References of "Maquet, Pierre"
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See detailAbility to Maintain Internal Arousal and Motivation Modulates Brain Responses to Emotions
Sterpenich, Virginie; Schwartz, Sophie; MAQUET, Pierre ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2014)

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See detailValidation d’un questionnaire d’ergonomie cognitive relatif au travail chez des patients atteints de sclerose en plaques
Blavier, Adelaïde ULg; DELRUE, Gaël ULg; HENNEN, Julie et al

Poster (2014, December)

We present datas validating the use of our QUIPSEP questionnaire among multiple sclerosis patients actually employed.

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See detailFatigue et auto-évaluation chez des patients atteints de sclérose en plaques
DELRUE, Gaël ULg; Blavier, Adelaïde ULg; HENNEN, Julie et al

Poster (2014, December)

Different fatigue scales specific for multiple sclerosis patients correlate quite differently with other psychological measures which gives rise to a necessary reflexion about the tools used in clinical ... [more ▼]

Different fatigue scales specific for multiple sclerosis patients correlate quite differently with other psychological measures which gives rise to a necessary reflexion about the tools used in clinical practice and their meanings. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman cortical excitability depends on time spent awake and circadian phase
Ly, Julien ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg et al

Scientific conference (2014, October 04)

At any point in time, human performance results from the interaction of two main factors: a circadian signal varying with the time of the day and the sleep need accrued throughout the preceding waking ... [more ▼]

At any point in time, human performance results from the interaction of two main factors: a circadian signal varying with the time of the day and the sleep need accrued throughout the preceding waking period. But what’s happen at the cortical cerebral level? We used a novel technique coupling transcranial magnetic stimulation with electroencephalography (TMS/EEG) to assess the influence of time spent awake and circadian phasis on human cortical excitability. Twenty-two healthy young men underwent 8 TMS/EEG sessions during a 28 hour sleep deprivation protocole. We found that cortical excitability depends on both time spent awake and circadian phasis. [less ▲]

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See detailAutomatic artifact detection for whole-night polysomnographic sleep recordings
Coppieters't Wallant, Dorothée ULg; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

Poster (2014, September 17)

Detecting of bad channels and artifacts for whole-night polysomnographic recordings is very time consuming and tedious. We therefore developed an automatic procedure to automatize this job.

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See detailHuman cortical excitability depends on time awake and circadian phase
Ly, Julien ULg; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

Conference (2014, September 17)

At any point in time, human performance results from the interaction of two main factors: a circadian signal varying with the time of the day and the sleep need accrued throughout the preceding waking ... [more ▼]

At any point in time, human performance results from the interaction of two main factors: a circadian signal varying with the time of the day and the sleep need accrued throughout the preceding waking period. But what’s happen at the cortical cerebral level? We used a novel technique coupling transcranial magnetic stimulation with electroencephalography (TMS/EEG) to assess the influence of time spent awake and circadian phasis on human cortical excitability. Twenty-two healthy young men underwent 8 TMS/EEG sessions during a 28 hour sleep deprivation protocole. We found that cortical excitability depends on both time spent awake and circadian phasis. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman cortical excitability depends on time spent awake and circadian phase
Ly, Julien ULg; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

Conference (2014, September 17)

At any point in time, human performance results from the interaction of two main factors: a circadian signal varying with the time of the day and the sleep need accrued throughout the preceding waking ... [more ▼]

At any point in time, human performance results from the interaction of two main factors: a circadian signal varying with the time of the day and the sleep need accrued throughout the preceding waking period. But what’s happen at the cortical cerebral level? We used a novel technique coupling transcranial magnetic stimulation with electroencephalography (TMS/EEG) to assess the influence of time spent awake and circadian phasis on human cortical excitability. Twenty-two healthy young men underwent 8 TMS/EEG sessions during a 28 hour sleep deprivation protocole. We found that cortical excitability depends on both time spent awake and circadian phasis. [less ▲]

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See detailDiagnosing multiple sclerosis with a gait measuring system, an analysis of the motor fatigue, and machine learning
Pierard, Sébastien ULg; Azrour, Samir ULg; Phan-Ba, Rémy et al

in Multiple Sclerosis Journal (2014, September 11), 20(S1), 171

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See detailAutomatic biorythms description from actigraphic data
González y Viagas, Miguel ULg; Ly, Julien ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

Poster (2014, September)

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See detailCortical excitability dynamics of during sleep deprivation set PVT performance
Borsu, Chloé; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Ly, Julien ULg et al

Poster (2014, September)

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See detailThe circadian system sets the temporal organization of basic human neuronal function
Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Ly, Julien; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

Conference (2014, June 16)

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See detailMemory reactivation during rapid eye movement sleep promotes its generalization and integration in cortical stores.
Sterpenich, Virginie; Schmidt, Christina ULg; Albouy, Genevieve et al

in Sleep (2014), 37(6), 1061-751075-1075

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Memory reactivation appears to be a fundamental process in memory consolidation. In this study we tested the influence of memory reactivation during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep on ... [more ▼]

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Memory reactivation appears to be a fundamental process in memory consolidation. In this study we tested the influence of memory reactivation during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep on memory performance and brain responses at retrieval in healthy human participants. PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-six healthy subjects (28 women and 28 men, age [mean +/- standard deviation]: 21.6 +/- 2.2 y) participated in this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. METHODS AND RESULTS: Auditory cues were associated with pictures of faces during their encoding. These memory cues delivered during REM sleep enhanced subsequent accurate recollections but also false recognitions. These results suggest that reactivated memories interacted with semantically related representations, and induced new creative associations, which subsequently reduced the distinction between new and previously encoded exemplars. Cues had no effect if presented during stage 2 sleep, or if they were not associated with faces during encoding. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed that following exposure to conditioned cues during REM sleep, responses to faces during retrieval were enhanced both in a visual area and in a cortical region of multisensory (auditory-visual) convergence. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that reactivating memories during REM sleep enhances cortical responses during retrieval, suggesting the integration of recent memories within cortical circuits, favoring the generalization and schematization of the information. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuroimaging, cognition, light and circadian rhythms
Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg; Schmidt, Christina ULg et al

in Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience [=FNSYS] (2014)

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See detailLa Narcolepsie-Cataplexie aujourd'hui
DEPIERREUX, Frédérique ULg; FANIELLE, Julien ULg; Martin-Lecomte, Marianne ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014), 69(2), 72-81

Diagnostic criteria and pathophysiology of narcolepsy- <br />cataplexy have evolved considerably over the last 10 years. <br />The main cause, already mentioned in a previous paper, in the <br />Revue ... [more ▼]

Diagnostic criteria and pathophysiology of narcolepsy- <br />cataplexy have evolved considerably over the last 10 years. <br />The main cause, already mentioned in a previous paper, in the <br />Revue Médicale de Liège, in 2002, is based, in human beings, <br />on a destruction of specific cells located in the lateral and <br />posterior part of the hypothalamus (the perifornical nuclei, <br />containing some 70,000 neurons), producing peptides which <br />stimulate the central nervous system; they are called hypocretins <br />or orexins. The role of autoimmunity in their disappearance <br />becomes more evident. The treatment is simplified but <br />remains symptomatic. It is mainly based on Sodium Oxybate <br />or Gamma-Hydroxybutyrate, syrup, prescribed for the night. <br />The authors report on their own experience in this regard and <br />on future therapeutics more targeted towards the cause of the <br />disease. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep loss changes executive brain responses in the wake maintenance zone
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

Conference (2014)

Objectives:Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural ... [more ▼]

Objectives:Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural responses are differentially modulated by a clock gene PERIOD3 polymorphism. Here, we investigated interindividual differences on executive brain responses under SD. Critically, we focused on the circadian evening wake maintenance zone (WMZ), a key time-point for sleep-wake regulation. Methods:Thirty healthy young volunteers, genotyped for the PER3 polymorphism (10 PER3 5/5;20 PER3 4/4 homozygotes), underwent42-h SD under constant routine conditions. They performed a 3-back working memorytask in 13successivefMRI sessions. To compare neural activity in the WMZ before and during SD, sessions were realigned according to individual dim light melatonin onset. Results:We tested for a group (PER3 5/5>PER3 4/4) by session effect (WMZ before vs. during SD). From the first evening WMZ(i.e. during a normal waking day) to the second (i.e. following 40h of continuous waking), PER3 5/5 individuals relative toPER3 4/4 showed significantly larger increase in responsesin the left mid-cingulate, bilateral precuneus and thalamus. Interestingly, these regions are involved in executive processes and arousal regulation (thalamus). Conclusions:These results show that the strong circadian wake-maintenance signal depends on sleep pressure, in a PER3-genotype dependent manner. Interestingly, pronounced genotype differences wereobserved in the thalamus, an area that compensates potential lower cortical activity under SD. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep loss changes executive brain responses in the wake maintenance zone
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2014), 23(1), 61

Objectives: Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural responses are differentially modulated by a clock gene PERIOD3 polymorphism. Here, we investigated interindividual differences on executive brain responses under SD. Critically, we focused on the circadian evening wake maintenance zone (WMZ), a key time-point for sleep-wake regulation. Methods: Thirty healthy young volunteers, genotyped for the PER3 polymorphism (10 PER3 5/5; 20 PER3 4/4 homozygotes), underwent 42-h SD under constant routine conditions. They performed a 3-back working memory task in 13 successive fMRI sessions. To compare neural activity in the WMZ before and during SD, sessions were realigned according to individual dim light melatonin onset. Results: We tested for a group (PER3 5/5 > PER3 4/4) by session effect (WMZ before vs. during SD). From the fi rst evening WMZ (i.e. during a normal waking day) to the second (i.e. following 40 h of continuous waking), PER3 5/5 individuals relative to PER3 4/4 showed significantly larger increase in responses in the left mid-cingulate, bilateral precuneus and thalamus. Interestingly, these regions are involved in executive processes and arousal regulation (thalamus). Conclusions: These results show that the strong circadian wake-maintenance signal depends on sleep pressure, in a PER3-genotype dependent manner. Interestingly, pronounced genotype differences were observed in the thalamus, an area that compensates potential lower cortical activity under SD. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (10 ULg)