References of "Melin, Pierrette"
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See detailAntimicrobial Susceptibilities of recent clinical isolates of group B streptococci agalactiae from Belgium
MELIN, Pierrette ULg; Maquet, Julie; Rodriguez Cuns, Grisel et al

in American Society of Microbiology (Ed.) Program and Abstracts of the 43rd Intersciences Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (2003, September)

Background: : GBS cause severe infections in neonates, pregnant women and other adults. Empiric therapy is usually started before susceptibility results are available. Early neonatal diseases can be ... [more ▼]

Background: : GBS cause severe infections in neonates, pregnant women and other adults. Empiric therapy is usually started before susceptibility results are available. Early neonatal diseases can be prevented with intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis based on accurate susceptibility surveillance data. A previous Belgian study showed an increase of 3 to 10 % R to erythromycin (EM) through the 1990s. Methods: 187 GBS isolates consecutively received at the reference laboratory between 2001 to March 2003 were from 73 neonates (52 early-onset and 21 late-onset diseases), 52 adults and 62 from pregnant women’s vagina. MICs of penicillin (PG), EM, clindamycin (CM) and gentamicin (GM) were determined with Etest. PG MBCs were also determined by inactivating the drug in MIC plates using betalactamase. EM resistant (R) isolates were tested by the CM + EM double disk to determine macrolide R phenotypes. Results: All strains were susceptible (S) to PG and no tolerance was observed with MBCs falling within 2 dilutions of MICs. 19.2% of isolates were R to EM, with significantly more R isolates from adults (30.8%; p <0.01) and serotype V (46.8%; p <0,001). 80% had the MLSB phenotype (R to EM and CM), 16 were constitutive and 12 inducible. The M phenotype (R to EM and S to CM) was seen in 7 (20%) of isolates. Less than 10% of isolates were inhibited by GM MIC of <=64 mg/L, 83.6% by 128-256 mg/L and 2.9% by >/=512 mg/L. Non typable strains were more R to GM (p <0.01). Conclusions: 1) PG remained active against all isolates and no tolerance was seen. 2) Prevalence of R to macrolides had increased since 1999, particularly in adult isolates and serotype V. 3) Intermediate to high level R to GM was seen and potential synergy of PG + GM should be investigated. 4) R surveillance is mandatory to guide prophylaxis and treatment of serious GBS infections. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevention of Perinatal Group B Streptococcal Infections - Guidelines from the Belgian Health Council, 2003 (SHC.7721)
Working party of experts, Superior Health Concil; Dubois, J. J.; MELIN, Pierrette ULg et al

Book published by Superior Health Council (2003)

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See detailPrévention des Infections Périnatales à Streptocoquues du groupe B - Recommandations du Conseil Supérieur d'Hygiène, N° 7721
Groupe de travail d'experts, Conseil Supérieur de la Santé; Dubois, J. J.; MELIN, Pierrette ULg et al

Book published by Conseil Supérieur d'Hygiène (2003)

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See detailInfection néonatale tardive à streptocoques B
MELIN, Pierrette ULg

in Ministère de la Communauté Française, Direction générale de la Santé (Ed.) Stratégies de contrôle de maladies transmissibles (2003)

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See detailInfection néonatale précoce à Streptocoques B
MELIN, Pierrette ULg

in Ministère de la Communauté Française, Direction Générale de la Santé (Ed.) Stratégies de contrôle de maladies transmissibles (2003)

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See detailContrôle de qualité interne et assurance de qualité en bactériologie
MELIN, Pierrette ULg

Scientific conference (2003, May)

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See detailInfections et grossesse
MELIN, Pierrette ULg

Conference (2003, April 04)

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See detailLa problématique de la résistance des pneumocoques aux antibiotiques
Marchal, Valérie; Melin, Pierrette ULg; Hayette, Marie-Pierre ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2003), 58(11), 675-680

Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia and it is also a common cause of sinusitis, otitis media, bacteremia and meningitis. The increasing resistance to ... [more ▼]

Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia and it is also a common cause of sinusitis, otitis media, bacteremia and meningitis. The increasing resistance to antimicrobial agents, now endemic in many countries, reflects an uncontrolled use of antibiotics. A good antibiotics policy and vaccination are at the moment the only way to control efficaciously the increasing antibiotic resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae [less ▲]

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See detailPerinatal Group B Streptococcal Disease Prevention, Interactive session
Melin, Pierrette ULg

Conference (2002, November 23)

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See detailProceeds from the European workshop: GBS neonatal disease prevention
MELIN, Pierrette ULg

in de la Rosa, Manuel (Ed.) Proceedings from the European workshop: GBS neonatal disease prevention (2002)

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See detailTowards a Belgian Consensus for prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal disease
MELIN, Pierrette ULg; Verschraegen, G.; Mahieu, Ludo et al

Conference (2002, October)

Background & objectives: In Belgium, as in many other countries, group B Streptococcus (GBS) is still the leading cause of sepsis and meningitis in neonates. In 2001, though no Belgian guidelines for ... [more ▼]

Background & objectives: In Belgium, as in many other countries, group B Streptococcus (GBS) is still the leading cause of sepsis and meningitis in neonates. In 2001, though no Belgian guidelines for their prevention were available, in some hospitals, obstetrical programmes included a GBS prevention policy. With an aim to reach a Belgian consensus for the prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal disease, a national consensum meeting was organized in 2001. We report here our experience and findings of this meeting. Methods: In November 2001, obstetricians, neonatologists, microbiologists and infectious diseases specialists were invited to participate in a GBS symposium. International and Belgian speakers presented epidemiological aspects, argued comparative cost-effectiveness of different approaches for prevention and debated technical and practical problems. Management of neonates with risk factors for GBS disease and progress in GBS vaccines were also included in the programme. Further results about Belgian obstetricians’ practice and compliance to a policy for prevention of neonatal GBS diseases, as answered in two mail surveys, were commented and discussed. In an interactive session at the end, each participant was asked to vote on the key points related to the different steps of the ideal prevention strategy to recommend. Results: For the main questions, 94 per cent of participants choose a screening-based approach and 94 per cent shifted from the current use of ampicillin to penicillin as first choice for antimicrobial prophylaxis. Further, 79 per cent voted for an approach with integrated neonatal prophylaxis for selected neonates at high risk for GBS disease and 47 per cent voted for a strategy based on an intrapartum rapid screening-based approach. Interpretation & conclusion: The state of the question by different speakers, the data from Belgian epidemiology, and the debate about cost-effectiveness of different approaches led to a massive vote in favour of the universal screening-based approach. Based on these results, a working group has been appointed by the Ministry of Health to draft and edit Belgian recommendations for the prevention of perinatal GBS disease. [less ▲]

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See detailSerotype Distribution of clinical isolates of group B streptococci Isolated in Belgium : isolates from neonatal infection compared to isolates from infection in adult or colonization in pregnant women
MELIN, Pierrette ULg; Keke, D.; Campo, B. et al

in American Society of Microbiology (Ed.) Program and Abstracts of the 43rd Intersciences Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (2002, September)

Background: Group B Streptococci cause invasive disease in neonates, pregnant women and non-pregnant adults. In the last decades capsular serotypes (type) Ia, Ib, II and III caused the majority of ... [more ▼]

Background: Group B Streptococci cause invasive disease in neonates, pregnant women and non-pregnant adults. In the last decades capsular serotypes (type) Ia, Ib, II and III caused the majority of clinical diseases. More recently, in North America, type V emerged as the more common type in non-pregnant adults with invasive disease. Methods: From January 1999 through December 2001, we received and typed a total of 334 clinically significant strains of GBS isolated in the laboratories belonging to the Belgian network for epidemiological surveillance. 113 were recovered from neonates blood or cerebrospinal fluid (92 early onset EOD, 21 late onset LOD), 14 were isolated from pregnant women with severe infections and 204 were recovered from adults with invasive disease. From the same laboratories, during the first trimester of 2002, 302 isolates from pregnant women were also typed (max. 5 isolates /lab.) Results: In neonatal EOD type III was the more common (41,3%) followed by II (19.6%), Ia (16.3%), Ib (13%), V (8.7%) and IV (1.1%), whereas type III caused the majority (85.7%) of LOD cases. In adults, all types were well represented except type IV: 20.3% Ia, 12.7% Ib, 13.1% II, 23.1% III, 2.7% IV, 19% V and 9% remained non typeable (NT). In colonized pregnant women, all types were also well represented except type IV: 25.5% Ia, 13.3% Ib, 14.9% II, 17.7% III, 5% IV, 15.5% V and 8.1% remained NT. Type III was more frequently the cause of EOD than a colonizing strain during pregnancy and in contrast NT isolates did not cause EOD (P<0.001) Conclusions: 1) Type III was still the major type in neonatal infections in Belgium. 2) Type distribution of GBS differed by age-group of patients 3) Type V belonged to the 3 more represented types in adults 4) Compared to colonizing GBS in pregnant women, distribution of types causing EOD was different. [less ▲]

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See detailBiological warfare and terrorism, the dark side of microbiology
Melin, Pierrette ULg

Scientific conference (2002, September)

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See detailThe Flesh-Eating Bacteria
Melin, Pierrette ULg

Scientific conference (2002, September)

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See detailIn Vitro Susceptibility Testing of Aspergillus fumigatus against Posaconazole: Comparison of NCCLS M38-P and E-Test Methods
Hayette, Marie-Pierre ULg; Amadore, Agatha; Seidel, Laurence ULg et al

Poster (2002, September)

Posaconazole is a second-generation triazole and structural analogue of itraconazole. This drug has fungicidal activity against yeasts and filamentous fungi. The aim of our study was to evaluate E-test ... [more ▼]

Posaconazole is a second-generation triazole and structural analogue of itraconazole. This drug has fungicidal activity against yeasts and filamentous fungi. The aim of our study was to evaluate E-test method for in vitro susceptibility testing of Aspergillus fumigatus isolates against posaconazole. METHODS: A total of 121 isolates of A. fumigatus were selected as follows: 106 clinical strains from colonized patients, 18 from patients with invasive aspergillosis and 7 environmental isolates. Their in vitro susceptibility was evaluated by E-test (Abbiodisk, Sweden) and compared with NCCLS microdilution reference method (M38-P). Both tests were performed with RPMI 1640 medium at 35 degrees C. MIC values were read after 24h (MIC-24h) and 48h (MIC-48h) incubation time by E-test method. Two MIC endpoints were determined by NCCLS method: 1.no visible reduction of growth (MIC-0); 2. 50% reduction (or more) of growth (MIC-2). Three A. fumigatus reference strains (IHEM 5734, 6149 and 13935) were included as control. RESULTS: Geometric mean MICs (microg/ml) were respectively 0.02 for E-test at 24h and 0.029 at 48h. MIC-0 and MIC-2 values were respectively 0.19 and 0.018 microg/ml. One correlation between both methods was observed for MICs-24h and MICs-2s (p<.05). However, there was no significant difference according to origin of isolates (p<.05). CONCLUSIONS: 1. This study assessed the potent role of posaconazole against A. fumigatus isolates with very low MICs. 2. MIC values were not predictive of pathogenicity. 3. E-test method by reading after 24h-incubation time could easily replace the time-consuming NCCLS M38-P reference method. [less ▲]

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See detailInfections et grossesse
MELIN, Pierrette ULg

Conference (2002, March 16)

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See detailGroup B Streptococcal Infections in Belgium
Melin, Pierrette ULg

Conference (2002, March 13)

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