References of "Maquet, Pierre"
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See detailDo evoked potentials contribute to the functional follow-up and clinical prognosis of multiple sclerosis?
GIFFROY, Xavier ULg; MAES, Nathalie ULg; Albert, Adelin ULg et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2017)

The clinical variability and complexity of multiple sclerosis (MS) challenges the individual clinical course prognostication. This study aimed to find out whether multimodal evoked potentials (EP ... [more ▼]

The clinical variability and complexity of multiple sclerosis (MS) challenges the individual clinical course prognostication. This study aimed to find out whether multimodal evoked potentials (EP) correlate with the motor components of multiple sclerosis functional composite (MSFCm) and predict clinically relevant motor functional deterioration. One hundred MS patients were assessed at baseline (T0) and about 7.5 years later (T1), with visual, somatosensory and motor EP and rated on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the MSFCm, including the 9 Hole Peg Test and the Timed 25 Foot Walk (T25FW). The Spearman correlation coefficient (rS) was used to evaluate the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationship between EP Z scores and clinical findings. The predictive value of baseline electrophysiological data for clinical worsening (EDSS, 9-HPT, T25FW, MSFCm) during follow-up was assessed by logistic regression analysis. Unlike longitudinal correlations, cross-sectional correlations between EP Z scores and clinical outcomes were all significant and ranged between 0.22 and 0.67 (p\0.05). The global EP Z score was systematically predictive of EDSS and MSFCm worsening over time (all p\0.05). EP latency was a better predictor than amplitude, although weaker than latency and amplitude aggregation in the global EP Z score. The study demonstrates that EP numerical scores can be used for motor function monitoring and outcome prediction in patients with MS. [less ▲]

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See detailCXCL12 mediates glioblastoma resistance to radiotherapy in the subventricular zone.
Goffart, Nicolas ULg; Lombard, Arnaud; Lallemand, François ULg et al

in Neuro-Oncology (2017), 19(1), 66-77

BACKGROUND: Patients with glioblastoma (GBM) have an overall median survival of 15 months despite multimodal therapy. These catastrophic survival rates are to be correlated to systematic relapses that ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Patients with glioblastoma (GBM) have an overall median survival of 15 months despite multimodal therapy. These catastrophic survival rates are to be correlated to systematic relapses that might arise from remaining glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) left behind after surgery. In this line, it has recently been demonstrated that GSCs are able to escape the tumor mass and preferentially colonize the adult subventricular zone (SVZ). At a distance from the initial tumor site, these GSCs might therefore represent a high-quality model of clinical resilience to therapy and cancer relapses as they specifically retain tumor-initiating abilities. METHOD: While relying on recent findings that have validated the existence of GSCs in the human SVZ, we questioned the role of the SVZ niche as a potential GSC reservoir involved in therapeutic failure. RESULTS: Our results demonstrate that (i) GSCs located in the SVZ are specifically resistant to radiation in vivo, (ii) these cells display enhanced mesenchymal roots that are known to be associated with cancer radioresistance, (iii) these mesenchymal traits are specifically upregulated by CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor-1) both in vitro and in the SVZ environment, (iv) the amount of SVZ-released CXCL12 mediates GBM resistance to radiation in vitro, and (v) interferes with the CXCL12/CXCR4 signalling system, allowing weakening of the tumor mesenchymal roots and radiosensitizing SVZ-nested GBM cells. CONCLUSION: Together, these data provide evidence on how the adult SVZ environment, through the release of CXCL12, supports GBM therapeutic failure and potential tumor relapse. [less ▲]

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See detailResting-state Network-specific Breakdown of Functional Connectivity during Ketamine Alteration of Consciousness in Volunteers
BONHOMME, Vincent ULg; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULg; Demertzi, Athina ULg et al

in Anesthesiology (2016), 125(5), 873-878

Background: Consciousness-altering anesthetic agents disturb connectivity between brain regions composing the resting-state consciousness networks (RSNs). The default mode network (DMn), executive control ... [more ▼]

Background: Consciousness-altering anesthetic agents disturb connectivity between brain regions composing the resting-state consciousness networks (RSNs). The default mode network (DMn), executive control network, salience network (SALn), auditory network, sensorimotor network (SMn), and visual network sustain mentation. Ketamine modifies consciousness differently from other agents, producing psychedelic dreaming and no apparent interaction with the environment. The authors used functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore ketamine-induced changes in RSNs connectivity. Methods: Fourteen healthy volunteers received stepwise intravenous infusions of ketamine up to loss of responsiveness. Because of agitation, data from six subjects were excluded from analysis. RSNs connectivity was compared between absence of ketamine (wake state [W1]), light ketamine sedation, and ketamine-induced unresponsiveness (deep sedation [S2]). Results: Increasing the depth of ketamine sedation from W1 to S2 altered DMn and SALn connectivity and suppressed the anticorrelated activity between DMn and other brain regions. During S2, DMn connectivity, particularly between the medial prefrontal cortex and the remaining network (effect size β [95% CI]: W1 = 0.20 [0.18 to 0.22]; S2 = 0.07 [0.04 to 0.09]), and DMn anticorrelated activity (e.g., right sensory cortex: W1 = −0.07 [−0.09 to −0.04]; S2 = 0.04 [0.01 to 0.06]) were broken down. SALn connectivity was nonuniformly suppressed (e.g., left parietal operculum: W1 = 0.08 [0.06 to 0.09]; S2 = 0.05 [0.02 to 0.07]). Executive control networks, auditory network, SMn, and visual network were minimally affected. Conclusions: Ketamine induces specific changes in connectivity within and between RSNs. Breakdown of frontoparietal DMn connectivity and DMn anticorrelation and sensory and SMn connectivity preservation are common to ketamine and propofol-induced alterations of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral Activity Associated with Transient Sleep-Facilitated Reduction in Motor Memory Vulnerability to Interference
Albouy, Geneviève; King, Bradley; Schmidt, Christina ULg et al

in Scientific Reports (2016), 6

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See detailLe syndrome de De Morsier : une cause congénitale méconnue d'hypopituitarisme
VALDES SOCIN, Hernan Gonzalo ULg; VERLOES, Alain ULg; Debray, François-Guillaume ULg et al

in Annales d'Endocrinologie : 33ème congrès de la Société Française d'Endocrinologie (2016, October)

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See detailAge-related differences in the dynamics of cortical excitability and cognitive inhibition during prolongedwakefulness
Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Chelllappa, S.; Ly, J. et al

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailCircadian dynamics in measures of cortical excitation and inhibition balance
Chellappa, Sarah; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; LY, Julien ULg et al

in Scientific Reports (2016), 6:33661

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See detailLocal modulation of human brain responses by circadian rhythmicity and sleep debt
Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle et al

in Science (2016), 351(6300),

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See detailSleep deprivation affects brain global cortical responsivenes
Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Chellappa, S; Ly, J et al

Conference (2016, June 15)

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See detailMultimodal evoked potentials for functional quantification and prognosis in multiple sclerosis
GIFFROY, Xavier ULg; MAES, Nathalie ULg; Albert, Adelin ULg et al

in BMC Neurology (2016)

Functional biomarkers able to identify multiple sclerosis (MS) patients at high risk of fast disability progression are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of multimodal (upper and ... [more ▼]

Functional biomarkers able to identify multiple sclerosis (MS) patients at high risk of fast disability progression are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of multimodal (upper and lower limbs motor, visual, lower limbs somatosensory) evoked potentials (EP) to monitor disease course and identify patients exposed to unfavourable evolution. One hundred MS patients were assessed with visual, somatosensory and motor EP and rated on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) at baseline (T0) and about 6 years later (T1). The Spearman correlation (rS) was used to evaluate the relationship between conventional EP scores and clinical findings. Multiple (logistic) regression analysis estimated the predictive value of baseline electrophysiological data for three clinical outcomes: EDSS, annual EDSS progression, and the risk of EDSS worsening. In contrast to longitudinal correlations, cross-sectional correlations between the different EP scores and EDSS were all significant (0.33 ≤ rS < 0.67, p < 0.001). Baseline global EP score and EDSS were highly significant predictors (p < 0.0001) of EDSS progression 6 years later. The aseline global EP score was found to be an independent predictor of the EDSS annual progression rate (p < 0.001), and of the risk of disability progression over time (p < 0.005). Based on a ROC curve determination, we defined a Global EP Score cut off point (17/30) to identify patients at high risk of disability progression illustrated by a positive predictive value of 70 %. This study provides a proof of the concept that electrophysiology could be added to MRI and used as another complementary prognostic tool in MS patients. [less ▲]

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See detailSeasonal variation in human COGNITIVE brain responses
Meyer, Christelle; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg et al

Poster (2016, June)

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See detailAtaxie optique: cas E.M.
DEMOULIN, Valentine ULg; Departz, Marie-Pierre; MAQUET, Pierre ULg

Poster (2016, May 28)

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See detailThe impact of dopaminergic genes on inhibitory processes and cognitive control.
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Meyer, Christelle et al

Poster (2016, March 18)

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See detailSeasonality in human cognitive brain responses
Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2016)

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See detailAutomatic artifacts and arousals detection in whole-night sleep EEG recordings
Coppieters't Wallant, Dorothe ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

in Journal of Neuroscience Methods (2016), 258

In sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) signals, artifacts and arousals marking are usually part of the processing. This visual inspection by a human expert has two main drawbacks: it is very time ... [more ▼]

In sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) signals, artifacts and arousals marking are usually part of the processing. This visual inspection by a human expert has two main drawbacks: it is very time consuming and subjective. To detect artifacts and arousals in a reliable, systematic and reproducible automatic way, we developed an automatic detection based on time and frequency analysis with adapted thresholds derived from data themselves. The automatic detection performance is assessed using 5 statistic parameters, on 60 whole night sleep recordings coming from 35 healthy volunteers (male and female) aged between 19 and 26. The proposed approach proves its robustness against inter- and intra-, subjects and raters’ scorings, variability. The agreement with human raters is rated overall from substantial to excellent and provides a significantly more reliable method than between human raters. Existing methods detect only specific artifacts or only arousals, and/or these methods are validated on short episodes of sleep recordings, making it difficult to compare with our whole night results. The method works on a whole night recording and is fully automatic, reproducible, and reliable. Furthermore the implementation of the method will be made available online as open source code. [less ▲]

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See detailDopaminergic neurons differentiating from LRRK2 G2019S induced pluripotent stem cells show early neuritic branching defects.
Borgs, Laurence; Peyre, Elise ULg; Alix, Philippe et al

in Scientific Reports (2016), 6

Some mutations of the LRRK2 gene underlie autosomal dominant form of Parkinson's disease (PD). The G2019S is a common mutation that accounts for about 2% of PD cases. To understand the pathophysiology of ... [more ▼]

Some mutations of the LRRK2 gene underlie autosomal dominant form of Parkinson's disease (PD). The G2019S is a common mutation that accounts for about 2% of PD cases. To understand the pathophysiology of this mutation and its possible developmental implications, we developed an in vitro assay to model PD with human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) reprogrammed from skin fibroblasts of PD patients suffering from the LRKK2 G2019S mutation. We differentiated the hiPSCs into neural stem cells (NSCs) and further into dopaminergic neurons. Here we show that NSCs bearing the mutation tend to differentiate less efficiently into dopaminergic neurons and that the latter exhibit significant branching defects as compared to their controls. [less ▲]

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See detailCircadian and homeostatic sleep pressure modulate fMRI correlates of vigilant attention
Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, C et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2016), 25(s1),

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See detailCircadian regulation of human cortical excitability
LY, Julien ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Chellappa, Sarah et al

in Nature Communications (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (4 ULg)