References of "Maquet, Pierre"
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See detailDistinct regions of the medial prefrontal cortex are associated with self-referential processing and perspective taking
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Ruby, Perinne; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2007), 19(6), 935-944

The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) appears to play a prominent role in two fundamental aspects of social cognition, that is, self-referential processing and perspective taking. However, it is currently ... [more ▼]

The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) appears to play a prominent role in two fundamental aspects of social cognition, that is, self-referential processing and perspective taking. However, it is currently unclear whether the same or different regions of the MPFC mediate these two interdependent processes. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study sought to clarify the issue by manipulating both dimensions in a factorial design. Participants judged the extent to which trait adjectives described their own personality (e.g., 'Are you sociable?') or the personality of a close friend (e.g., 'Is Caroline sociable?') and were also asked to put themselves in the place of their friend (i.e., to take a third-person perspective) and estimate how this person would judge the adjectives, with the target of the judgments again being either the self (e.g., 'According to Caroline, are you sociable?') or the other person (e.g., 'According to Caroline, is she sociable?'). We found that self-referential processing (i.e., judgments targeting the self vs. the other person) yielded activation in the ventral and dorsal anterior MPFC, whereas perspective taking (i.e., adopting the other person's perspective, rather than one's own, when making judgments) resulted in activation in the posterior dorsal MPFC; the interaction between the two dimensions yielded activation in the left dorsal MPFC. These findings show that self-referential processing and perspective taking recruit distinct regions of the MPFC and suggest that the left dorsal MPFC may be involved in decoupling one's own from other people's perspectives on the self. [less ▲]

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See detailActive brain processes during human quiescent sleep: an EEG/fMRI study of non-REM slow oscillations
Dang-Vu, T.; Schabus, M.; Desseilles, Martin ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology (2007, May), 254(Suppl. 3), 50

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See detailfMRI study of hypnosis-induced analgesia
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Schnakers, Caroline ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology (2007, May), 254(Suppl. 3), 38-39

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See detailShort-term memory and the left intraparietal sulcus: Focus of attention? Further evidence from a face short-term memory paradigm
Majerus, Steve ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Poncelet, Martine ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2007), 35(1), 353-367

This study explored the validity of an attentional account for the involvement of the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS) in visual STM tasks. This account considers that during STM tasks, the IPS acts as an ... [more ▼]

This study explored the validity of an attentional account for the involvement of the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS) in visual STM tasks. This account considers that during STM tasks, the IPS acts as an attentional modulator, maintaining activation in long-term memory networks that underlie the initial perception and processing of the specific information to be retained. In a recognition STM paradigm, we presented sequences of unfamiliar faces and instructed the participants to remember different types of information: either the identity of the faces or their order of presentation. We hypothesized that, if the left IPS acts as an attentional modulator, it should be active in both conditions, but connected to different neural networks specialized in serial order or face identity processing. Our results showed that the left IPS was activated during both order and identity encoding conditions, but for different reasons. During order encoding, the left IPS showed functional connectivity with order processing areas in the right IPS, bilateral premotor and cerebellar cortices, reproducing earlier results obtained in a verbal STM experiment. During identity encoding, the left IPS showed preferential functional connectivity with right temporal, inferior parietal and medial frontal areas involved in detailed face processing. These results not only support an attentional account of left IPS involvement in visual STM, but given their similarity with previous results obtained for a verbal STM task, they further highlight the importance of the left IPS as an attentional modulator in a variety of STM tasks. [less ▲]

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See detailAn in computo investigation of the Landau-Kleffner syndrome.
Bonjean, Maxime ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg et al

in Conference proceedings : ... Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Conference (2007), 2007

We describe a computational model of the thalamus and the cortex able to reproduce some essential epileptiform features commonly observed in the Landau-Kleffner syndrome. Investigation with this realistic ... [more ▼]

We describe a computational model of the thalamus and the cortex able to reproduce some essential epileptiform features commonly observed in the Landau-Kleffner syndrome. Investigation with this realistic model leads us to the formulation of a cellular mechanism that could be responsible for the epileptic discharges occuring with this severe syndrome. Understanding this mechanism is of prime importance for developing new therapeutical strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of attention on emotional face processing in depression : a functional MRI study
Desseilles, Martin; Maquet, Pierre ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailFASST - fMRI Artefact rejection and Sleep Scoring Toolbox
Phillips, Christophe ULg; Schrouff, Jessica ULg; Coppieters, Dorothée ULg et al

Software (2007)

"FASST" stands for "fMRI Artefact rejection and Sleep Scoring Toolbox". This M/EEG toolbox is developed by researchers from the Cyclotron Research Centre, University of Li ege, Belgium, with the financial ... [more ▼]

"FASST" stands for "fMRI Artefact rejection and Sleep Scoring Toolbox". This M/EEG toolbox is developed by researchers from the Cyclotron Research Centre, University of Li ege, Belgium, with the financial support of the Fonds de la Recherche Scienti que-FNRS, the Queen Elizabeth's funding, and the University of Li ege. On Dr. Pierre Maquet's impulse we started writing these tools to analyze our sleep EEG-fMRI data and tackle four crucial issues: * Continuous M/EEG. Long multi-channel recording of M/EEG data can be enormous. These data are cumbersome to handle as it usually involves displaying, exploring, comparing, chunking, appending data sets, etc. * EEG-fMRI. When recording EEG and fMRI data simultaneously, the EEG signal acquired contains, on top of the usual neural and ocular activity, artefacts induced by the gradient switching and high static eld of an MR scanner. The rejection of theses artefacts is not easy especially when dealing with brain spontaneous activity. * Scoring M/EEG. Reviewing and scoring continuous M/EEG recordings, such as is common with sleep recordings, is a tedious task as the scorer has to manually browse through the entire data set and give a \score" to each time-window displayed. * Waves detection. Continuous and triggerless recordings of M/EEG data show specifi c wave patterns, characteristic of the subject's state (e.g., sleep spindles or slow waves). Their automatic detection is thus important to assess those states. [less ▲]

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See detailWavelength-dependent modulation of brain responses to a working memory task by daytime light exposure
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Gais, S.; Schabus, Manuel ULg et al

in Cerebral Cortex (2007), 17(12), 2788-2795

In addition to classical visual effects, light elicits nonvisual brain responses, which profoundly influence physiology and behavior. These effects are mediated in part by melanopsin-expressing light ... [more ▼]

In addition to classical visual effects, light elicits nonvisual brain responses, which profoundly influence physiology and behavior. These effects are mediated in part by melanopsin-expressing light-sensitive ganglion cells that, in contrast to the classical photopic system that is maximally sensitive to green light (550 nm), is very sensitive to blue light (470-480 nm). At present, there is no evidence that blue light exposure is effective in modulating nonvisual brain activity related to complex cognitive tasks. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that, while participants perform an auditory working memory task, a short (18 min) daytime exposure to blue (470 nm) or green (550 nm) monochromatic light (3 x 10(13) photons/cm(2)/s) differentially modulates regional brain responses. Blue light typically enhanced brain responses or at least prevented the decline otherwise observed following green light exposure in frontal and parietal cortices implicated in working memory, and in the thalamus involved in the modulation of cognition by arousal. Our results imply that monochromatic light can affect cognitive functions almost instantaneously and suggest that these effects are mediated by a melanopsin-based photoreceptor system. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep deprivation on the post-encoding night modifies the neural correlates of retrieval of emotional memories 6 months later
Sterpenich, Virginie ULg; Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Darsaud, Annabelle et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2007), 27(Suppl. 1),

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See detailThe Role of Sleep in Motor Memory Consolidation assessed by fMRI and MEG
Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Sterpenich, Virginie ULg; Darsaud, Annabelle et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2007), 27(Suppl. 1),

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See detailEvaluation comportementale et par neuroimagerie fonctionnelle des patients en état végétatif
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Schnakers, Caroline ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2007), 62 Spec No

Currently, there remains a high rate of misdiagnosis of the vegetative state. This should incite clinicians to use the most sensitive "coma scales" to detect signs of consciousness in these patients. The ... [more ▼]

Currently, there remains a high rate of misdiagnosis of the vegetative state. This should incite clinicians to use the most sensitive "coma scales" to detect signs of consciousness in these patients. The gold standard remains the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, Teasdale and Jennet, 1974), with the Glasgow Liege Scale (GLS, Born, 1988) adding standardized assessment of brainstem reflexes. New sensible behavioral assessment tools for use in the acute neurocritical care setting include the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR, Wijdicks et al., 2005). The Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R, Giacino and Kalmar, 2004) specifically tests the diagnostic criteria differentiating vegetative from minimally conscious patients. Detecting signs of consciousness also depends on the employed methodology. We showed that for the assesment of the presence of visual pursuit, using a moving mirror is better suited than using a moving object or person. The clinical diagnosis can be confirmed by cerebral positron emission tomography studies objectively quantifying residual metabolic activity in vegetative and minimally conscious patients. Ongoing studies evaluate the prognostic value of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in these challenging patient populations. [less ▲]

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See detailTherapeutic use of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in stroke.
Hotermans, Christophe; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Moonen, Gustave ULg et al

in Stroke (2007), 38(2), 253254

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See detailSleep transforms the cerebral trace of declarative memories
Gais, Steffen; Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2007), 104(47), 18778-18783

After encoding, memory traces are initially fragile and have to be reinforced to become permanent. The initial steps of this process occur at a cellular level within minutes or hours. Besides this rapid ... [more ▼]

After encoding, memory traces are initially fragile and have to be reinforced to become permanent. The initial steps of this process occur at a cellular level within minutes or hours. Besides this rapid synaptic consolidation, systems consolidation occurs within a time frame of days to years. For declarative memory, the latter is presumed to rely on an interaction between different brain regions, in particular the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Specifically, sleep has been proposed to provide a setting that supports such systems consolidation processes, leading to a transfer and perhaps transformation of memories. Using functional MRI, we show that postlearning sleep enhances hippocampal responses during recall of word pairs 48 h after learning, indicating intrahippocampal memory processing during sleep. At the same time, sleep induces a memory-related functional connectivity between the hippocampus and the mPFC. Six months after learning, memories activated the mPFC more strongly when they were encoded before sleep, showing that sleep leads to long-lasting changes in the representation of memories on a systems level. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuroimaging of REM sleep and dreaming
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, Manuel; Desseilles, Martin ULg et al

in McNamara, Patrick; Barrett, Deirdre (Eds.) The New Science of Dreaming (2007)

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See detailTherapeutic armamentarium in neurology: the birth of a new era
Belachew, Shibeshih ULg; Magis, Delphine ULg; Lievens, Isabelle ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2007), 62(5-6), 432-448

The field of neurology was long infamous for a lack of therapeutic options. How many of you have once thought: "Neurologists don't cure the disease, they admire it". But those days have passed into ... [more ▼]

The field of neurology was long infamous for a lack of therapeutic options. How many of you have once thought: "Neurologists don't cure the disease, they admire it". But those days have passed into history, and the field is now vibrant with new treatments and hope even for patients with the worst neurodegenerative diseases. We summarized in the present review the latest major advances in therapeutic principles and practice for some of the most frequent chronic neurological disorders such as headaches, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, dementias, Parkinson's disease, sleep/wake disturbances and peripheral neuropathies. We cannot cure or prevent, but we can now halt or control symptoms and disease progression to provide physical and psychological relief, and a better quality of life for patients who suffer from these otherwise devastating neurological conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain responses to violet, blue, and green monochromatic light exposures in humans: prominent role of blue light and the brainstem
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Schmidt, Christina ULg; Albouy, Geneviève ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2007), 2(11), 1247

BACKGROUND: Relatively long duration retinal light exposure elicits nonvisual responses in humans, including modulation of alertness and cognition. These responses are thought to be mediated in part by ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Relatively long duration retinal light exposure elicits nonvisual responses in humans, including modulation of alertness and cognition. These responses are thought to be mediated in part by melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells which are more sensitive to blue light than violet or green light. The contribution of the melanopsin system and the brain mechanisms involved in the establishment of such responses to light remain to be established. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We exposed 15 participants to short duration (50 s) monochromatic violet (430 nm), blue (473 nm), and green (527 nm) light exposures of equal photon flux (10(13)ph/cm(2)/s) while they were performing a working memory task in fMRI. At light onset, blue light, as compared to green light, increased activity in the left hippocampus, left thalamus, and right amygdala. During the task, blue light, as compared to violet light, increased activity in the left middle frontal gyrus, left thalamus and a bilateral area of the brainstem consistent with activation of the locus coeruleus. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results support a prominent contribution of melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells to brain responses to light within the very first seconds of an exposure. The results also demonstrate the implication of the brainstem in mediating these responses in humans and speak for a broad involvement of light in the regulation of brain function. [less ▲]

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See detailHemodynamic cerebral correlates of sleep spindles during human non-rapid eye movement sleep.
Schabus, Manuel ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Albouy, Geneviève ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2007), 104(32), 13164-9

In humans, some evidence suggests that there are two different types of spindles during sleep, which differ by their scalp topography and possibly some aspects of their regulation. To test for the ... [more ▼]

In humans, some evidence suggests that there are two different types of spindles during sleep, which differ by their scalp topography and possibly some aspects of their regulation. To test for the existence of two different spindle types, we characterized the activity associated with slow (11-13 Hz) and fast (13-15 Hz) spindles, identified as discrete events during non-rapid eye movement sleep, in non-sleep-deprived human volunteers, using simultaneous electroencephalography and functional MRI. An activation pattern common to both spindle types involved the thalami, paralimbic areas (anterior cingulate and insular cortices), and superior temporal gyri. No thalamic difference was detected in the direct comparison between slow and fast spindles although some thalamic areas were preferentially activated in relation to either spindle type. Beyond the common activation pattern, the increases in cortical activity differed significantly between the two spindle types. Slow spindles were associated with increased activity in the superior frontal gyrus. In contrast, fast spindles recruited a set of cortical regions involved in sensorimotor processing, as well as the mesial frontal cortex and hippocampus. The recruitment of partially segregated cortical networks for slow and fast spindles further supports the existence of two spindle types during human non-rapid eye movement sleep, with potentially different functional significance. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep-related hippocampo-cortical interplay during emotional memory recollection.
Sterpenich, Virginie ULg; Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

in PLoS Biology (2007), 5(11), 282

Emotional events are usually better remembered than neutral ones. This effect is mediated in part by a modulation of the hippocampus by the amygdala. Sleep plays a role in the consolidation of declarative ... [more ▼]

Emotional events are usually better remembered than neutral ones. This effect is mediated in part by a modulation of the hippocampus by the amygdala. Sleep plays a role in the consolidation of declarative memory. We examined the impact of sleep and lack of sleep on the consolidation of emotional (negative and positive) memories at the macroscopic systems level. Using functional MRI (fMRI), we compared the neural correlates of successful recollection by humans of emotional and neutral stimuli, 72 h after encoding, with or without total sleep deprivation during the first post-encoding night. In contrast to recollection of neutral and positive stimuli, which was deteriorated by sleep deprivation, similar recollection levels were achieved for negative stimuli in both groups. Successful recollection of emotional stimuli elicited larger responses in the hippocampus and various cortical areas, including the medial prefrontal cortex, in the sleep group than in the sleep deprived group. This effect was consistent across subjects for negative items but depended linearly on individual memory performance for positive items. In addition, the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex were functionally more connected during recollection of either negative or positive than neutral items, and more so in sleeping than in sleep-deprived subjects. In the sleep-deprived group, recollection of negative items elicited larger responses in the amygdala and an occipital area than in the sleep group. In contrast, no such difference in brain responses between groups was associated with recollection of positive stimuli. The results suggest that the emotional significance of memories influences their sleep-dependent systems-level consolidation. The recruitment of hippocampo-neocortical networks during recollection is enhanced after sleep and is hindered by sleep deprivation. After sleep deprivation, recollection of negative, potentially dangerous, memories recruits an alternate amygdalo-cortical network, which would keep track of emotional information despite sleep deprivation. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuroimaging in sleep medicine.
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Petit, Dominique ULg et al

in Sleep Medicine (2007), 8(4), 349-72

The development of neuroimaging techniques has made possible the characterization of cerebral function throughout the sleep-wake cycle in normal human subjects. Indeed, human brain activity during sleep ... [more ▼]

The development of neuroimaging techniques has made possible the characterization of cerebral function throughout the sleep-wake cycle in normal human subjects. Indeed, human brain activity during sleep is segregated within specific cortical and subcortical areas in relation to the sleep stage, sleep physiological events and previous waking activity. This approach has allowed sleep physiological theories developed from animal data to be confirmed, but has also introduced original concepts about the neurobiological mechanisms of sleep, dreams and memory in humans. In contrast, at present, few neuroimaging studies have been dedicated to human sleep disorders. The available work has brought interesting data that describe some aspects of the pathophysiology and neural consequences of disorders such as insomnia, sleep apnea and narcolepsy. However, the interpretation of many of these results is restricted by limited sample size and spatial/temporal resolution of the employed technique. The use of neuroimaging in sleep medicine is actually restrained by concerns resulting from the technical experimental settings and the characteristics of the diseases. Nevertheless, we predict that future studies, conducted with state of the art techniques on larger numbers of patients, will be able to address these issues and contribute significantly to the understanding of the neural basis of sleep pathologies. This may finally offer the opportunity to use neuroimaging, in addition to the clinical and electrophysiological assessments, as a helpful tool in the diagnosis, classification, treatment and monitoring of sleep disorders in humans. [less ▲]

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See detailHere I am: the cortical correlates of visual self-recognition.
Devue, Christel ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in Brain Research (2007), 1143

Recently, interest in the neural correlates of self-recognition has grown. Most studies concentrate on self-face recognition. However, there is a lack of convergence as to precise neuroanatomical ... [more ▼]

Recently, interest in the neural correlates of self-recognition has grown. Most studies concentrate on self-face recognition. However, there is a lack of convergence as to precise neuroanatomical locations underlying self-face recognition. In addition, recognition of familiar persons from bodies has been relatively neglected. In the present study, cerebral activity while participants performed a task in which they had to indicate the real appearance of themselves and of a gender-matched close colleague among intact and altered pictures of faces and bodies was measured. The right frontal cortex and the insula were found to be the main regions specifically implicated in visual self-recognition compared with visual processing of other highly familiar persons. Moreover, the right anterior insula along with the right anterior cingulate seemed to play a role in the integration of information about oneself independently of the stimulus domain. The processing of self-related pictures was also compared to scrambled versions of these pictures. Results showed that different areas of the occipito-temporal cortex were more or less recruited depending on whether a face or a body was perceived, as it has already been reported by several recent studies. The implication of present findings for a general framework of person identification is discussed. [less ▲]

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