References of "Malgrange, Brigitte"
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See detailCycling or not cycling: cell cycle regulatory molecules and adult neurogenesis.
Beukelaers, Pierre ULg; Vandenbosch, Renaud ULg; Caron, Nicolas ULg et al

in Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS (2012), 69(9), 1493-1503

The adult brain most probably reaches its highest degree of plasticity with the lifelong generation and integration of new neurons in the hippocampus and olfactory system. Neural precursor cells (NPCs ... [more ▼]

The adult brain most probably reaches its highest degree of plasticity with the lifelong generation and integration of new neurons in the hippocampus and olfactory system. Neural precursor cells (NPCs) residing both in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles continuously generate neurons that populate the dentate gyrus and the olfactory bulb, respectively. The regulation of NPC proliferation in the adult brain has been widely investigated in the past few years. Yet, the intrinsic cell cycle machinery underlying NPC proliferation remains largely unexplored. In this review, we discuss the cell cycle components that are involved in the regulation of NPC proliferation in both neurogenic areas of the adult brain. [less ▲]

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See detailMicroRNAs tune cerebral cortical neurogenesis.
Volvert, M.-L.; Rogister, F.; Moonen, Gustave ULg et al

in Cell Death & Differentiation (2012), 19(10), 1573-81

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that promote post-transcriptional silencing of genes involved in a wide range of developmental and pathological processes. It is estimated that most protein-coding ... [more ▼]

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that promote post-transcriptional silencing of genes involved in a wide range of developmental and pathological processes. It is estimated that most protein-coding genes harbor miRNA recognition sequences in their 3' untranslated region and are thus putative targets. While functions of miRNAs have been extensively characterized in various tissues, their multiple contributions to cerebral cortical development are just beginning to be unveiled. This review aims to outline the evidence collected to date demonstrating a role for miRNAs in cerebral corticogenesis with a particular emphasis on pathways that control the birth and maturation of functional excitatory projection neurons. [less ▲]

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See detailp27(Kip1) Is a Microtubule-Associated Protein that Promotes Microtubule Polymerization during Neuron Migration.
Godin, Juliette ULg; Thomas, Noemie; Laguesse, Sophie ULg et al

in Developmental Cell (2012), 23(4), 729-44

The migration of cortical interneurons is characterized by extensive morphological changes that result from successive cycles of nucleokinesis and neurite branching. Their molecular bases remain elusive ... [more ▼]

The migration of cortical interneurons is characterized by extensive morphological changes that result from successive cycles of nucleokinesis and neurite branching. Their molecular bases remain elusive, and the present work describes how p27(Kip1) controls cell-cycle-unrelated signaling pathways to regulate these morphological remodelings. Live imaging reveals that interneurons lacking p27(Kip1) show delayed tangential migration resulting from defects in both nucleokinesis and dynamic branching of the leading process. At the molecular level, p27(Kip1) is a microtubule-associated protein that promotes polymerization of microtubules in extending neurites, thereby contributing to tangential migration. Furthermore, we show that p27(Kip1) controls actomyosin contractions that drive both forward translocation of the nucleus and growth cone splitting. Thus, p27(Kip1) cell-autonomously controls nucleokinesis and neurite branching by regulating both actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. [less ▲]

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See detailp27(Kip1) as a master regulator of cortical neuron migration
Godin, Juliette ULg; Thomas, Noémie; Laguesse, Sophie ULg et al

Scientific conference (2011, June)

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See detailComparaison des outils bibliographiques et bibliométriques Web of Science et Scopus : rapport du groupe de réflexion mis en place par la Bibliothèque Interuniversitaire de la Communauté française de Belgique (BICfB)
Lerinckx, Dominique; Baguet, Muriel; Renaville, François ULg et al

Report (2011)

Depuis 2002, l'ensemble des membres de la BICfB souscrivent au Web of Science (WoS) de Thomson Reuters, plus précisément aux sous-bases Science Citation Index (SCI), Social Sciences Citation Index (SCCI ... [more ▼]

Depuis 2002, l'ensemble des membres de la BICfB souscrivent au Web of Science (WoS) de Thomson Reuters, plus précisément aux sous-bases Science Citation Index (SCI), Social Sciences Citation Index (SCCI) et Arts and Humanities Citation Index (A&HCI). Web of Science, partie du Web of Knowledge (WoK), est une base de données bibliographiques et d'analyse de citations renommée, au départ unique en son genre. Avec le Journal Citation Reports (JCR), elle est également beaucoup utilisée comme base de référence dans l'évaluation des chercheurs et de la recherche. En 2004, deux ressources concurrentes ont vu le jour. Il s'agit de Google Scholar (gratuit mais n'offrant pas autant de fonctionnalités) et de Scopus, un produit Elsevier. Aussi, lors de l'Assemblée générale de la BICfB du 4 mai 2010, les institutions ont décidé de constituer un groupe de réflexion interuniversitaire composé de membres issus des conseils ou administrations de la recherche, de bibliothèques et de représentants du F.R.S.-FNRS afin de comparer en profondeur ces outils. Ce rapport, présenté lors de l'AG du 7 juin 2011 de la BICfB, est le fruit du travail du groupe de réflexion. [less ▲]

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See detailSpatio-temporal localization of the cytoskeleton during auditory organ development in mammalia
Johnen, Nicolas ULg; Thelen, Nicolas ULg; Cloes, Marie ULg et al

Poster (2011, March 31)

The auditory organ, the organ of Corti (OC), is a highly specialized structure composed by specific cellular types. The sensory cells (HC) are characterized by stereocilia at their apex and are necessary ... [more ▼]

The auditory organ, the organ of Corti (OC), is a highly specialized structure composed by specific cellular types. The sensory cells (HC) are characterized by stereocilia at their apex and are necessary for the sound perception. Theses cells are supported by supporting cells. Based on their morphology and physiology, at least four types of supporting cells (SC) can be identified in the OC: inner and outer pillar cells (PC), phalangeal cell and Deiter’s cells. Sensory and supporting cells possess characteristic cytoskeleton proteins in direct relation with their morphological features and their development. Indeed, this organ had morphological changes such as the setting up of the sensory epithelium after the birth or the openings of the Corti’s tunnel at P8 and of the Nuel’s spaces at P10. In the present study, by using confocal microscopy, we investigated the spatio-temporal localization of the three cellular cytoskeletal filaments : microtubules (β-1, 2, 3, 4-tubulin), microfilaments (cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin) and intermediate filaments (CK4, 5, 7, 8, CKpan and vimentin) during the development of the OC in rat from the embryonic day 18 (E18) to the post-natal day 25 (P25). The immunolabellings indicated clearly that β-1, 2, 3-tubulins were only present the SC and nervous fibers during development whereas β-4-tubulin was found firstly in the HC and then in the SC. The two actin-isotypes were detected in the HC apex but were also seen in the PC from P8 to P25 for β-actin isoform and in the basal membrane from E18 to P8 for the γ-actin isoform. All intermediate filament proteins were only found in the SC, especially between P8 and P12. Our results show that the localization of the cytoskeleton proteins during the auditory organ development depends on the cellular type and the developmental stage. A profound modification of cytoskeleton occurs between P8 and P12. [less ▲]

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See detailDistribution of glycogen during the development of the organ of Corti
Thelen, Nicolas ULg; Cloes, Marie ULg; Johnen, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2011, January 31)

Although the structure of the auditory organ in mature mammals, the organ of Corti, is clearly established, its development is far from being elucidated. Using cytochemical methods at the light and ... [more ▼]

Although the structure of the auditory organ in mature mammals, the organ of Corti, is clearly established, its development is far from being elucidated. Using cytochemical methods at the light and electron microscope levels, we examined the spatiotemporal distribution of polysaccharides during the development of the organ of Corti in rats from embryonic day 16 (E16) to postnatal day 15 (P15). At E16, small polysaccharide inclusions were detected in the cytoplasm of the future inner pillar cells by electron microscope only. These inclusions became obvious at the light microscope level at E17. At E19, the polysaccharide deposits were important within the inner pillar cells and they arose in the Hensen cells cytoplasm. Polysaccharide accumulations also appeared in the outer pillar cells and the Deiters cells from P3-P4. As the organ of Corti developed, the amount of polysaccharide inclusions within the inner and outer pillar cells decreased. At P15, large amount of polysaccharide deposits were visible in the Deiters cells whereas they had almost disappeared from the inner and outer pillar cells. Finally, we showed that the polysaccharide deposits present in the developing organ of Corti are PAS-positive and can be digested with a salivary amylase, suggesting that they are essentially constituted of glycogen. [less ▲]

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See detailCdk6-dependent regulation of g(1) length controls adult neurogenesis.
Beukelaers, Pierre; Vandenbosch, Renaud ULg; Caron, Nicolas ULg et al

in Stem Cells (2011), 29(4), 713-24

The presence of neurogenic precursors in the adult mammalian brain is now widely accepted, but the mechanisms coupling their proliferation with the onset of neuronal differentiation remain unknown. Here ... [more ▼]

The presence of neurogenic precursors in the adult mammalian brain is now widely accepted, but the mechanisms coupling their proliferation with the onset of neuronal differentiation remain unknown. Here, we unravel the major contribution of the G(1) regulator cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (Cdk6) to adult neurogenesis. We found that Cdk6 was essential for cell proliferation within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. Specifically, Cdk6 deficiency prevents the expansion of neuronally committed precursors by lengthening G(1) phase duration, reducing concomitantly the production of newborn neurons. Altogether, our data support G(1) length as an essential regulator of the switch between proliferation and neuronal differentiation in the adult brain and Cdk6 as one intrinsic key molecular regulator of this process. STEM Cells 2011;29:713-724. [less ▲]

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See detailCdk2 loss accelerates precursor differentiation and remyelination in the adult central nervous system.
Caillava, Céline; Vandenbosch, Renaud ULg; Jablonska, Beata et al

in Journal of Cell Biology (2011), 193(2), 397-407

The specific functions of intrinsic regulators of oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) division are poorly understood. Type 2 cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk2) controls cell cycle progression of OPCs, but ... [more ▼]

The specific functions of intrinsic regulators of oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) division are poorly understood. Type 2 cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk2) controls cell cycle progression of OPCs, but whether it acts during myelination and repair of demyelinating lesions remains unexplored. Here, we took advantage of a viable Cdk2(-/-) mutant mouse to investigate the function of this cell cycle regulator in OPC proliferation and differentiation in normal and pathological conditions. During central nervous system (CNS) development, Cdk2 loss does not affect OPC cell cycle, oligodendrocyte cell numbers, or myelination. However, in response to CNS demyelination, it clearly alters adult OPC renewal, cell cycle exit, and differentiation. Importantly, Cdk2 loss accelerates CNS remyelination of demyelinated axons. Thus, Cdk2 is dispensable for myelination but is important for adult OPC renewal, and could be one of the underlying mechanisms that drive adult progenitors to differentiate and thus regenerate myelin. [less ▲]

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See detailUsing human pluripotent stem cells to untangle neurodegenerative disease mechanisms
Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Borgs, Laurence ULg; Grobarczyk, Benjamin ULg et al

in Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS (2011), 68(4), 635-49

Human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic (hES) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS), retain the ability to self-renew indefinitely, while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into all ... [more ▼]

Human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic (hES) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS), retain the ability to self-renew indefinitely, while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into all cell types of the nervous system. While human pluripotent cell-based therapies are unlikely to arise soon, these cells can currently be used as an inexhaustible source of committed neurons to perform high-throughput screening and safety testing of new candidate drugs. Here, we describe critically the available methods and molecular factors that are used to direct the differentiation of hES or hiPS into specific neurons. In addition, we discuss how the availability of patient-specific hiPS offers a unique opportunity to model inheritable neurodegenerative diseases and untangle their pathological mechanisms, or to validate drugs that would prevent the onset or the progression of these neurological disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailStructure and development of cochlear afferent innervation in mammals.
Defourny, Jean ULg; Lallemend, Francois; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg

in American Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology (2011), 301(4), 750-61

In mammals, sensorineural deafness results from damage to the auditory receptors of the inner ear, the nerve pathways to the brain or the cortical area that receives sound information. In this review, we ... [more ▼]

In mammals, sensorineural deafness results from damage to the auditory receptors of the inner ear, the nerve pathways to the brain or the cortical area that receives sound information. In this review, we first focused on the cellular and molecular events taking part to spiral ganglion axon growth, extension to the organ of Corti, and refinement. In the second half, we considered the functional maturation of synaptic contacts between sensory hair cells and their afferent projections. A better understanding of all these processes could open insights into novel therapeutic strategies aimed to re-establish primary connections from sound transducers to the ascending auditory nerve pathways. [less ▲]

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See detailOtotoxic drugs: difference in sensitivity between mice and guinea pigs.
Poirrier, Anne-Lise ULg; Van den Ackerveken, P.; Kim, T. S. et al

in Toxicology Letters (2010), 193(1), 41-9

The development of experimental animal models has played an invaluable role in understanding the mechanisms of neurosensory deafness and in devising effective treatments. The purpose of this study was to ... [more ▼]

The development of experimental animal models has played an invaluable role in understanding the mechanisms of neurosensory deafness and in devising effective treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop an adult mouse model of ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss and to compare the ototoxicity in the adult mouse to that in the well-described guinea pig model. Mice are a powerful model organism, especially due to the large availability of antibodies, probes and genetic mutants. In this study, mice (n=114) and guinea pigs (n=35) underwent systemic treatment with either kanamycin or cisplatin. Auditory brainstem responses showed a significant threshold shift in guinea pigs 2 weeks after the beginning of the ototoxic treatment, while there was no significant hearing impairment recorded in mice. Hair cells and neuronal loss were correlated with hearing function in both guinea pigs and mice. These results indicate that the mouse is not a good model for ototoxicity, which should be taken into consideration in all further investigations concerning ototoxicity-induced hearing loss. [less ▲]

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See detailOxidative Stress in the Cochlea: An Update.
Poirrier, Anne-Lise ULg; Pincemail, Joël ULg; Van Den Ackerveken, P. et al

in Current Medicinal Chemistry (2010)

This paper will focus on understanding the role and action of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in the molecular and biochemical pathways responsible for the regulation of ... [more ▼]

This paper will focus on understanding the role and action of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in the molecular and biochemical pathways responsible for the regulation of the survival of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons in the auditory portion of the inner ear. The pivotal role of ROS/RNS in ototoxicity makes them potentially valuable candidates for effective otoprotective strategies. In this review, we describe the major characteristics of ROS/RNS and the different oxidative processes observed during ototoxic cascades. At each step, we discuss their potential as therapeutic targets because an increasing number of compounds that modulate ROS/RNS processing or targets are being identified. [less ▲]

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See detailHearing Preservation in Cochlear Implantation and Drug Treatment.
Barriat, Sébastien ULg; Poirrier, Anne-Lise ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg et al

in Advances in Oto-Rhino-Laryngology (2010), 67

Insertion of an electrode array into the cochlea produces immediate damage to the inner ear, which is responsible for a hearing loss. In addition, a delayed hearing loss can be observed. In order to ... [more ▼]

Insertion of an electrode array into the cochlea produces immediate damage to the inner ear, which is responsible for a hearing loss. In addition, a delayed hearing loss can be observed. In order to maximize hearing preservation after insertion of an electrode and to enhance the performance of the cochlear implant, it has been proposed to deliver pharmacological agents to the inner ear. Molecules can be administered locally to the inner ear through a direct perilymphatic perfusion or through the round window membrane. These modalities of treatment have already been successfully applied to some patients with inner ear diseases. In this paper, we will review some basic aspects of drug delivery to the inner ear to prevent the degeneration of the neurosensory hair cells and auditory neurons, and the actual applicability to humans in order to maintain hearing function after the insertion of electrodes of a cochlear implant. [less ▲]

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See detailGlial but not neuronal development in the cochleo-vestibular ganglion requires Sox10.
Breuskin, Ingrid ULg; Bodson, Morgan ULg; Thelen, Nicolas ULg et al

in Journal of Neurochemistry (2010), 114(6), 1827-39

The cochleo-vestibular ganglion contains neural crest-derived glial cells and sensory neurons that are derived from the neurogenic otic placode. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that ... [more ▼]

The cochleo-vestibular ganglion contains neural crest-derived glial cells and sensory neurons that are derived from the neurogenic otic placode. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate the tightly orchestrated development of this structure. Here, we report that Sox10, a high-mobility group DNA-binding domain transcription factor that is required for the proper development of neural crest cell derivatives, is specifically expressed in post-migratory neural crest cells in the cochleo-vestibular ganglion. Using Sox10-deficient mice, we demonstrate that this transcription factor is essential for the survival, but not the generation, of the post-migratory neural crest cells within the inner ear. In the absence of these neural crest-derived cells, we have investigated the survival of the otocyst-derived auditory neurons. Surprisingly, auditory neuron differentiation, sensory target innervation and survival are conserved despite the absence of glial cells. Moreover, brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression is increased in the hair cells of Sox10-deficient mice, a compensatory mechanism that may prevent spiral ganglion neuronal cell death. Taken together, these data suggest that in the absence of neural crest-derived glial cells, an increase trophic support from hair cells promotes the survival of spiral ganglion neurons in Sox10 mutant mice. [less ▲]

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See detailSPATIO-TEMPORAL LOCALIZATION OF INTERMEDIATE FILAMENTS IN THE ORGAN OF CORTI BETWEEN THE EMBRYONIC DAY 18 (E18) AND THE POST-NATAL DAY 15 (P15) IN RAT
Johnen, Nicolas ULg; Thelen, Nicolas ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg et al

Poster (2009, October 17)

The mammalian auditory organ, the organ of Corti (OC), is composed of mechanosensory hair cells and nonsensory supporting cell types. Based on their morphology and physiology, a least four types of ... [more ▼]

The mammalian auditory organ, the organ of Corti (OC), is composed of mechanosensory hair cells and nonsensory supporting cell types. Based on their morphology and physiology, a least four types of supporting cells can be identified in the OC: inner pillar cell, outer pillar cell, phalangeal cell and Deiter’s cells. The structure of this organ is well reported in adult but its development is still little known. Using antibodies directed against different proteins of intermediate filaments cytoskeleton, we studied the spatial-temporal localization of cytokeratins (typical of epithelial cells) and vimentin (typical of mesenchymal cells) during the differentiation of the OC in rat from the embryonic day 18 (E18) to the postnatal day (P15). Whatever the antibody used, we observed an obvious labelling over the supporting cells after the birth. In particular, an intense labelling is observed in the pillar cells and in the Deiters’ cells at P8 and at P10. These results suggest that the epithelial-mesenchymal transition might be implicated in the opening of Corti’s tunnel between the pillar cells and the formation of the Nuel’s spaces between the Deiters’ cell and their outer hair cells, at P8 and at P10 respectively. [less ▲]

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See detailHair cell progenitors: identification and regulatory genes
Bodson, Morgan ULg; Breuskin, Ingrid ULg; Lefèbvre, Philippe ULg et al

in Acta Oto-Laryngologica (2009), 10

Hair cell loss in higher vertebrates appears to be permanent. Progenitors that are quiescent in the organ of Corti are the best candidates for the restoration of the different cell types in the organ of ... [more ▼]

Hair cell loss in higher vertebrates appears to be permanent. Progenitors that are quiescent in the organ of Corti are the best candidates for the restoration of the different cell types in the organ of Corti. However, little is known about the presence of these progenitors and their capacity to differentiate into hair cells. This review will first highlight recent findings concerning the identification of progenitor cells that are able to proliferate and to differentiate into hair cells. Principal factors impinging on this process are then reviewed. Auditory hair cell progenitors have been identified and, under appropriate conditions, are capable of proliferating and differentiating into hair cells. Characterization of signals that maintain, expand and regulate these progenitors will be essential for the biomedical application of stem cell populations to restore hearing. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression patterns of miR-96, miR-182 and miR-183 in the development inner ear
Sacheli, Rosalie ULg; Nguyen, Laurent ULg; Borgs, Laurence ULg et al

in Gene Expression Patterns (2009)

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a class of small non-coding endogenous RNAs that downregulate gene expression by binding to 3' untranslated region (UTR) of target messenger RNAs. Although they have been ... [more ▼]

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a class of small non-coding endogenous RNAs that downregulate gene expression by binding to 3' untranslated region (UTR) of target messenger RNAs. Although they have been found to regulate developmental and physiological processes in several organs and tissues, their role in the regulation of the inner ear transcriptome remains unknown. In this report, we have performed systematic in situ hybridization to analyze the temporal and spatial distribution of three miRNAs (miR-96, mR-182, and mR-183) that are likely to arise from a single precursor RNA during the development and the maturation of the cochlea. Strikingly we found that the expression of mR-96, mR-182 and mR-183 was highly dynamic during the development of the cochlea, from the patterning to the differentiation of the main cochlear structures. [less ▲]

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See detailSupporting cell cytoskeleton during development of the organ of Corti in rat
Johnen, Nicolas ULg; Thelen, Nicolas ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg et al

Poster (2009, May 11)

The mammalian auditory organ, the organ of Corti (OC), is composed of mechanosensory hair cells and nonsensory supporting cell types. Based on their morphology and physiology, a least four types of ... [more ▼]

The mammalian auditory organ, the organ of Corti (OC), is composed of mechanosensory hair cells and nonsensory supporting cell types. Based on their morphology and physiology, a least four types of supporting cells can be identified in the OC: inner pillar cell, outer pillar cell, phalangeal cell and Deiter’s cells. All supporting cells are highly specialized cells that are characterized by the presence of bundled microtubules with 15 protofilaments instead of 13. Using antibobies against different proteins of cytoskeleton (tubulin, cutokeratin and vimentin), we investigated by confocal microscopy the setting up of supporting cells' cytoskeleton during the differentiation of the OC in art from the embryonic day 18 (E18) to the postnatal 15 (P15). We showed that the inner pillar cells are labelled with an anti-beta IV tubulin from P0. Using an antibody to cytokeratin, a labelling appeared in Deiters' cells from E22. We also revealed that during the development of the OC, supporting cells were labelled with an anti-vimentin antibody from P0. [less ▲]

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See detailElongator controls the migration and differentiation of cortical neurons through acetylation of a tubulin
Creppe, Catherine ULg; Malinouskaya, Lina ULg; Volvert, Marie-Laure ULg et al

in Cell (2009), 136

The generation of cortical projection neurons relies on the coordination of radial migration with branching. Here we report that the multi-subunit histone acetyltransferase Elongator complex, which ... [more ▼]

The generation of cortical projection neurons relies on the coordination of radial migration with branching. Here we report that the multi-subunit histone acetyltransferase Elongator complex, which contributes to transcript elongation, also regulates the maturation of projection neurons. Indeed, silencing of its scaffold (Elp1) or catalytic subunit (Elp3) cell-autonomously delays the migration and impairs the branching of projection neurons. Strikingly, neurons defective in Elongator show reduced levels of acetylated alpha tubulin. A direct reduction of alpha tubulin acetylation leads to comparable defects in cortical neurons and suggests that alpha tubulin is a target of Elp3. This is further supported by the demonstration that Elp3 promotes acetylation and counteracts HDAC6-mediated deacetylation of this substrate in vitro. Our results uncover alpha tubulin as a target of the Elongator complex and suggest that a tight regulation of its acetylation underlies the maturation of cortical projection neurons. [less ▲]

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