cortical plate, whereas most gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons are generated in the ganglionic eminences and navigate through multiple tangential paths to settle into distinct telencephalic structures. Despite progress towards the understanding of the genetic determinants that specify the fate of neuronal progenitors, much remains unknown about the mechanisms that direct their migration into specific regions of the telencephalon. Interestingly, besides their function in synaptic transmission, neurotransmitters have been shown to promote several developmental processes that contribute to the establishment and maintenance of the CNS. In this respect, recent studies have highlighted a role for neurotransmitters through activation of their receptors in regulating cell migration in the telencephalon. This review summarizes and discusses the growing body of literature implicating neurotransmitters and their cognate receptors as part of a complex molecular machinery that regulate the migration of immature neurons in the telencephalon during development and in adulthood. [less ▲]

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See detailBaseline brain activity fluctuations predict somatosensory perception in humans
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Schnakers, Caroline ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2007), 104(29), 12187-12192

In perceptual experiments, within-individual fluctuations in perception are observed across multiple presentations of the same stimuli, a phenomenon that remains only partially understood. Here, by means ... [more ▼]

In perceptual experiments, within-individual fluctuations in perception are observed across multiple presentations of the same stimuli, a phenomenon that remains only partially understood. Here, by means of thulium-yttrium/aluminum- garnet laser and event-related functional MRI, we tested whether variability in perception of identical stimuli relates to differences in prestimulus, baseline brain activity. Results indicate a positive relationship between conscious perception of low-intensity somatosensory stimuli and immediately preceding levels of baseline activity in medial thalamus and the lateral frontoparietal network, respectively, which are thought to relate to vigilance and "external monitoring." Conversely, there was a negative correlation between subsequent reporting of conscious perception and baseline activity in a set of regions encompassing posterior cingulate/ precuneus and temporoparietal cortices, possibly relating to introspection and self-oriented processes. At nociceptive levels of stimulation, pain-intensity ratings positively correlated with baseline fluctuations in anterior cingulate cortex in an area known to be involved in the affective dimension of pain. These results suggest that baseline brain-activity fluctuations may profoundly modify our conscious perception of the external world. [less ▲]

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See detailWhen thoughts become action: An fMRI paradigm to study volitional brain activity in non-communicative brain injured patients
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Coleman, M. R.; Davis, M. H. et al

in NeuroImage (2007), 36(3), 979-992

The assessment of voluntary behavior in non-communicative brain injured patients is often challenging due to the existence of profound motor impairment. In the absence of a full understanding of the ... [more ▼]

The assessment of voluntary behavior in non-communicative brain injured patients is often challenging due to the existence of profound motor impairment. In the absence of a full understanding of the neural correlates of consciousness, even a normal activation in response to passive sensory stimulation cannot be considered as proof of the presence of awareness in these patients. In contrast, predicted activation in response to the instruction to perform a mental imagery task would provide evidence of voluntary task-dependent brain activity, and hence of consciousness, in non-communicative patients. However, no data yet exist to indicate which imagery instructions would yield reliable single subject activation. The aim of the present study was to establish such a paradigm in healthy volunteers. Two exploratory experiments evaluated the reproducibility of individual brain activation elicited by four distinct mental imagery tasks. The two most robust mental imagery tasks were found to be spatial navigation and motor imagery. In a third experiment, where these two tasks were directly compared, differentiation of each task from one another and from rest periods was assessed blindly using a priori criteria and was correct for every volunteer. The spatial navigation and motor imagery tasks described here permit the identification of volitional brain activation at the single subject level, without a motor response. Volunteer as well as patient data [Owen, A. M., Coleman, M.R., Boly, M., Davis, M.H., Laureys, S., Pickard J.D., 2006. Detecting awareness in the vegetative state. Science 313, 1402] strongly suggest that this' paradigm may provide a method for assessing the presence of volitional brain activity, and thus of consciousness, in non-communicative brain-injured patients. (c) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of dementia severity and age on posterior cingulate cortex metabolism in Alzheimer's disease
Withofs, Nadia ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg; Hallet, Claude ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology (2007, May), 254(Suppl. 3), 146

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See detailVoxel-based analysis of posterior cingulated cortex metabolism in Alzheimer’s disease : effect of dementia severity and age.
WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; SALMON, Eric ULg; LAUREYS, Steven ULg et al

in PROCEEDINGS OF XIIIth SYMPOSIUM OF THE BELGIAN SOCIETY OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE (2007, May)

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