References of "Maquet, Pierre"
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See detailContribution of sleep to memory consolidation
Shaffii-Le Bourdiec, Anahita; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Mascetti, Laura et al

in Future Neurology (2010), 5(2), 325-338

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See detailDefault network connectivity reflects the level of consciousness in non-communicative brain-damaged patients.
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Noirhomme, Quentin ULg; Tshibanda, Luaba ULg et al

in Brain : A Journal of Neurology (2010), 133(Pt 1), 161-71

The 'default network' is defined as a set of areas, encompassing posterior-cingulate/precuneus, anterior cingulate/mesiofrontal cortex and temporo-parietal junctions, that show more activity at rest than ... [more ▼]

The 'default network' is defined as a set of areas, encompassing posterior-cingulate/precuneus, anterior cingulate/mesiofrontal cortex and temporo-parietal junctions, that show more activity at rest than during attention-demanding tasks. Recent studies have shown that it is possible to reliably identify this network in the absence of any task, by resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity analyses in healthy volunteers. However, the functional significance of these spontaneous brain activity fluctuations remains unclear. The aim of this study was to test if the integrity of this resting-state connectivity pattern in the default network would differ in different pathological alterations of consciousness. Fourteen non-communicative brain-damaged patients and 14 healthy controls participated in the study. Connectivity was investigated using probabilistic independent component analysis, and an automated template-matching component selection approach. Connectivity in all default network areas was found to be negatively correlated with the degree of clinical consciousness impairment, ranging from healthy controls and locked-in syndrome to minimally conscious, vegetative then coma patients. Furthermore, precuneus connectivity was found to be significantly stronger in minimally conscious patients as compared with unconscious patients. Locked-in syndrome patient's default network connectivity was not significantly different from controls. Our results show that default network connectivity is decreased in severely brain-damaged patients, in proportion to their degree of consciousness impairment. Future prospective studies in a larger patient population are needed in order to evaluate the prognostic value of the presented methodology. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep in disorders of consciousness
Cologan, Victor ULg; Schabus, Manuel; LEDOUX, Didier ULg et al

in Sleep Medicine Reviews (2010), 14(2), 97-105

From a behavioral as well as neurobiological point of view, sleep and consciousness are intimately connected. A better understanding of sleep cycles and sleep architecture of patients suffering from ... [more ▼]

From a behavioral as well as neurobiological point of view, sleep and consciousness are intimately connected. A better understanding of sleep cycles and sleep architecture of patients suffering from disorders of consciousness (DOC) might therefore improve the clinical care for these patients as well as our understanding of the neural correlations of consciousness. Defining sleep in severely brain-injured patients is however problematic as both their electrophysiological and sleep patterns differ in many ways from healthy individuals. This paper discusses the concepts involved in the study of sleep of patients suffering from DOC and critically assesses the applicability of standard sleep criteria in these patients. <br /><br />The available literature on comatose and vegetative states as well as that on locked-in and related states following traumatic or non-traumatic severe brain injury will be reviewed. A wide spectrum of sleep disturbances ranging from almost normal patterns to severe loss and architecture disorganization are reported in cases of DOC and some patterns correlate with diagnosis and prognosis. At the present time the interactions of sleep and consciousness in brain-injured patients are a little studied subject but, the authors suggest, a potentially very interesting field of research. [less ▲]

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See detailContributions du sommeil a la consolidation mnésique
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Matarazzo; Foret, Ariane ULg et al

in Biologie Aujourd'hui (2010), 204(2), 139-143

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See detailNeuroimaging of dreaming: state of the art and limitations
Kussé, Caroline ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Mascetti, Laura ULg et al

in International Review of Neurobiology (2010)

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See detailNeuroimaging Insights into the Dreaming Brain
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, Manuel et al

in Dreams and Dreaming (2010)

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See detailWorking memory load affects chronotype- and time-of-day dependent cerebral activity modulations
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Leclercq, Yves ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2010), 19(Suppl. 2),

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See detailBrainstem specific warping improves locus coeruleus functional imaging in humans
Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Schmidt, Christina ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg et al

in Proceedings of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine ... Scientific Meeting and Exhibition. International Society For Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. Scientific Meeting and Exhibition (2010)

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See detailFunctional Neuroimaging Insights into the Physiology of Human Sleep
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, Manuel; Desseilles, Martin ULg et al

in Sleep (2010), 33(12), 1589-1603

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See detailBlue light affects emotional processing in the hypothalamus in Seasonal Affective Disorder
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Hébert, M; Doyon, J et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2010), 19(Suppl. 2),

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See detailSleep-dependent consolidation of declarative memories is triggered by hippocampal activation at encoding
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Rauchs, Géraldine; Feyers, Dorothée ULg et al

in Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of th Belgian Association for Psychological Science (2010)

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See detailThe commonality of neural networks for verbal and visual short-term memory.
Majerus, Steve ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Martinez Perez, Trecy ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2010), 22(11), 2570-2593

Although many neuroimaging studies have considered verbal and visual short-term memory (STM) as relying on neurally segregated short-term buffer systems, the present study explored the existence of shared ... [more ▼]

Although many neuroimaging studies have considered verbal and visual short-term memory (STM) as relying on neurally segregated short-term buffer systems, the present study explored the existence of shared neural correlates supporting verbal and visual STM. We hypothesized that networks involved in attentional and executive processes, as well as networks involved in serial order processing, underlie STM for both verbal and visual list information, with neural specificity restricted to sensory areas involved in processing the specific items to be retained. Participants were presented sequences of nonwords or unfamiliar faces, and were instructed to maintain and recognize order or item information. For encoding and retrieval phases, null conjunction analysis revealed an identical fronto-parieto-cerebellar network comprising the left intraparietal sulcus, bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and the bilateral cerebellum, irrespective of information type and modality. A network centered around the right intraparietal sulcus supported STM for order information, in both verbal and visual modalities. Modality-specific effects were observed in left superior temporal and mid-fusiform areas associated with phonological and orthographic processing during the verbal STM tasks, and in right hippocampal and fusiform face processing areas during the visual STM tasks, wherein these modality effects were most pronounced when storing item information. The present results suggest that STM emerges from the deployment of modality-independent attentional and serial ordering processes toward sensory networks underlying the processing and storage of modality-specific item information. [less ▲]

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See detailBreakdown of within- and between-network resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity during propofol-induced loss of consciousness.
Boveroux, Pierre ULg; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg et al

in Anesthesiology (2010), 113(5), 1038-53

BACKGROUND: Mechanisms of anesthesia-induced loss of consciousness remain poorly understood. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging allows investigating whole-brain connectivity changes ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Mechanisms of anesthesia-induced loss of consciousness remain poorly understood. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging allows investigating whole-brain connectivity changes during pharmacological modulation of the level of consciousness. METHODS: Low-frequency spontaneous blood oxygen level-dependent fluctuations were measured in 19 healthy volunteers during wakefulness, mild sedation, deep sedation with clinical unconsciousness, and subsequent recovery of consciousness. RESULTS: Propofol-induced decrease in consciousness linearly correlates with decreased corticocortical and thalamocortical connectivity in frontoparietal networks (i.e., default- and executive-control networks). Furthermore, during propofol-induced unconsciousness, a negative correlation was identified between thalamic and cortical activity in these networks. Finally, negative correlations between default network and lateral frontoparietal cortices activity, present during wakefulness, decreased proportionally to propofol-induced loss of consciousness. In contrast, connectivity was globally preserved in low-level sensory cortices, (i.e., in auditory and visual networks across sedation stages). This was paired with preserved thalamocortical connectivity in these networks. Rather, waning of consciousness was associated with a loss of cross-modal interactions between visual and auditory networks. CONCLUSIONS: Our results shed light on the functional significance of spontaneous brain activity fluctuations observed in functional magnetic resonance imaging. They suggest that propofol-induced unconsciousness could be linked to a breakdown of cerebral temporal architecture that modifies both within- and between-network connectivity and thus prevents communication between low-level sensory and higher-order frontoparietal cortices, thought to be necessary for perception of external stimuli. They emphasize the importance of thalamocortical connectivity in higher-order cognitive brain networks in the genesis of conscious perception. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural basis of personal goal processing when envisioning future events
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Stawarczyk, David ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2010), 22

Abstract Episodic future thinking allows humans to mentally simulate virtually infinite future possibilities, yet this device is fundamentally goal-directed and should not be equated with fantasizing or ... [more ▼]

Abstract Episodic future thinking allows humans to mentally simulate virtually infinite future possibilities, yet this device is fundamentally goal-directed and should not be equated with fantasizing or wishful thinking. The purpose of this functional magnetic resonance imaging study was to investigate the neural basis of such goal-directed processing during future-event simulation. Participants were scanned while they imagined future events that were related to their personal goals (personal future events) and future events that were plausible but unrelated to their personal goals (nonpersonal future events). Results showed that imaging personal future events elicited stronger activation in ventral medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) compared to imaging nonpersonal future events. Moreover, these brain activations overlapped with activations elicited by a second task that assessed semantic self-knowledge (i.e., making judgments on one's own personality traits), suggesting that ventral MPFC and PCC mediate self-referential processing across different functional domains. It is suggested that these brain regions may support a collection of processes that evaluate, code, and contextualize the relevance of mental representations with regard to personal goals. The implications of these findings for the understanding of the function instantiated by the default network of the brain are also discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailSpectral quality of light modulates emotional brain responses in humans
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Schwartz, S.; Grandjean, D. et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2010), 107(45), 19549-54

Light therapy can be an effective treatment for mood disorders, suggesting that light is able to affect mood state in the long term. As a first step to understand this effect, we hypothesized that light ... [more ▼]

Light therapy can be an effective treatment for mood disorders, suggesting that light is able to affect mood state in the long term. As a first step to understand this effect, we hypothesized that light might also acutely influence emotion and tested whether short exposures to light modulate emotional brain responses. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, 17 healthy volunteers listened to emotional and neutral vocal stimuli while being exposed to alternating 40-s periods of blue or green ambient light. Blue (relative to green) light increased responses to emotional stimuli in the voice area of the temporal cortex and in the hippocampus. During emotional processing, the functional connectivity between the voice area, the amygdala, and the hypothalamus was selectively enhanced in the context of blue illumination, which shows that responses to emotional stimulation in the hypothalamus and amygdala are influenced by both the decoding of vocal information in the voice area and the spectral quality of ambient light. These results demonstrate the acute influence of light and its spectral quality on emotional brain processing and identify a unique network merging affective and ambient light information. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of spatio-temporal organization of slow waves during human NREM sleep
Schrouff, Jessica ULg; Leclercq, Yves ULg; Foret, Ariane et al

Poster (2009, December 14)

Sleep is a behavior commonly observed in a large number of animal species. However, neuroscientists still poorly understand the meaning of this loss of consciousness absolutely needed for life. In the ... [more ▼]

Sleep is a behavior commonly observed in a large number of animal species. However, neuroscientists still poorly understand the meaning of this loss of consciousness absolutely needed for life. In the present work, we established different methods to characterize the Slow Wave Sleep most recognizable patterns: the Slow Waves (SWs). Since the anatomical structure of white matter tracts that connect various brain regions is not random and thus must constraint the propagation of waves (Hagmann et al., 2008), our basic hypothesis was that large white matter bundles would bias the propagation of SW along specific patterns, which could be identified in homogeneous clusters of waves. To investigate our hypothesis, SWs were detected automatically on the three first periods of SWS using an algorithm based on Massimini et al., 2004. They were then clustered using a two steps procedure involving a hierarchical clustering based on delay maps and a k-means clustering based on the SWs potential in a given time interval around the maximum power of the SW negative peak. To compute the relevance of the final clusters, a mathematical criterion was implemented as well as a visual check. Results of the multisubjects study showed that only bad quality and small clusters could be obtained, suggesting that there is no particular organization of SWs across the night and inforcing the hypothesis that SWs are local phenomena, each one decreasing the homeostatic pressure in only one specific area. [less ▲]

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