References of "Maquet, Pierre"
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See detailBoth the hippocampus and striatum are involved in consolidation of motor sequence memory.
Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Sterpenich, Virginie ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in Neuron (2008), 58(2), 261-72

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate the cerebral correlates of motor sequence memory consolidation. Participants were scanned while training on an implicit oculomotor ... [more ▼]

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate the cerebral correlates of motor sequence memory consolidation. Participants were scanned while training on an implicit oculomotor sequence learning task and during a single testing session taking place 30 min, 5 hr, or 24 hr later. During training, responses observed in hippocampus and striatum were linearly related to the gain in performance observed overnight, but not over the day. Responses in both structures were significantly larger at 24 hr than at 30 min or 5 hr. Additionally, the competitive interaction observed between these structures during training became cooperative overnight. These results stress the importance of both hippocampus and striatum in procedural memory consolidation. Responses in these areas during training seem to condition the overnight memory processing that is associated with a change in their functional interactions. These results show that both structures interact during motor sequence consolidation to optimize subsequent behavior. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuroimaging insights into the pathophysiology of sleep disorders.
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, Manuel et al

in Sleep (2008), 31(6), 777-94

Neuroimaging methods can be used to investigate whether sleep disorders are associated with specific changes in brain structure or regional activity. However, it is still unclear how these new data might ... [more ▼]

Neuroimaging methods can be used to investigate whether sleep disorders are associated with specific changes in brain structure or regional activity. However, it is still unclear how these new data might improve our understanding of the pathophysiology underlying adult sleep disorders. Here we review functional brain imaging findings in major intrinsic sleep disorders (i.e., idiopathic insomnia, narcolepsy, and obstructive sleep apnea) and in abnormal motor behavior during sleep (i.e., periodic limb movement disorder and REM sleep behavior disorder). The studies reviewed include neuroanatomical assessments (voxel-based morphometry, magnetic resonance spectroscopy), metabolic/functional investigations (positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging), and ligand marker measurements. Based on the current state of the research, we suggest that brain imaging is a useful approach to assess the structural and functional correlates of sleep impairments as well as better understand the cerebral consequences of various therapeutic approaches. Modem neuroimaging techniques therefore provide a valuable tool to gain insight into possible pathophysiological mechanisms of sleep disorders in adult humans. [less ▲]

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See detailSpontaneous neural activity during human slow wave sleep.
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, Manuel ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2008), 105(39), 15160-5

Slow wave sleep (SWS) is associated with spontaneous brain oscillations that are thought to participate in sleep homeostasis and to support the processing of information related to the experiences of the ... [more ▼]

Slow wave sleep (SWS) is associated with spontaneous brain oscillations that are thought to participate in sleep homeostasis and to support the processing of information related to the experiences of the previous awake period. At the cellular level, during SWS, a slow oscillation (<1 Hz) synchronizes firing patterns in large neuronal populations and is reflected on electroencephalography (EEG) recordings as large-amplitude, low-frequency waves. By using simultaneous EEG and event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we characterized the transient changes in brain activity consistently associated with slow waves (>140 microV) and delta waves (75-140 microV) during SWS in 14 non-sleep-deprived normal human volunteers. Significant increases in activity were associated with these waves in several cortical areas, including the inferior frontal, medial prefrontal, precuneus, and posterior cingulate areas. Compared with baseline activity, slow waves are associated with significant activity in the parahippocampal gyrus, cerebellum, and brainstem, whereas delta waves are related to frontal responses. No decrease in activity was observed. This study demonstrates that SWS is not a state of brain quiescence, but rather is an active state during which brain activity is consistently synchronized to the slow oscillation in specific cerebral regions. The partial overlap between the response pattern related to SWS waves and the waking default mode network is consistent with the fascinating hypothesis that brain responses synchronized by the slow oscillation restore microwake-like activity patterns that facilitate neuronal interactions. [less ▲]

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See detailQue mesure la neuro-imagerie fonctionnelle: IRMf, TEP & MEG?
Gosseries, Olivia ULg; Demertzi, Athina ULg; Noirhomme, Quentin ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63(5-6), 231-7

Functional cerebral imaging techniques allow the in vivo study of human cognitive and sensorimotor functions in physiological or pathological conditions. In this paper, we review the advantages and ... [more ▼]

Functional cerebral imaging techniques allow the in vivo study of human cognitive and sensorimotor functions in physiological or pathological conditions. In this paper, we review the advantages and limitations of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetoencephalography (MEG). fMRI and PET measure haemodynamic changes induced by regional changes in neuronal activity. These techniques have a high spatial resolution (a few millimeters), but a poor temporal resolution (a few seconds to several minutes). Electroencephalogram (EEG) and MEG measure the neuronal electrical or magnetic activity with a high temporal resolution (i.e., milliseconds) albeit with a poorer spatial resolution (i.e., a few millimeters to one centimeter). The combination of these different neuroimaging techniques allows studying different components of the brain's activity (e.g., neurovascular coupling, electromagnetic activity) with both a high temporal and spatial resolution. [less ▲]

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See detailProteomic changes in rat hippocampus and adrenals following short-term sleep deprivation.
Poirrier, Jean-Etienne; Guillonneau, Francois; Renaut, Jenny et al

in Proteome Science (2008), 6

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To identify the biochemical changes induced by sleep deprivation at a proteomic level, we compared the hippocampal proteome of rats either after 4 hours of sleep or sleep deprivation ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To identify the biochemical changes induced by sleep deprivation at a proteomic level, we compared the hippocampal proteome of rats either after 4 hours of sleep or sleep deprivation obtained by gentle handling. Because sleep deprivation might induce some stress, we also analyzed proteomic changes in rat adrenals in the same conditions. After sleep deprivation, proteins from both tissues were extracted and subjected to 2D-DIGE analysis followed by protein identification through mass spectrometry and database search. RESULTS: In the hippocampus, 87 spots showed significant variation between sleep and sleep deprivation, with more proteins showing higher abundance in the latter case. Of these, 16 proteins were present in sufficient amount for a sequencing attempt and among the 12 identified proteins, inferred affected cellular functions include cell metabolism, energy pathways, transport and vesicle trafficking, cytoskeleton and protein processing. Although we did not observe classical, macroscopic effect of stress in sleep-deprived rats, 47 protein spots showed significant variation in adrenal tissue between sleep and sleep deprivation, with more proteins showing higher abundance following sleep. Of these, 16 proteins were also present in sufficient amount for a sequencing attempt and among the 13 identified proteins, the most relevant cellular function that was affected was cell metabolism. CONCLUSION: At a proteomic level, short term sleep deprivation is characterized by a higher expression of some proteins in the hippocampus and a lower abundance of other proteins in the adrenals (compared to normal sleep control). Altogether, this could indicate a general activation of a number of cellular mechanisms involved in the maintenance of wakefulness and in increased energy expenditure during sleep deprivation. These findings are relevant to suggested functions of sleep like energy repletion and the restoration of molecular stocks or a more global homeostasis of synaptic processes. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural networks for short-term memory for order differentiate high and low proficiency bilinguals
Majerus, Steve ULg; Belayachi, Sanaa ULg; De Smedt, Bert et al

in NeuroImage (2008), 42

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See detailSelf-reflection across time: cortical midline structures differentiate between present and past selves
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg et al

in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience (2008), 3(3), 244-252

The processing of personal changes across time and the ability to differentiate between representations of present and past selves are crucial for developing a mature sense of identity. In this study, we ... [more ▼]

The processing of personal changes across time and the ability to differentiate between representations of present and past selves are crucial for developing a mature sense of identity. In this study, we explored the neural correlates of self-reflection across time using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). College undergraduates were asked to reflect on their own psychological characteristics and those of an intimate other, for both the present time period (i.e. at college) and a past time period (i.e. high school years) that involved significant personal changes. Cortical midline structures (CMS) were commonly recruited by the four reflective tasks (reflecting on the present self, past self, present other and past other), relative to a control condition (making valence judgments). More importantly, however, the degree of activity in CMS also varied significantly according to the target of reflection, with the ventral and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex and the posterior cingulate cortex being more recruited when reflecting on the present self than when reflecting on the past self or when reflecting on the other person. These findings suggest that CMS may contribute to differentiate between representations of present and past selves. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain function in physiologically, pharmacologically, and pathologically altered states of consciousness
Boveroux, Pierre ULg; Bonhomme, Vincent ULg; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg et al

in International Anesthesiology Clinics (2008), 46(3), 131-146

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See detailOffline processing of memories induced by perceptual visual learning during subsequent wakefulness and sleep: A behavioral study.
Matarazzo, Luca ULg; Franko, Edit; Maquet, Pierre ULg et al

in Journal of Vision (2008), 8(4), 71-9

To further characterize perceptual memory consolidation during sleep, we used a coarse orientation discrimination task in which participants had to discriminate the orientation of orthogonal gratings ... [more ▼]

To further characterize perceptual memory consolidation during sleep, we used a coarse orientation discrimination task in which participants had to discriminate the orientation of orthogonal gratings occluded by increasing levels of noise. In a first study (N = 11), we showed that the learning effect in this task is retinotopic (position-specific) and orientation specific. In a second experiment, we assessed the effect of nocturnal sleep, as opposed to the effect of time, on perceptual learning. A first group of participants was trained in the morning, tested in the evening and retested the next morning (morning-evening-morning, MEM, N = 11); a second group was trained in the evening, tested the next morning, and retested in the evening (evening-morning-evening; EME; N = 12). Between training and testing, EME subjects improved significantly more (after a night of sleep) than MEM subjects (after 12 waking hours). Similarly, between test and retest, performance of MEM subjects (after a full night of sleep) improved significantly more than in EME subjects (after 12 further waking hours). These results suggest a beneficial effect of sleep on coarse orientation discrimination. Further studies are needed to characterize the neural correlates of this perceptual learning and the offline consolidation of perceptual memory. [less ▲]

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See detailBaseline brain activity fluctuations predict somatosensory perception in humans
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Schnakers, Caroline ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2007), 104(29), 12187-12192

In perceptual experiments, within-individual fluctuations in perception are observed across multiple presentations of the same stimuli, a phenomenon that remains only partially understood. Here, by means ... [more ▼]

In perceptual experiments, within-individual fluctuations in perception are observed across multiple presentations of the same stimuli, a phenomenon that remains only partially understood. Here, by means of thulium-yttrium/aluminum- garnet laser and event-related functional MRI, we tested whether variability in perception of identical stimuli relates to differences in prestimulus, baseline brain activity. Results indicate a positive relationship between conscious perception of low-intensity somatosensory stimuli and immediately preceding levels of baseline activity in medial thalamus and the lateral frontoparietal network, respectively, which are thought to relate to vigilance and "external monitoring." Conversely, there was a negative correlation between subsequent reporting of conscious perception and baseline activity in a set of regions encompassing posterior cingulate/ precuneus and temporoparietal cortices, possibly relating to introspection and self-oriented processes. At nociceptive levels of stimulation, pain-intensity ratings positively correlated with baseline fluctuations in anterior cingulate cortex in an area known to be involved in the affective dimension of pain. These results suggest that baseline brain-activity fluctuations may profoundly modify our conscious perception of the external world. [less ▲]

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See detailWhen thoughts become action: An fMRI paradigm to study volitional brain activity in non-communicative brain injured patients
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Coleman, M. R.; Davis, M. H. et al

in NeuroImage (2007), 36(3), 979-992

The assessment of voluntary behavior in non-communicative brain injured patients is often challenging due to the existence of profound motor impairment. In the absence of a full understanding of the ... [more ▼]

The assessment of voluntary behavior in non-communicative brain injured patients is often challenging due to the existence of profound motor impairment. In the absence of a full understanding of the neural correlates of consciousness, even a normal activation in response to passive sensory stimulation cannot be considered as proof of the presence of awareness in these patients. In contrast, predicted activation in response to the instruction to perform a mental imagery task would provide evidence of voluntary task-dependent brain activity, and hence of consciousness, in non-communicative patients. However, no data yet exist to indicate which imagery instructions would yield reliable single subject activation. The aim of the present study was to establish such a paradigm in healthy volunteers. Two exploratory experiments evaluated the reproducibility of individual brain activation elicited by four distinct mental imagery tasks. The two most robust mental imagery tasks were found to be spatial navigation and motor imagery. In a third experiment, where these two tasks were directly compared, differentiation of each task from one another and from rest periods was assessed blindly using a priori criteria and was correct for every volunteer. The spatial navigation and motor imagery tasks described here permit the identification of volitional brain activation at the single subject level, without a motor response. Volunteer as well as patient data [Owen, A. M., Coleman, M.R., Boly, M., Davis, M.H., Laureys, S., Pickard J.D., 2006. Detecting awareness in the vegetative state. Science 313, 1402] strongly suggest that this' paradigm may provide a method for assessing the presence of volitional brain activity, and thus of consciousness, in non-communicative brain-injured patients. (c) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailExploration of the neuronal substrates of Directed Forgetting with fMRI.
Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Hogge, Michaël; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Conference (2007, June 26)

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See detailExploration of the neuronal substrates of Directed Forgetting with fMRI
Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Hogge, Michaël; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Conference (2007, June 01)

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See detailDistinct regions of the medial prefrontal cortex are associated with self-referential processing and perspective taking
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Ruby, Perinne; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2007), 19(6), 935-944

The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) appears to play a prominent role in two fundamental aspects of social cognition, that is, self-referential processing and perspective taking. However, it is currently ... [more ▼]

The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) appears to play a prominent role in two fundamental aspects of social cognition, that is, self-referential processing and perspective taking. However, it is currently unclear whether the same or different regions of the MPFC mediate these two interdependent processes. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study sought to clarify the issue by manipulating both dimensions in a factorial design. Participants judged the extent to which trait adjectives described their own personality (e.g., 'Are you sociable?') or the personality of a close friend (e.g., 'Is Caroline sociable?') and were also asked to put themselves in the place of their friend (i.e., to take a third-person perspective) and estimate how this person would judge the adjectives, with the target of the judgments again being either the self (e.g., 'According to Caroline, are you sociable?') or the other person (e.g., 'According to Caroline, is she sociable?'). We found that self-referential processing (i.e., judgments targeting the self vs. the other person) yielded activation in the ventral and dorsal anterior MPFC, whereas perspective taking (i.e., adopting the other person's perspective, rather than one's own, when making judgments) resulted in activation in the posterior dorsal MPFC; the interaction between the two dimensions yielded activation in the left dorsal MPFC. These findings show that self-referential processing and perspective taking recruit distinct regions of the MPFC and suggest that the left dorsal MPFC may be involved in decoupling one's own from other people's perspectives on the self. [less ▲]

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See detailActive brain processes during human quiescent sleep: an EEG/fMRI study of non-REM slow oscillations
Dang-Vu, T.; Schabus, M.; Desseilles, Martin ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology (2007, May), 254(Suppl. 3), 50

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See detailfMRI study of hypnosis-induced analgesia
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Schnakers, Caroline ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology (2007, May), 254(Suppl. 3), 38-39

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See detailShort-term memory and the left intraparietal sulcus: Focus of attention? Further evidence from a face short-term memory paradigm
Majerus, Steve ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Poncelet, Martine ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2007), 35(1), 353-367

This study explored the validity of an attentional account for the involvement of the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS) in visual STM tasks. This account considers that during STM tasks, the IPS acts as an ... [more ▼]

This study explored the validity of an attentional account for the involvement of the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS) in visual STM tasks. This account considers that during STM tasks, the IPS acts as an attentional modulator, maintaining activation in long-term memory networks that underlie the initial perception and processing of the specific information to be retained. In a recognition STM paradigm, we presented sequences of unfamiliar faces and instructed the participants to remember different types of information: either the identity of the faces or their order of presentation. We hypothesized that, if the left IPS acts as an attentional modulator, it should be active in both conditions, but connected to different neural networks specialized in serial order or face identity processing. Our results showed that the left IPS was activated during both order and identity encoding conditions, but for different reasons. During order encoding, the left IPS showed functional connectivity with order processing areas in the right IPS, bilateral premotor and cerebellar cortices, reproducing earlier results obtained in a verbal STM experiment. During identity encoding, the left IPS showed preferential functional connectivity with right temporal, inferior parietal and medial frontal areas involved in detailed face processing. These results not only support an attentional account of left IPS involvement in visual STM, but given their similarity with previous results obtained for a verbal STM task, they further highlight the importance of the left IPS as an attentional modulator in a variety of STM tasks. [less ▲]

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See detailAn in computo investigation of the Landau-Kleffner syndrome.
Bonjean, Maxime ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg et al

in Conference proceedings : ... Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Conference (2007), 2007

We describe a computational model of the thalamus and the cortex able to reproduce some essential epileptiform features commonly observed in the Landau-Kleffner syndrome. Investigation with this realistic ... [more ▼]

We describe a computational model of the thalamus and the cortex able to reproduce some essential epileptiform features commonly observed in the Landau-Kleffner syndrome. Investigation with this realistic model leads us to the formulation of a cellular mechanism that could be responsible for the epileptic discharges occuring with this severe syndrome. Understanding this mechanism is of prime importance for developing new therapeutical strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of attention on emotional face processing in depression : a functional MRI study
Desseilles, Martin; Maquet, Pierre ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailFASST - fMRI Artefact rejection and Sleep Scoring Toolbox
Phillips, Christophe ULg; Schrouff, Jessica ULg; Coppieters, Dorothée ULg et al

Software (2007)

"FASST" stands for "fMRI Artefact rejection and Sleep Scoring Toolbox". This M/EEG toolbox is developed by researchers from the Cyclotron Research Centre, University of Li ege, Belgium, with the financial ... [more ▼]

"FASST" stands for "fMRI Artefact rejection and Sleep Scoring Toolbox". This M/EEG toolbox is developed by researchers from the Cyclotron Research Centre, University of Li ege, Belgium, with the financial support of the Fonds de la Recherche Scienti que-FNRS, the Queen Elizabeth's funding, and the University of Li ege. On Dr. Pierre Maquet's impulse we started writing these tools to analyze our sleep EEG-fMRI data and tackle four crucial issues: * Continuous M/EEG. Long multi-channel recording of M/EEG data can be enormous. These data are cumbersome to handle as it usually involves displaying, exploring, comparing, chunking, appending data sets, etc. * EEG-fMRI. When recording EEG and fMRI data simultaneously, the EEG signal acquired contains, on top of the usual neural and ocular activity, artefacts induced by the gradient switching and high static eld of an MR scanner. The rejection of theses artefacts is not easy especially when dealing with brain spontaneous activity. * Scoring M/EEG. Reviewing and scoring continuous M/EEG recordings, such as is common with sleep recordings, is a tedious task as the scorer has to manually browse through the entire data set and give a \score" to each time-window displayed. * Waves detection. Continuous and triggerless recordings of M/EEG data show specifi c wave patterns, characteristic of the subject's state (e.g., sleep spindles or slow waves). Their automatic detection is thus important to assess those states. [less ▲]

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