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See detailCharacterization of the hot Neptune GJ 436 b with Spitzer and ground-based observations
Demory, B*-O; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Barman, T. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2007), 475

We present Spitzer Space Telescope infrared photometry of a secondary eclipse of the hot Neptune GJ 436 b. The observations were obtained using the 8-mum band of the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC). The data ... [more ▼]

We present Spitzer Space Telescope infrared photometry of a secondary eclipse of the hot Neptune GJ 436 b. The observations were obtained using the 8-mum band of the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC). The data spanning the predicted time of secondary eclipse show a clear flux decrement with the expected shape and duration. The observed eclipse depth of 0.58 mmag allows us to estimate a blackbody brightness temperature of T[SUB]p[/SUB] = 717 ± 35 K at 8 mum. We compare this infrared flux measurement to a model of the planetary thermal emission, and show that this model reproduces properly the observed flux decrement. The timing of the secondary eclipse confirms the non-zero orbital eccentricity of the planet, while also increasing its precision (e = 0.14 ± 0.01). Additional new spectroscopic and photometric observations allow us to estimate the rotational period of the star and to assess the potential presence of another planet. Our final secondary eclipse, photometric and Ca II H+K index time series are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/475/1125 [less ▲]

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See detailAccurate Spitzer infrared radius measurement for the hot Neptune GJ 436b
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Demory, B*-O; Barman, T. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2007), 471

We present Spitzer Space Telescope infrared photometry of a primary transit of the hot Neptune GJ 436b. The observations were obtained using the 8 mum band of the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC). The high ... [more ▼]

We present Spitzer Space Telescope infrared photometry of a primary transit of the hot Neptune GJ 436b. The observations were obtained using the 8 mum band of the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC). The high accuracy of the transit data and the weak limb-darkening in the 8 mum IRAC band allow us to derive (assuming M = 0.44 ± 0.04 M_o for the primary) a precise value for the planetary radius (4.19[SUP]+0.21[/SUP][SUB]-0.16[/SUB] R_â ), the stellar radius (0.463[SUP]+0.022[/SUP][SUB]-0.017[/SUB] R_o), the orbital inclination (85.90°[SUP]+0.19°[/SUP][SUB]-0.18°[/SUB]) and transit timing (2454280.78186[SUP]+0.00015[/SUP][SUB]-0.00008[/SUB] HJD). Assuming current planet models, an internal structure similar to that of Neptune with a small H/He envelope is necessary to account for the measured radius of GJ 436b. The photometric data are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/471/L51 [less ▲]

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See detailDetection of transits of the nearby hot Neptune GJ 436 b
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Pont, F.; Demory, B*-O et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2007), 472

This Letter reports on the photometric detection of transits of the Neptune-mass planet orbiting the nearby M-dwarf star GJ 436. It is by far the closest, smallest, and least massive transiting planet ... [more ▼]

This Letter reports on the photometric detection of transits of the Neptune-mass planet orbiting the nearby M-dwarf star GJ 436. It is by far the closest, smallest, and least massive transiting planet detected so far. Its mass is slightly larger than Neptune's at M = 22.6 ± 1.9 M_â . The shape and depth of the transit lightcurves show that it is crossing the host star disc near its limb (impact parameter 0.84 ± 0.03) and that the planet size is comparable to that of Uranus and Neptune, R = 25 200 ± 2200 km = 3.95 ± 0.35 R_â . Its main constituant is therefore very likely to be water ice. If the current planet structure models are correct, an outer layer of H/He constituting up to ten percent in mass is probably needed on top of the ice to account for the observed radius. [less ▲]

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See detailThe "666" collaboration on OGLE transits. I. Accurate radius of the planets OGLE-TR-10b and OGLE-TR-56b with VLT deconvolution photometry
Pont, F.; Moutou, C.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2007), 465

Transiting planets are essential to study the structure and evolution of extra-solar planets. For that purpose, it is important to measure precisely the radius of these planets. Here we report new high ... [more ▼]

Transiting planets are essential to study the structure and evolution of extra-solar planets. For that purpose, it is important to measure precisely the radius of these planets. Here we report new high-accuracy photometry of the transits of OGLE-TR-10 and OGLE-TR-56 with VLT/FORS1. One transit of each object was covered in Bessel V and R filters, and treated with the deconvolution-based photometry algorithm DECPHOT, to ensure accurate millimagnitude light curves. Together with earlier spectroscopic measurements, the data imply a radius of 1.22{[SUP]+0.12[/SUP][SUB]-0.07[/SUB]} R[SUB]J[/SUB] for OGLE-TR-10b and 1.30 ± 0.05 R[SUB]J[/SUB] for OGLE-TR-56b. A re-analysis of the original OGLE photometry resolves an earlier discrepancy about the radius of OGLE-TR-10. The transit of OGLE-TR-56 is almost grazing, so that small systematics in the photometry can cause large changes in the derived radius. Our study confirms both planets as inflated hot Jupiters, with large radii comparable to that of HD 209458b and at least two other recently discovered transiting gas giants. Based on data collected with the FORS1 imager at the VLT-Kueyen telescope (Paranal Observatory, ESO, Chile) in the programme 177.C-0666E. [less ▲]

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