References of "Merville, Marie-Paule"
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See detailCharacterization of the regulatory functions of varicella-zoster virus open reading frame-4 gene-product
Defechereux, Patricia; Melen-Lamalle, Laurence ULiege; Baudoux, Laurence et al

in Journal of Virology (1993), 67(7), 4379-4385

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) open reading frame 4 (ORF4) encodes a protein with a predicted molecular weight of 51,540 presenting amino acid sequence homology with the immediate-early regulatory protein ... [more ▼]

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) open reading frame 4 (ORF4) encodes a protein with a predicted molecular weight of 51,540 presenting amino acid sequence homology with the immediate-early regulatory protein ICP27 of herpes simplex virus type 1. To investigate the regulatory properties of the ORF4 gene product, we performed a series of transient expression assays in Vero cells, using a plasmid expressing ORF4 as effector and several VZV genes and heterologous genes as targets. The VZV target plasmids contained promoter/regulatory regions from genes belonging to the three putative VZV kinetic classes fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. The heterologous target plasmids consisted of promoter/regulatory regions of human cytomegalovirus, Rous sarcoma virus, and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 fused to the reporter gene. These experiments demonstrated that the ORF4 gene product activated expression of ORF62 in a dose-dependent fashion but had no effect on the expression of the three other putative immediate-early genes (ORF4, ORF61, and ORF63). When various amounts of ORF4 were transfected in the presence of early gene promoters, dose-dependent transactivation was evidenced with the thymidine kinase gene (ORF36) and the major DNA-binding protein gene (ORF29) promoters; interestingly, little activity was detected with the promoter of the DNA polymerase gene (ORF28). No activation of late gene expression, represented by the glycoprotein I and glycoprotein II genes, was seen even over a wide range of concentrations of input ORF4 plasmid. Expression of pCMVCAT, pRSVCAT, and pHIVCAT was also stimulated by the ORF4 gene product. CAT mRNA analysis showed that activation of VZV target promoters occurs at the transcriptional and/or posttranscriptional level. [less ▲]

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See detailStimulation of the 92-Kd Type Iv Collagenase Promoter and Enzyme Expression in Human Melanoma Cells
Lauricella-Lefebvre, M. A.; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULiege; Sato, H. et al

in Invasion & Metastasis (1993), 13(6), 289-300

The 92-kD type IV collagenase is a member of the metalloproteinase family which degrades type IV collagen, a major component of basement membrane and is involved in tumor invasion and metastasis. The ... [more ▼]

The 92-kD type IV collagenase is a member of the metalloproteinase family which degrades type IV collagen, a major component of basement membrane and is involved in tumor invasion and metastasis. The promoter and adjacent regulatory sequences of the 92-kD type IV collagenase have been identified previously and three cis-acting elements homologous to the binding sites for AP-1, NF-KB and SP-1 proteins contributed to induction of the promoter activity by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) in HT1080 cells. To date, no direct correlation between promoter activity and expression of the 92-kD type IV collagenase has been reported in normal or cancer cells. In this study, the effects of the transcriptional stimulation of the 92-kD type IV collagenase gene on the expression of the enzyme in human A2058 melanoma cells was analyzed by zymography experiments. Quantitative immunoblots using a monoclonal antibody that recognized specifically and exclusively the 92-kD type IV collagenase, confirmed that the 92-kD gelatinase was 92-kD type IV collagenase. Stimulation of the promoter activity resulted in increased gelatinase activity in the culture medium of A2058 cells. A direct correlation between TPA- and TNF-alpha-mediated promoter stimulation of the 92-kD type IV collagenase gene and its expression was also demonstrated in the human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. Interleukin-1 alpha failed to induce 92-kD gene promoter activity and type IV collagenase expression in melanoma and fibrosarcoma cell lines. Our data demonstrated that TPA- and TNF-alpha-induced 92-kD type IV collagenase promoter stimulation leads to a proportional increase of enzyme expression and secretion and thus could contribute to the activation of the invasive phenotype. [less ▲]

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See detailVaricella-zoster gene 63 encoded protein is an important regulatory factor
Jackers, Pascale ULiege; Defechereux, Patricia; Baudoux, Laurence et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie, de Biochimie et de Biophysique (1992, February 22), 100

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See detailMolecular characterization of varicella-zoster virus gene expression
Defechereux, Patricia; Baudoux, Laurence; Jackers, Pascale ULiege et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie, de Biochimie et de Biophysique (1992, February 22), 100

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See detailLa régulation de l'expression des gènes du virus de la varicelle et du zona
Piette, Jacques ULiege; Defechereux, Patricia; Baudoux, Laurence et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (1992), 136(8), 627-635

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) belongs to the alphaherpesvirus family and shares many important structural and functional similarities with other members of the family such as herpes simplex virus type 1 ... [more ▼]

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) belongs to the alphaherpesvirus family and shares many important structural and functional similarities with other members of the family such as herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). VZV is responsible for two different clinical syndromes, varicella which is the result of the primary infection and zoster which is due to virus reactivation remaining latent in the peripheral nervous system. VZV DNA is 124,884 base pair long and encodes four regulatory proteins (IE4, IE61, IE62 and IE63). Using transient expression systems, we have shown that IE4, IE62 and IE63 can regulate the expression of an indicator gene driven by various VZV promoter regions, demonstrating that these proteins play important roles in the infectious cycle. [less ▲]

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See detailAntibodies to varicella-zoster virus modulate antigen distribution but fail to induce viral persistence in vitro.
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULiege; Marc, Philippe; Lebon, Linda et al

in Journal of Virology (1992), 66(12), 7499-504

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) persists in human sensory ganglia. One of the hypotheses to explain the induction or the maintenance of VZV latency is that it could be promoted by the immune response itself ... [more ▼]

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) persists in human sensory ganglia. One of the hypotheses to explain the induction or the maintenance of VZV latency is that it could be promoted by the immune response itself. It is known that in the case of viruses which bud off the infected cell membrane, virus-specific antibodies can induce antigenic modulation, i.e., spatial redistribution of viral antigens and modulation of their synthesis. To determine whether antigenic modulation occurs during VZV infection in vitro and could possibly be involved in viral persistence, we have grown infected cells in the presence of anti-VZV antibodies either transiently or permanently. The distribution of immune complexes and viral proteins was then analyzed. In transient immunomodulation experiments, the distribution of one or more viral antigens was modified not only in the cytoplasmic membranes but also in the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm of infected cells. When infected cells were kept permanently in the presence of antibodies, the same pattern of redistribution of immune complexes was observed and the localization of internal viral glycoproteins was significantly modified. However, antibodies did not prevent the lytic effect of infection; they altered neither the infectious virus yield nor the Western immunoblot pattern of viral proteins, suggesting that immunomodulation is not the primary effector of viral persistence. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of regulatory functions of the varicella-zoster virus gene-63-encoded protein
Jackers, Pascale ULiege; Defechereux, Patricia; Baudoux, Laurence et al

in Journal of Virology (1992), 66(6), 3899-3903

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) gene 63 encodes a protein (IE63) with a predicted molecular mass of 30.5 kDa which has amino acid similarities to the immediate-early (IE) protein 22 (ICP22) of herpes simplex ... [more ▼]

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) gene 63 encodes a protein (IE63) with a predicted molecular mass of 30.5 kDa which has amino acid similarities to the immediate-early (IE) protein 22 (ICP22) of herpes simplex virus type 1. ICP22 is a polypeptide synthesized in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected cells, and as is the case for its VZV counterpart, its regulatory functions are unknown. On the basis of the VZV DNA sequence, it has been shown that IE63 exhibits hydrophilic and acidic properties, suggesting that this protein could play a regulatory role during the infectious cycle. We report in this article cotransfection experiments which demonstrate that the VZV gene 63 protein strongly represses, in a dose-dependent manner, the expression of VZV gene 62. On the other hand, transient expression of the VZV gene 63 protein can promote activation of the thymidine kinase gene but cannot affect the expression of the genes encoding glycoproteins I and II. The results of transient expression experiments strongly suggest that the VZV gene 63 protein could play a pivotal role in the repression of IE gene expression as well as in the activation of early gene expression [less ▲]

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See detailAn in vivo model of varicella-zoster virus latent infection of dorsal root ganglia
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULiege; Merville, Marie-Paule ULiege; Delrée, P. et al

in Journal of Neuroscience Research (1990), 26(1), 83-89

We describe here the first in vivo model of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) latent infection in the adult rat peripheral nervous system. Infected Mewo cells were injected subcutaneously along the spine of ... [more ▼]

We describe here the first in vivo model of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) latent infection in the adult rat peripheral nervous system. Infected Mewo cells were injected subcutaneously along the spine of healthy adult rats. No clinical sign of infection was observed even 9 months after inoculation. Humoral immune response to VZV was detected in all infected animals throughout the study (9 months). The presence of viral material in dissociated and cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) from inoculated animals was studied by immunoperoxidase and in situ hybridization. When DRGs from infected animals were plated in culture from 1 month and up to 9 months after inoculation, viral nucleic acids and proteins were detected in neurons. Furthermore, trypsinization and subcultivation of infected neurons in culture is needed to reactivate infectious virus at least in some of the neurons. This model provides a useful tool for studying 1) the molecular mechanisms leading to an in vivo latency, 2) the role of the immune system, in particular cellular immunity, on the establishment, maintenance, and reactivation of latency, 3) the neurotropism of mutant viruses, and 4) the effects of antiviral agents. [less ▲]

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See detailAcute and persistent varicella-zoster virus infection of human and murine neuroblastoma cell lines
Bourdon-Wouters, C.; Merville, Marie-Paule ULiege; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULiege et al

in Journal of Neuroscience Research (1990), 26(1), 90-97

Human and murine neuroblastoma cell lines were infected in vitro with varicella-zoster virus (VZV). Infected human neuroblastoma cells (IMR-32) supported the synthesis of abundant viral antigens as ... [more ▼]

Human and murine neuroblastoma cell lines were infected in vitro with varicella-zoster virus (VZV). Infected human neuroblastoma cells (IMR-32) supported the synthesis of abundant viral antigens as detected by indirect immunoperoxidase labeling using human serum rich in anti-VZV antibodies and did not survive the infection. In situ hybridization (ISH) with VZV-cloned probes revealed a strong hybridization signal in these infected cells. During cultivation, the virus was released in the culture medium, and viral polypeptides were revealed by Western blotting of infected cells, using either a monoclonal anti-gpI antibody or a rabbit antiserum. All these findings indicate that IMR-32 cells support a productive and lytic infection by VZV, whether infected by cell-free virus or by cocultivation with infected cells. Murine neuroblastoma cells (neuro-2A) survived VZV infection and did not produce any infectious virus. No VZV-specific proteins were detected in infected cells either by immunolabeling or by Western blotting. However, viral nucleic acids could be detected by ISH, indicating that mouse neuroblastoma cells displayed a nonproductive, nonlytic infection. Infected neuro-2A cells have been examined by ISH using probes corresponding to immediate early (IE) genes 4, 62, and 63 and late (L) gene 31 encoding gpII. A strong hybridization signal was detected when infected cells were probed with a fragment containing the IE genes 62 and 63. Lower levels of hybridization were detected with the other probes, corresponding to IE or L genes. These systems allow comparative molecular analysis of persistent and acute infection of nerve cells by VZV. [less ▲]

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See detailLatent infection in vivo by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in the rat nervous system
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULiege; Merville, Marie-Paule ULiege; Delrée, P. et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1989), 97

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See detailAntibodies to varicella-zoster virus modulate antigen distribution in cultured infected cells
Marc, Ph.; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULiege; Merville, Marie-Paule ULiege et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1989), 97

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See detailPersistent varicella-zoster virus infection in the nervous system: in vitro and in vivo models
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULiege; Merville, Marie-Paule ULiege; Bourdon-Wouters, C. et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (1988), 88

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See detailIn vitro neuroblastoma cell infection by varicella-zoster virus
Bourdon-Wouters, C.; Merville, Marie-Paule ULiege; Piette, Jacques ULiege et al

Poster (1988)

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See detailIn vitro and in vivo models of varicella-zoster virus persistence in the nervous system
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULiege; Merville, Marie-Paule ULiege; Bourdon-Wouters, C. et al

in Journal of Cellular Biochemistry (1988), 12C

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See detailDetection of cytomegalovirus with labeled DNA probes
Bourdon-Wouters, C.; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULiege; Merville, Marie-Paule ULiege et al

Poster (1987)

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See detailMolecular cloning of varicella-zoster virus DNA and its detection in situ in infected nerve cells
Merville, Marie-Paule ULiege; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULiege; Delrée, P. et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1987), 95(2), 31

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