References of "Maquet, Pierre"
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See detailSleep: Implications for Theories of Dreaming and Consciousness
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, Manuel; Cologan, Victor ULg et al

in Banks, William (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Consciousness (2009)

This article discusses the relationships between sleep and consciousness.

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See detailPeriod 2 regulates neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation in the adult hippocampus.
Borgs, Laurence ULg; Beukelaers, Pierre ULg; Vandenbosch, Renaud ULg et al

in BMC Neuroscience (2009), 10

BACKGROUND: Newborn granule neurons are generated from proliferating neural stem/progenitor cells and integrated into mature synaptic networks in the adult dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Since light ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Newborn granule neurons are generated from proliferating neural stem/progenitor cells and integrated into mature synaptic networks in the adult dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Since light/dark variations of the mitotic index and DNA synthesis occur in many tissues, we wanted to unravel the role of the clock-controlled Period2 gene (mPer2) in timing cell cycle kinetics and neurogenesis in the adult DG. RESULTS: In contrast to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, we observed a non-rhythmic constitutive expression of mPER2 in the dentate gyrus. We provide evidence that mPER2 is expressed in proliferating neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) and persists in early post-mitotic and mature newborn neurons from the adult DG. In vitro and in vivo analysis of a mouse line mutant in the mPer2 gene (Per2Brdm1), revealed a higher density of dividing NPCs together with an increased number of immature newborn neurons populating the DG. However, we showed that the lack of mPer2 does not change the total amount of mature adult-generated hippocampal neurons, because of a compensatory increase in neuronal cell death. CONCLUSION: Taken together, these data demonstrated a functional link between the constitutive expression of mPER2 and the intrinsic control of neural stem/progenitor cells proliferation, cell death and neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult mice. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurobiological bases of suicidality in major depression
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Scwartz, Sophie; Dang Vu, Thanh et al

in World Journal of Biological Psychiatry (2009), 9(Suppl. 1),

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See detailAbnormal neural filtering of irrelevant visual information in depression
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Sterpenich, Virginie et al

in NeuroImage (2009), 45(Suppl. 1),

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See detailModulation of fMRI assessed brain responses to blue and green light by sleep homeostasis, circadian phase and PER3 polymorphism
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Archer, Simon; Wuillaume, Catherine et al

in Sleep (2009), 32(Suppl. 1),

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See detailPain and non-pain processing during hypnosis: a thulium-YAG event-related fMRI study.
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2009), 47(3), 1047-54

The neural mechanisms underlying the antinociceptive effects of hypnosis still remain unclear. Using a parametric single-trial thulium-YAG laser fMRI paradigm, we assessed changes in brain activation and ... [more ▼]

The neural mechanisms underlying the antinociceptive effects of hypnosis still remain unclear. Using a parametric single-trial thulium-YAG laser fMRI paradigm, we assessed changes in brain activation and connectivity related to the hypnotic state as compared to normal wakefulness in 13 healthy volunteers. Behaviorally, a difference in subjective ratings was found between normal wakefulness and hypnotic state for both non-painful and painful intensity-matched stimuli applied to the left hand. In normal wakefulness, non-painful range stimuli activated brainstem, contralateral primary somatosensory (S1) and bilateral insular cortices. Painful stimuli activated additional areas encompassing thalamus, bilateral striatum, anterior cingulate (ACC), premotor and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices. In hypnosis, intensity-matched stimuli in both the non-painful and painful range failed to elicit any cerebral activation. The interaction analysis identified that contralateral thalamus, bilateral striatum and ACC activated more in normal wakefulness compared to hypnosis during painful versus non-painful stimulation. Finally, we demonstrated hypnosis-related increases in functional connectivity between S1 and distant anterior insular and prefrontal cortices, possibly reflecting top-down modulation. [less ▲]

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See detailHypnosis and cingulate-mediated mechanisms of analgesia
FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Vogt, Brent; Maquet, Pierre ULg et al

in Vogt, Brent (Ed.) Cingulate Neurobiology and Disease (2009)

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See detailCorrélats cérébraux du rêve
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg et al

in Médecine du Sommeil (2009), 6(2), 44-51

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See detailSome facts about sleep relevant for Landau-Kleffner syndrome.
Mascetti, Laura ULg; Foret, Ariane ULg; Bonjean, Maxime et al

in Epilepsia (2009), 50 Suppl 7

Our understanding of the neural mechanisms of non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) is steadily increasing. Given the intriguing activation of paroxysmal activity during NREM sleep in patients with Landau ... [more ▼]

Our understanding of the neural mechanisms of non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) is steadily increasing. Given the intriguing activation of paroxysmal activity during NREM sleep in patients with Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS), a thorough characterization of commonalities and differences between the neural correlates of LKS paroxysms and normal sleep oscillations might provide useful information on the neural underpinning of this disorder. Especially, given the suspected role of sleep in brain plasticity, this type of information is needed to assess the link between cognitive deterioration and electroencephalography (EEG) paroxysms during sleep. [less ▲]

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See detailRejection of pulse related artefact (PRA) from continuous electroencephalographic (EEG) time series recorded during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using constraint independent component analysis (cICA).
Leclercq, Yves ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2009), 44(3), 679-91

Rejection of the pulse related artefact (PRA) from electroencephalographic (EEG) time series recorded simultaneously with fMRI data is difficult, particularly during NREM sleep because of the similarities ... [more ▼]

Rejection of the pulse related artefact (PRA) from electroencephalographic (EEG) time series recorded simultaneously with fMRI data is difficult, particularly during NREM sleep because of the similarities between sleep slow waves and PRA, in both temporal and frequency domains and the need to work with non-averaged data. Here we introduce an algorithm based on constrained independent component analysis (cICA) for PRA removal. This method has several advantages: (1) automatic detection of the components corresponding to the PRA; (2) stability of the solution and (3) computational treatability. Using multichannel EEG recordings obtained in a 3 T MR scanner, with and without concomitant fMRI acquisition, we provide evidence for the sensitivity and specificity of the method in rejecting PRA in various sleep and waking conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep : Implications for Theories of Dreaming and Consciousness
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, Manuel; Cologan, Victor et al

in Banks, William (Ed.) Encyclopaedia of Consciousness (2009)

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See detailSleep and Sleep States: PET activation patterns
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Squire, Larry (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Neuroscience (2009)

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See detailNeuroimaging in Sleep and Sleep Disorders
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schwartz, Sophie et al

in Chokroverty, Sudhansu (Ed.) Sleep Disorders Medicine (2009)

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See detailPET activation patterns
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Stickgold, Robert; Walker, Matthew (Eds.) The Neuroscience of Sleep (2009)

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See detailLight as a modulator of cognitive brain function
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg; Dijk, D. J.

in Trends in Cognitive Sciences (2009), 13(10), 429-38

Humans are a diurnal species usually exposed to light while engaged in cognitive tasks. Light not only guides performance on these tasks through vision but also exerts non-visual effects that are mediated ... [more ▼]

Humans are a diurnal species usually exposed to light while engaged in cognitive tasks. Light not only guides performance on these tasks through vision but also exerts non-visual effects that are mediated in part by recently discovered retinal ganglion cells maximally sensitive to blue light. We review recent neuroimaging studies which demonstrate that the wavelength, duration and intensity of light exposure modulate brain responses to (non-visual) cognitive tasks. These responses to light are initially observed in alertness-related subcortical structures (hypothalamus, brainstem, thalamus) and limbic areas (amygdala and hippocampus), followed by modulations of activity in cortical areas, which can ultimately affect behaviour. Light emerges as an important modulator of brain function and cognition. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional connectivity in the default network during resting state is preserved in a vegetative but not in a brain dead patient.
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Tshibanda, Luaba ULg; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2009), 30(8), 2393-400

Recent studies on spontaneous fluctuations in the functional MRI blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal in awake healthy subjects showed the presence of coherent fluctuations among functionally ... [more ▼]

Recent studies on spontaneous fluctuations in the functional MRI blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal in awake healthy subjects showed the presence of coherent fluctuations among functionally defined neuroanatomical networks. However, the functional significance of these spontaneous BOLD fluctuations remains poorly understood. By means of 3 T functional MRI, we demonstrate absent cortico-thalamic BOLD functional connectivity (i.e. between posterior cingulate/precuneal cortex and medial thalamus), but preserved cortico-cortical connectivity within the default network in a case of vegetative state (VS) studied 2.5 years following cardio-respiratory arrest, as documented by extensive behavioral and paraclinical assessments. In the VS patient, as in age-matched controls, anticorrelations could also be observed between posterior cingulate/precuneus and a previously identified task-positive cortical network. Both correlations and anticorrelations were significantly reduced in VS as compared to controls. A similar approach in a brain dead patient did not show any such long-distance functional connectivity. We conclude that some slow coherent BOLD fluctuations previously identified in healthy awake human brain can be found in alive but unaware patients, and are thus unlikely to be uniquely due to ongoing modifications of conscious thoughts. Future studies are needed to give a full characterization of default network connectivity in the VS patients population. [less ▲]

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See detailHomeostatic sleep pressure and responses to sustained attention in the suprachiasmatic area.
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Leclercq, Yves ULg et al

in Science (2009), 324(5926), 516-9

Throughout the day, cognitive performance is under the combined influence of circadian processes and homeostatic sleep pressure. Some people perform best in the morning, whereas others are more alert in ... [more ▼]

Throughout the day, cognitive performance is under the combined influence of circadian processes and homeostatic sleep pressure. Some people perform best in the morning, whereas others are more alert in the evening. These chronotypes provide a unique way to study the effects of sleep-wake regulation on the cerebral mechanisms supporting cognition. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in extreme chronotypes, we found that maintaining attention in the evening was associated with higher activity in evening than morning chronotypes in a region of the locus coeruleus and in a suprachiasmatic area (SCA) including the circadian master clock. Activity in the SCA decreased with increasing homeostatic sleep pressure. This result shows the direct influence of the homeostatic and circadian interaction on the neural activity underpinning human behavior. [less ▲]

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